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Roody

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    Rochester, NY

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  1. Mostly Rick Shiels, No Laying Up, and Peter Finch. Manolo Teaches Golf on Instagram is a fun watch. DASSSSSIT!
  2. 115 rounds in 2020, 97 this past season. It was less in 2021 because I hurt my back pretty bad in mid-September and was forced to take a break for a few weeks. If not for that, I am not sure the words "I've had enough" are even in my vocabulary.
  3. Alright then, I shall mention a few stories of my experiences in the "A" flight of club championships over the years. The one I mentioned earlier, winning in 2017 was a bit of a surprise. The first round I didn't play awful, but I didn't play great either. I think I was middle of the pack somewhere. I played pretty good in day two. I thought it was good enough to move me up the leaderboard, but I didn't think I'd win it outright. When I got done with my round, I went in for a beer and lunch. About a half hour later, the pro came in and told me I won. I said "you're messing with me, right?", Apparently everyone else had a bad round. One of my favorite club championships was from 2012. I was tied for first place after day 1, which got me into the final group for day 2. Right there, that was pretty cool. The guy I was playing against was steady Eddie all day long. Not a big hitter, but I don't think he missed a fairway. He got up on me by a couple strokes early on, but I clawed back to even with him through hole 16. It was so much fun, felt like a heavyweight battle to me. Anyways, on hole 16 I piped a gorgeous drive down the fairway and left myself only 85 yards out on a par 4. He hit his 5-wood, also in the fairway, but much shorter than I. Like most of the day, he hit his second shot and was on the green. I get to my shot, and 85 yards would be a hard LW for me, or a 3/4 SW. I decided to try the 3/4 SW. I chunked it. Then I chunked the next shot. I tripled the hole, and it was over. What I am proud of from that day was making it into the final group, and maintaining my composure for as long as I did. I hit some great shots that day, under pressure. What I also learned in that moment is if I am faced with a full shot versus a 3/4 shot, I think hitting the full shot is the smarter choice when you're nervous.
  4. Having done a few of these over the past 20 or so years, my general comments are mostly warnings around the casual guys: - Bandon might be a little much for the two casuals you have in the group. I haven't been to Bandon (yet), but from what I have heard the place is a golf mecca. My experience with casuals is they get bored/disinterested after so much golf and would rather do other things. And I don't get the impression that Bandon has a lot of non-golf things to offer. - Casuals also seem to get bored/tired if you try to cram 36 holes into one day (I know you're not, this is more of a warning if you pivot and decide to play 36). I've had casual guys basically stop playing or stop trying during the second 18 of the day. So if you're trying to run some sort team match (like a Ryder Cup style match), it can be frustrating to the rest who are counting on them for a team match - To add to the previous comment, Bandon is probably too difficult for higher handicappers. Meaning they will get frustrated, and probably quickly. It also can take a strain on the other guys in your group if you end up having to search for golf balls constantly. We made the mistake of doing the yearly trip at Turning Stone one year, and those courses ate the casuals alive. I found it difficult to concentrate on my own game because I had to stop sometimes 2-3 times PER HOLE to help one of the guys (35 handicap) look for his ball in the heather grass. As your guys are probably locked in for the trip, I think your only job now is to make sure they understand and have realistic expectations.
  5. I've really gotten to like the Callaway Jaws line of wedges. My last few replacements have maintained that brand.
  6. That's why I'm still rocking my Titleist 915D. And I got that used in 2016 for $180.
  7. Does winning the "A" flight (one flight below the official championship flight) count? If yes, then I did it at my old club in 2017. If no, then I'll see myself out
  8. I played on January 1 this year, so I can at least check the box for January in my quest to play at least once every month. We have 10 inches of snow on the ground this morning, so who knows if I'll get that February checkbox.
  9. The semi-private is a great way to ramp up to an eventual private membership. And who knows, your mileage with it may vary from mine.
  10. I've only played TPC and Bali. I enjoyed both. But if my memory serves me correctly, I only paid in the $100-$175 for each of the rounds. Probably because it was back in 2012 when I last played them. I can see why people are polarized by Bali. I kinda digged it though, because it's a little different than a lot of courses. I'm guessing people don't like it as much because the holes almost feel "artificial" for lack of a better word. TPC was the better course of the two.
  11. That sounds like a semi-private membership, not fully private, am I correct? I'll respond as though it is a semi-private membership. I've had experience with both types. The upsides to the semi-private membership is the price is almost always better than private (obviously). If all you really care about is playing golf, and nothing else, it's the way to go. The downsides are that in the end, it's really just a pre-paid public course membership, and at least from my experience it was much more difficult to get the wife and family interested/engaged (I'll get to that more in a minute). I was a member at a semi-private for three seasons from 2016-2018. Pricing was similar to what you described. At times it felt like those "preferred tee times" weren't all that "preferred". They were bringing in outside tournaments a lot, and I understand it helps keep my cost down, but they started having the tournaments on weekend mornings at times. So us members were getting locked out of the course. Their answer was "well, just come back and make a tee time for 1:00 in the afternoon". The other thing I will say is even though my wife could have come out and played with me, she rarely did because rounds were painfully slow. All the public play clogged the course up pretty regularly. It wasn't until we joined a private club that my wife got very interested in playing golf. Now she plays 70-80 rounds a season. Probably because it's easier for her to meet other members, have a regular group, and pace of play is much better. I only bring this up because it might be a factor in how interested your family is in the membership.
  12. I gave up on chasing big distance many years ago. I mean, I could have looked into one of the swing speed training programs, but I'm not convinced that would make my game all that better. And I fear something like that would just be asking to hurt my back. I value accuracy over distance. But I'm also not chasing elite players on the Tour either. I'm happy playing tees between 6000 and 6700 yards. Your big hitting friend that you described above - I love playing against those guys. They're gonna get a couple big ones here and there and probably beat me on a hole or two. But eventually they swing too hard and send it over to the next county. There's a guy in my league who's like that. He blows it by me off the tee regularly, but completely falls apart on 80 yards and in. If he could get his short game together, and keep hitting it big, he'd destroy me.
  13. A friend of mine had a heart transplant. He's 51, got it when he was 46. I think he was out of commission for a couple months, but he's back on the course full-force nowadays. He has to take rejection drugs each day, and he's become a bit of workout fiend in order to remain healthy. But his golf game is fine.
  14. One of my old college professors used to say "when shaking hands, no dead fish!"
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