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HappyGilmoresBoots

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  1. 54 on the indoor golf simulator, playing the front 9 at Augusta. Short shots (inside 100 or so) are hard, and it was limited by the fact that the simulator technology had everyone shooting about 10% shorter than we'd expected.
  2. The putt, for sure. You absolutely plan to use a putter on each hole...the same can't be said for any other club in the bag. I take a little issue with the presumption that irons aren't important. Sure, if you're distilling golf to just 3 shots, it would be drive, wedge, and putt...but, your irons are the meat of the sandwich. Irons make up for a bad drive. Irons comprise the absolute bulk of the shots you'll take each round. I'd go so far as to say that irons are more important than wedges.
  3. 10 dozen or more? Holy smokes! I settled into the KSigs late in the season for me - they sorta kinda became my go-to ball, and as such, have been cemented in my brain as my "stock" yardages. They're a little shorter than a ProV1 or other balls.
  4. Unless you're a tour player being paid to do so, having all your clubs and accessories from one brand isn't a whole lot different than box sets from Academy Sports and similar stores.
  5. I'm thinking of focusing on a specific mission this winter: Find a set of mid-90's Big Berthas. Are those generally as popular as Ping Eyes and/or Zings, or will they be more difficult to find?
  6. And, I was trying to avoid that digression in this thread, but since we're here: Adam made some great points, but did so with bad-faith arguments. I felt like he was coming from the perspective of a good ol' debate, whereas the guest was just there for a discussion or something.
  7. The whole premise was that free fittings were the loss leader - get 'em into your shop with a free fitting, and you've planted that seed into the customer's mind. They'll remember your great service and return in the future. Even day-of, they're more likely (per the podcast) to buy miscellaneous stuff on their way out the door...tees, a towel, whatever. The money is made later on, when the customer buys a set of clubs, then tells all of their friends about it. The half hour of time for the rudimentary fitting is an investment later on down the line. Or, to use your example of Taylor Made clubs - they give you a free set of clubs, say as a junior or new golfer. That's an investment in loyalty...later on, as an adult, you're going to think of Taylor Made first. You're not going to think of Ping or Mizuno or Sub70.
  8. Hey, I live there - Diamond Springs (seen in the NLU video) is listed as my home course on TheGrint. A couple other gems in the area include Macatawa Golf Club in Holland (though I've heard pretty solid rumors that they're going 100% private again next season), I personally enjoy Wallinwood Springs in Jenison (some in this thread have poo-pooed the course, but it's still got good bones), and Winding Creek (also in Holland) has a very similar vibe to Wallinwood.
  9. That was a bit of a shocker to me - he had an incredibly poor attitude.
  10. This was brought up on a recent No Putts Given podcast, and was presented in a pretty solid debate-style format: On the one hand, free club fittings would get more people in the door (of a given golf shop), and has been noticed to increase repeat customers - by offering a free fitting, loft/lie adjustments, and other low-grade measurements, you're creating a personal relationship with that customer. That customer will probably buy accessories - sleeve of balls, pack of tees, etc. and will likely come back next time they buy clubs because they know the service is impeccable. And, the cohost argued, that end-level satisfaction will be higher because even a 30-handicapper will now have a proper set of tools to begin crafting their swing around. On the other hand, time is money, and there are many more beneficial areas for any double-digit handicap golfer to spend money other than fittings...and that's saying nothing about the time and effort expended by the shop (there are a finite number of fittings that can be done per day, and each one of these fittings takes a fitting technician off of the sales floor). The guest argued about the cost of fitting rigs (up to and including Trackman or other launch monitors), the labor involved, and the space required for all of this. Did anyone else catch this episode? What were your reactions?
  11. I'm looking for some scans of issues of Golf Digest and any other magazines from the 1990s for a bit of a winter research project. I know Issuu.com used to have a bunch posted, but they've shifted more towards current issues (and their UI/UX is terrible nowadays for some reason).
  12. 69 and 61 in my first "competition." I won Highest Score award and the Biggest Differential Between Front 9 and Back 9. It was then that I began contemplating lessons.
  13. Somewhere around '94 or '95, my dad cut down an old pitching wedge and gave it to me. A few years later, I was enrolled in a youth league at the local pitching range, just learning the basics. I fumbled around summer leagues through school, stopped playing golf, then got back into golf around 2018 or so. I'd never had any sort of professional training apart from the super basics in the mid 90s (ball lined up with your belt buckle, pivot off of your front foot, keep your head down, etc.). Through the years, I'd picked up tips from magazines and videotapes, random old farts at the driving range, and later, Youtube and forums. This year, I've posted about my struggles - I was playing once a week, in an effort to just get out and get some swings in...yet, each time I played, my scores got worse and worse. I took one lesson...one half-hour session with a PGA pro...and the freefall stopped. He gave me pointers; some things to focus on while I'm setting up for my swing, and some warmup drills before I start. This $50 investment has made a much bigger impact on my score and HCP thus far than any gear I've ever purchased. I'm firmly in the "buy lessons!" camp now.
  14. Lotta bogeys, coming in at a 46 today on a par-35 front nine. I beat my dad though! Both of us struggled quite a bit in the stiff wind.
  15. I feel ya there. I've struggled with performance because I haven't been able to play at *my* pace. I love walking 9, because that gives me a chance to casually walk up to each ball and take in the scenery in order to plan my next shot. This summer, every round I've played has been carts only, and I've either been incredibly rushed by groups pushing up my rear end, or waiting 5 minutes before each shot because of a group in front of me (usually held up by 2 or 3 groups in front of them).
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