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cjweaver13

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  1. > @MonteScheinblum said: > 1. You’re not supposed to bow through impact. > 2. That’s way too late even if you were supposed to do that. > > The bow has to be in transition. So then does closing/squaring up the face come from the rotary motion of the arms in the radius area and also the body rotation through hips and shoulders?
  2. Thanks all for the help. I have a lot to try next I go play. Even sitting at my desk manipulating my wrist and arms a little I can see how these differences will affect angle of attack and club face
  3. > @BrianMcG said: > Wrong thread. What is correct thread then. Please give further advice so I can avoid these mistakes rather than just say "wrong thread"
  4. > @chigolfer1 said: > > @cjweaver13 said: > > Like many, I am a slicer or fader on a good day. With my irons I can sometimes get a draw shot. After using toptracer at my local range, I found out I can get an in out to out swing path fairly consistently, but have a hard time closing the club face. I have trained myself to use an incredibly strong grip and really using fingers making sure not to palm it. Focusing on keeping the lead wrist bowed a little and logo closed to target helps some. Recently I watched a Clay Ballard video on increasing power by lifting front heel and sla
  5. Like many, I am a slicer or fader on a good day. With my irons I can sometimes get a draw shot. After using toptracer at my local range, I found out I can get an in out to out swing path fairly consistently, but have a hard time closing the club face. I have trained myself to use an incredibly strong grip and really using fingers making sure not to palm it. Focusing on keeping the lead wrist bowed a little and logo closed to target helps some. Recently I watched a Clay Ballard video on increasing power by lifting front heel and slamming down before downswing which helps, because it closes my h
  6. When I watch most higher level players, they all address the ball what looks like "one ball too far away" then move the club head and arms back behind the ball if that makes sense. Is this to get a weight centered stance, more toe biased club head path or what? I feel like I address the ball with the club face right behind the ball, then move my body around that...then again I also have a tendancy to hit heel side with a fairly neutral path. Just wondering overall what the methodology is, and to see if I should adopt this method of addressing the ball once I understand the "why" behind it.
  7. I know I've seen videos talking about how cleaner clubs can help spin, but it'd be an interesting experiment to see if rust or other small debris on the club can have an effect on dispersion? (think like a very tiny hosel strike)
  8. > @Stuart_G said: > The grooves don't generally play nearly as much a part in the spin DRY conditions as most people think. Much like the treads of your car tires - they are designed to improve friction for wet conditions. > > When wedges do wear to the point of loosing spin, it's really caused by wear on the flat part of the face, not the grooves. The best treatment for that is to search around and find someone that can do a quick sand-blasting job on the face. Groove sharpeners, if not used properly (which is common) can actually raise a burr on the edge of the g
  9. First off, new member so welcome! I am a 20ish handicap and have recently started playing a little more seriously. My metals are Cleveland TA7 Tour irons (3-PW) Callaway Mack Daddy PM 56° with 13° bounce, and Cleveland 588 DSG 60°. The Cleveland wedge I just picked up for $20 to replace an old Adams that I could not hit due to the bounce. Because the Cleveland is normal carbon steel and is used, some of the grooves are a little chewed up and dull. Would the groove sharpener with the start shaped teeth on amazon (I can't post links yet) help with this and gain some spin back, or is it not nec
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