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Do Drivers With Smaller Heads Hit The Ball Farther?


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From 1990 to about 2007 I played with the same irons and woods: Golden Ram Vibration Matched irons 1-SW and the woods were the old Taylor Made Tour Preferred metal woods from 1990--remember those gray heads? The driver head is about 190cc. In my prime (1995) my drives averaged about 250 and the longest I ever hit the ball was 290. In a tournament I played in 1999, one of my colleagues bet that I could not hit the ball farther than 250, because he thought I was missing out on technology. (At the time, a typical high-tech driver was the Callaway Great Big Bertha.) I took him up on the challenge and measured my longest drives. I measured seven drives and five of them were 250, and two of them were 270! I remember swinging 100% on those drives and the ball I used was a Titleist DT-90, a Surlyn-covered distance ball. I struck the ball very well that day.

 

Fast-forward to 2007, when I finally decided to give Titanium heads a try. My first titanium driver I bought was a Callaway FT-5. I did not like the length of the drivers (45") because the accuracy was compromised, so I cut the driver down to 43", which has been the length I had always used, and today I still prefer that length. I do like the larger sweet spot, and my misses were going a little bit longer, so gradually I built my collection. I can see on my rack I now have seven titanium drivers, and all but one of them (the 983K) are 460cc.

 

Sometimes I play retro days at the local muni and I use the old equipment. I know my usual spots from the fairway with the 460cc drivers, and keep in mind that all my drivers are 43" with the exception of one (Ping G5, which is 45"). (The Ping driver goes farther, yes, but accuracy is compromised, so I only use that driver for courses with wide fairways.) Going back to the trusty old 1990 Taylor Made Burner, I belted one almost thirty years longer, and on average the rest of the drives were a little longer than with the 460cc heads. I am coming to the conclusion that the smaller the head, the more clubhead speed it generates because it whips through the air faster.

 

I am looking at my drivers and remembering my longest drives with each of them for the past couple years. My longest came from the 1990 Taylor Made Burner (190cc), and the second longest came from a Hogan Apex persimmon (190cc). I am coming to the conclusion that in order to hit the ball farther with the 460 cc heads, it will be absolutely necessary to lengthen the shafts and play them at 45", because I reckon that it is the only way to generate clubhead speed to offset the 460cc head moving more slowly in the air. True?

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The air resistance thing is very small, there may be a smidge more resistance with a bigger head but not enough to outweigh the benefits. This is a chicken and egg type argument. I could argue a bigger head allows me to “go at it” with bigger confidence. I know the mishits wont be as punished as bad. Unless your a superb ball striker, a larger head provides so much more forgiveness and a better overall ball flight. If both drivers are stuck on its bullseye, i would imagine you wouldnt see much difference to be honest. Its just a matter of how often thats gonna happen. Same thing with the longer shaft. Overall i think the newer stuff gives you the best overall potential averages.

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OEM's would argue LOL. My 74 FIL hits a mini slider. On my off days, he can hit it as far as my Rogue. On good days I'll fly him a bit. So he wanted to try again with a 460 head. Went out and bought a Rogue. He literally couldn't hit the ball. When he did it wasn't as far as his mini. I've tried over the years buying him 3 different drivers for Xmas. He just can't play a standard driver. He's done trying.

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Sometimes I play retro days at the local muni and I use the old equipment. I know my usual spots from the fairway with the 460cc drivers, and keep in mind that all my drivers are 43" with the exception of one (Ping G5, which is 45"). (The Ping driver goes farther, yes, but accuracy is compromised, so I only use that driver for courses with wide fairways.) Going back to the trusty old 1990 Taylor Made Burner, I belted one almost thirty years longer, and on average the rest of the drives were a little longer than with the 460cc heads. I am coming to the conclusion that the smaller the head, the more clubhead speed it generates because it whips through the air faster.

 

I am looking at my drivers and remembering my longest drives with each of them for the past couple years. My longest came from the 1990 Taylor Made Burner (190cc), and the second longest came from a Hogan Apex persimmon (190cc). I am coming to the conclusion that in order to hit the ball farther with the 460 cc heads, it will be absolutely necessary to lengthen the shafts and play them at 45", because I reckon that it is the only way to generate clubhead speed to offset the 460cc head moving more slowly in the air. True?

 

This is easy enough to verify.

 

Go somewhere with a launch monitor that measures clubhead speed and swing away. You'll find out which club you swing the fastest.

 

That said, here's something to consider.

 

What is the total weight of the different clubs? There are lots of people who swing a slightly heavier driver FASTER than a lighter one because of the feedback that it gives. If you have cut down all of your drivers to 43" it's possible that the newer ones have become to light for you to swing them fast.

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Unlikely a significant amount. Maybe a couple of mph difference so maybe 1/2" of length to "compensate". But that's just a guess. A simple test can help shed some light on the question (at least for your swing - results will vary a lot for different people with different swings).

 

Go to any local retailer with a LM that measures club head speed. Grab a Callaway driver and one of the 3wd models with an adjustable hosel. Go hit the 3wd and keep track of the club head speed. Then pull the shaft out of the fairway and use the same shaft in the driver head - now go check out the swing speed with the bigger driver head. Some lead tape may be needed to get the SW's to a similar feel for a more accurate test.

 

I choose Callaway because they tend to have the same BBGM for their drivers and fairways so that will keep the playing length the same. You can do the same with other OEM's (such as TM or cobra) as long as they use the same adapter for both fairways and drivers (rules out Titleist) and you compensate for playing length differences in the different heads.

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Sometimes I play retro days at the local muni and I use the old equipment. I know my usual spots from the fairway with the 460cc drivers, and keep in mind that all my drivers are 43" with the exception of one (Ping G5, which is 45"). (The Ping driver goes farther, yes, but accuracy is compromised, so I only use that driver for courses with wide fairways.) Going back to the trusty old 1990 Taylor Made Burner, I belted one almost thirty years longer, and on average the rest of the drives were a little longer than with the 460cc heads. I am coming to the conclusion that the smaller the head, the more clubhead speed it generates because it whips through the air faster.

 

I am looking at my drivers and remembering my longest drives with each of them for the past couple years. My longest came from the 1990 Taylor Made Burner (190cc), and the second longest came from a Hogan Apex persimmon (190cc). I am coming to the conclusion that in order to hit the ball farther with the 460 cc heads, it will be absolutely necessary to lengthen the shafts and play them at 45", because I reckon that it is the only way to generate clubhead speed to offset the 460cc head moving more slowly in the air. True?

 

This is easy enough to verify.

 

Go somewhere with a launch monitor that measures clubhead speed and swing away. You'll find out which club you swing the fastest.

 

That said, here's something to consider.

 

What is the total weight of the different clubs? There are lots of people who swing a slightly heavier driver FASTER than a lighter one because of the feedback that it gives. If you have cut down all of your drivers to 43" it's possible that the newer ones have become to light for you to swing them fast.

 

 

I know this could be at least partially responsible for my swinging a 43.25" steel shafted driver faster than a 90g graphite driver at 44"+.

 

Amusingly, the graphite stick is 450cc, the shorter steel shafted club is a persimmon. There's that size difference thing again. LOL

The Ever Changing Bag!  A lot of mixing and matching
Driver: TM Original One 11.5* set to 10*, Aldila RIP Alpha 80 X, 43.5"
3w:  Cobra King LTD, Matrix 8m3 X, 42"
Hybrid:  TaylorMade Stage 2 Tour, NV105 S or DGS400

Irons grab bag:  3-PW Mizuno MP37, Recoil Proto 125 F4 (reshaft pending); 1-PW Golden Ram TW282 or Vibration Matched Golden Rams, RIP Tour 115 R (coin flipping for the reshaft project); 1i & 3-PW Golden Ram TW276, NV105 S
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Putter:  Snake Eyes Viper Tour Sv1, 34"
Balls: Wilson Staff Duo Professional or TaylorMade TP5

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I think it's dependent on your skill and swing. The lighter weight could increase swing speeds for those who are lacking but traditionally manufacturers seem to focus the smaller heads on better players with higher swing speeds.

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Woods - XXIO 10 3W
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Sometimes I play retro days at the local muni and I use the old equipment. I know my usual spots from the fairway with the 460cc drivers, and keep in mind that all my drivers are 43" with the exception of one (Ping G5, which is 45"). (The Ping driver goes farther, yes, but accuracy is compromised, so I only use that driver for courses with wide fairways.) Going back to the trusty old 1990 Taylor Made Burner, I belted one almost thirty years longer, and on average the rest of the drives were a little longer than with the 460cc heads. I am coming to the conclusion that the smaller the head, the more clubhead speed it generates because it whips through the air faster.

 

I am looking at my drivers and remembering my longest drives with each of them for the past couple years. My longest came from the 1990 Taylor Made Burner (190cc), and the second longest came from a Hogan Apex persimmon (190cc). I am coming to the conclusion that in order to hit the ball farther with the 460 cc heads, it will be absolutely necessary to lengthen the shafts and play them at 45", because I reckon that it is the only way to generate clubhead speed to offset the 460cc head moving more slowly in the air. True?

 

This is easy enough to verify.

 

Go somewhere with a launch monitor that measures clubhead speed and swing away. You'll find out which club you swing the fastest.

 

That said, here's something to consider.

 

What is the total weight of the different clubs? There are lots of people who swing a slightly heavier driver FASTER than a lighter one because of the feedback that it gives. If you have cut down all of your drivers to 43" it's possible that the newer ones have become to light for you to swing them fast.

 

To add to this point - I would ask the OP: in trimming your drivers down to 43", have you balanced out the swingweight when you do so? You mentioned at least one driver being 45" to start, and considering that the majority of drivers in the last few years are stock built at 45.5" or greater.....taking 2 or more inches off would require a considerable amount of weight needing added to the head to get the swingweight back to around where it started. If you don't do anything to compensate, then it comes back to what a few people have already commented on - you very well might not swing these clubs as fast due to lack of head weight you would normally be feeling.

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Ping G410 3H 19*, Tour AD-DI 85s Hyb

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A few thoughts on this:

 

You've been playing since early 90's, you've developed a swing to match the gear of the day.Guys who started 10+ years later tend to have a different type of swing.

 

I see benefit in heavier irons and metals too. My King Cobra #5 from 1996 is still there. Club is money for must make tee shots. Modern Ti #3 & #1 are bane to bag.

 

Stuart G.gave some good advice. My most consistent (highest FIR) Ti Driver came from OEM with their #3 (84g) spec shaft. Though all time distance king and most enjoyable is still the 390 cc TM R510 DF which is the best of both old and new, I've come across.

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The fastest club head speed when I practice on flight scope or trackman at the local shop is always my 983E 45" fubuki 63x. 203head weight. For raw distance number this head wins for me. Epic m3440 f8plus are a little behind in chs. They are all within a couple grams of each other and all within a 1/4 inch in length. Its nothing drastic 2mph at most. I feel like I can hit the button every swing with that 350cc 983E, when you miss you get some spinny results. Could just be confidence with the head.

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This is easy enough to verify.

 

Go somewhere with a launch monitor that measures clubhead speed and swing away. You'll find out which club you swing the fastest.

 

That said, here's something to consider.

 

What is the total weight of the different clubs? There are lots of people who swing a slightly heavier driver FASTER than a lighter one because of the feedback that it gives. If you have cut down all of your drivers to 43" it's possible that the newer ones have become to light for you to swing them fast.

 

As Jack Nicklaus said, the only way to make the ball go farther is to make the clubhead go faster.

 

Although I am an amateur clubmaker, I actually do have a swingweight and overall weight scale, and up until now I have been too lazy or disinterested in swingweighting any of my existing equipment. Now is the time, and I am very curious of what I have.

 

This was the first time ever I have swingweighted my trusty driver, the 1990 Taylor Made Burner driver with a Dynamic Gold S300U shaft, 43". This is the one I used in my prime, and still today, though I am older, I can hit the ball about 250 yards here at sea level. Here are the results:

 

Swingweight: D2

Overall weight: 13.25 oz.

 

So the goal is simply to match the other drivers to this swingweight and overall weight?

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To add to this point - I would ask the OP: in trimming your drivers down to 43", have you balanced out the swingweight when you do so? You mentioned at least one driver being 45" to start, and considering that the majority of drivers in the last few years are stock built at 45.5" or greater.....taking 2 or more inches off would require a considerable amount of weight needing added to the head to get the swingweight back to around where it started. If you don't do anything to compensate, then it comes back to what a few people have already commented on - you very well might not swing these clubs as fast due to lack of head weight you would normally be feeling.

 

No, I did not balance out the swingweight, but evidently I should have. For the FT-5 driver, which came with its stock Fujikura shaft, I merely cut down 2" from the butt end and the resulting driver had good results, or at least I thought. I just swingweighted the FT-5 and here are the results.

 

Swingweight: C6

Overall weight: 11 3/8 oz.

 

It seems much easier to hit the ball with this driver, given the shorter shaft and large sweet spot, but I do think this does not go far as my old trusty, and evidently I now know why. When I cut this driver down, I did not have a swingweight scale at the time; I just cut it and put a grip on and swung away. That is a graphite shaft. Most others were heads that were pulled off and I had a clubmaker put in a Dynamic Gold S330U shaft on it and had it trimmed to 43".

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When hit on the screws, yes. Larger clubs often have larger mass distribution, vs a smaller club which will have more of its mass in a smaller, more concentrated area.

 

You’d have to hit a nail a lot harder with a frying pan in order to get the same result as hitting it with a hammer unless you hit it in the correct spot, which is harder to find in a frying pan than it is with a hammer.

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I just swingweighted my Titleist 983K, one of my best titanium drivers.

 

Swingweight: D2

Overall weight: 13 3/8 oz.

 

This club has a Dynamic Gold S300U shaft and performs almost identical to my old Taylor Made Burner. The swing weight and overall weight are nearly identical. It also has a smaller head than a 460cc driver, so maybe this driver also whips through the air faster with its slightly smaller head? It should, but none of my longest drives the past two years came from this driver, but the ones with the smaller heads.

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When hit on the screws, yes. Larger clubs often have larger mass distribution, vs a smaller club which will have more of its mass in a smaller, more concentrated area.

 

You’d have to hit a nail a lot harder with a frying pan in order to get the same result as hitting it with a hammer unless you hit it in the correct spot, which is harder to find in a frying pan than it is with a hammer.

 

That is a wonderful analogy! I never thought of it this way. Looking back at my missed shots with the 460cc heads, I suspect that the sweet spot is actually not as large as you think it is, versus with a smaller head, which forces you to find the sweet spot through hard work.

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When hit on the screws, yes. Larger clubs often have larger mass distribution, vs a smaller club which will have more of its mass in a smaller, more concentrated area.

 

You’d have to hit a nail a lot harder with a frying pan in order to get the same result as hitting it with a hammer unless you hit it in the correct spot, which is harder to find in a frying pan than it is with a hammer.

 

Not sure this is best example. If the frying pan has a “springlike” effect then all that mass spread out vs the hammer may not matter. Im not saying the smaller heads couldnt keep up when hit on the bullseye, but i would highly doubt being longer- a smaller head with todays tech, it would be pretty close- but a smaller head from 3 decades ago- no

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Sometimes I play retro days at the local muni and I use the old equipment. I know my usual spots from the fairway with the 460cc drivers, and keep in mind that all my drivers are 43" with the exception of one (Ping G5, which is 45"). (The Ping driver goes farther, yes, but accuracy is compromised, so I only use that driver for courses with wide fairways.) Going back to the trusty old 1990 Taylor Made Burner, I belted one almost thirty years longer, and on average the rest of the drives were a little longer than with the 460cc heads. I am coming to the conclusion that the smaller the head, the more clubhead speed it generates because it whips through the air faster.

 

I think if you are defying the space/time continuum with any driver you should stick with it, no matter how "old".

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This is easy enough to verify.

 

Go somewhere with a launch monitor that measures clubhead speed and swing away. You'll find out which club you swing the fastest.

 

That said, here's something to consider.

 

What is the total weight of the different clubs? There are lots of people who swing a slightly heavier driver FASTER than a lighter one because of the feedback that it gives. If you have cut down all of your drivers to 43" it's possible that the newer ones have become to light for you to swing them fast.

 

As Jack Nicklaus said, the only way to make the ball go farther is to make the clubhead go faster.

 

Although I am an amateur clubmaker, I actually do have a swingweight and overall weight scale, and up until now I have been too lazy or disinterested in swingweighting any of my existing equipment. Now is the time, and I am very curious of what I have.

 

This was the first time ever I have swingweighted my trusty driver, the 1990 Taylor Made Burner driver with a Dynamic Gold S300U shaft, 43". This is the one I used in my prime, and still today, though I am older, I can hit the ball about 250 yards here at sea level. Here are the results:

 

Swingweight: D2

Overall weight: 13.25 oz.

 

So the goal is simply to match the other drivers to this swingweight and overall weight?

 

I'll give the "it depends" answer.

 

I am more sensitive to total weight than swingweight.

 

If you want to experiment, you could try adding weight to the short, graphite shafted head until you get it to D2 or D3 and see how it compares. One of the issues with that is that overall balance will be very different from the steel shafted driver even though they are the same swingweight.

 

A better experiment would be to try a heavier (75g) shaft at 44" or maybe 44.5" to see how that plays.

Cobra SZ 9* : Ventus Blue 6-S

Cobra F9 Tour 4W : Tour AD TP 8-S

Cobra ForgedTec 3-iron : Nippon Modus3 105-S

Srixon Z785 4-PW : Nippon Modus3 120-S

Cleveland RTX3 50, 54, 58 : Nippon 115-S Wedge

Piretti Potenza 370g : Breakthrough Technology Stability Shaft - 34"

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The air resistance thing is very small, there may be a smidge more resistance with a bigger head but not enough to outweigh the benefits. This is a chicken and egg type argument. I could argue a bigger head allows me to "go at it" with bigger confidence. I know the mishits wont be as punished as bad. Unless your a superb ball striker, a larger head provides so much more forgiveness and a better overall ball flight. If both drivers are stuck on its bullseye, i would imagine you wouldnt see much difference to be honest. Its just a matter of how often thats gonna happen. Same thing with the longer shaft. Overall i think the newer stuff gives you the best overall potential averages.

 

Your statement of, "If both drivers are struck on the bullseye"... Says it all. Many people have a harder time hitting the bullseye with a longer shafted driver. OEM's create drivers with longer shafts for swing speed, which creates longer drives when hit on the bullseye. Pro's all use shorter shafts for accuracy. They don't need or want longer shafts. 6'3" Bubba Watson hits a 44.75" driver.

 

I see what the OP is talking about. A smaller head with a shorter shafts will result in more center hits, and that will get you more consistent distance. I hit my 3 wood more often than my driver for accuracy, and I hit it just as far in most cases. On Flight Scope, I have the same swing speed with my 3/4 wood as I do my driver. When I'm "on" with the driver, and hitting the bullseye consistently, I will use it more often because the 7 degrees of loft difference will get me more distance.

Driver: Ping G410
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5W: Cleveland Launcher HB
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OEM's would argue LOL. My 74 FIL hits a mini slider. On my off days, he can hit it as far as my Rogue. On good days I'll fly him a bit. So he wanted to try again with a 460 head. Went out and bought a Rogue. He literally couldn't hit the ball. When he did it wasn't as far as his mini. I've tried over the years buying him 3 different drivers for Xmas. He just can't play a standard driver. He's done trying.

You've bought your father-in-law three drivers??? Please tell me FIL means "Friend in Louisiana" or something.

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When hit on the screws, yes. Larger clubs often have larger mass distribution, vs a smaller club which will have more of its mass in a smaller, more concentrated area.

 

You’d have to hit a nail a lot harder with a frying pan in order to get the same result as hitting it with a hammer unless you hit it in the correct spot, which is harder to find in a frying pan than it is with a hammer.

 

Not sure this is best example. If the frying pan has a “springlike” effect then all that mass spread out vs the hammer may not matter. Im not saying the smaller heads couldnt keep up when hit on the bullseye, but i would highly doubt being longer- a smaller head with todays tech, it would be pretty close- but a smaller head from 3 decades ago- no

 

Pretty perfect analogy in my opinion.

 

 

Op. To this day the longest drive in comp or in all out practice I’ve ever hit is the yonex 380cc head I had with a whiteboard 73x at 44 inches. I don’t say the length. But I hit two one day that were substantially longer than anything I’ve ever hit. And I’m talking all carry up a hill. We saw them land and die. It’s also the highest swing speed recorded for me by 4 mph ( not on the same day ). Eventually cracked that head and never searched out another.

 

I’m absolutely convinced that smaller is faster.

 

Heck. I can swing my current 3 wood as fast as my driver.( trackman verified) 3 wood is 42.5 and driver 43 1/4. And yes. Tons of weight added to the rogue to play it that length.

 

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TM RBZ 14* Addi 8x 

Ping g410 17.5* synergy blue 70TX 

Miura MC-501 3-Pw modus 130x 

Artisan 53 59 modus 130s 

Cameron GSS 009  1.5 , sound slot , tungsten sole weights , head speed shaft. 

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I feel I can hit a smaller headed driver farther because I can control the face position better, and hit it straighter.

Straight 250 is longer than crooked 260.

 

I'm a fader and have a hard time closing the face on a 460 head.

 

My small headed driver choice - Cobra SS 350 from 2005ish.

PING Rapture(OG) 10.5 driver
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Cobra Pro hybrids 18 & 23
Callaway '18 MB irons
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I see what the OP is talking about. A smaller head with a shorter shafts will result in more center hits, and that will get you more consistent distance. I hit my 3 wood more often than my driver for accuracy, and I hit it just as far in most cases. On Flight Scope, I have the same swing speed with my 3/4 wood as I do my driver. When I'm "on" with the driver, and hitting the bullseye consistently, I will use it more often because the 7 degrees of loft difference will get me more distance.

 

The discovery, I think, is that for a 460cc head, the sweet spot is not as big as you think it is. It is certainly a little bigger than a 190cc driver, but how much exactly I do not know. I reckon that one inch off the 460cc sweet spot will lose much distance. Maybe unconsciously, the larger clubface gives the golfer a false sense of confidence, that he can go harder at it and may divert himself away from the sweet spot. The smaller clubhead, combined with the shorter shaft, forces the golfer to take a more precise, controlled swing to deliver the smaller head to the ball. The hammer analogy makes much sense now.

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I’d love to see tollbros do a test with several 43 inch steel shafted drivers against several of today’s drivers at 43 , and wieghted appropriately . Coupled to his very consistent test swingers we could put it to bed pretty quick.

 

TM Sim Max 10.5 Ventus Red 6x 

TM RBZ 14* Addi 8x 

Ping g410 17.5* synergy blue 70TX 

Miura MC-501 3-Pw modus 130x 

Artisan 53 59 modus 130s 

Cameron GSS 009  1.5 , sound slot , tungsten sole weights , head speed shaft. 

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Have you thought about putting any of the mini drivers from a few years back into play? I still have 2 SLDR minis that i love.

Srixon z785 9.5* - EvenFlow Handcrafted Blue 65
Taylormade M3 HL - MFS5 White Tie 60S -0.75" (42.5")
Taylormade M4 19* - UST Proforce V2h R -0.5" (40.25")
Adams dHy 24* - Alida RIP Phenom 70g R 
Srixon 565 - 5-PW - 2* flat - Nippon Modus 120 S - Best Grips Classic -0.5"

Cleveland Zipcore Tour Rack 50*/54* mid, 58* low -0.5" - 2* flat 
Slighter Proto 1 #9/Del Mar design - High Toe - Long neck - Deep Milled face - 33", 370gr, lie 71*, loft 4*
Odyssey OWorks 2ball  33.5" - 1* loft - 71* lie
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I see what the OP is talking about. A smaller head with a shorter shafts will result in more center hits, and that will get you more consistent distance. I hit my 3 wood more often than my driver for accuracy, and I hit it just as far in most cases. On Flight Scope, I have the same swing speed with my 3/4 wood as I do my driver. When I'm "on" with the driver, and hitting the bullseye consistently, I will use it more often because the 7 degrees of loft difference will get me more distance.

 

The discovery, I think, is that for a 460cc head, the sweet spot is not as big as you think it is. It is certainly a little bigger than a 190cc driver, but how much exactly I do not know. I reckon that one inch off the 460cc sweet spot will lose much distance. Maybe unconsciously, the larger clubface gives the golfer a false sense of confidence, that he can go harder at it and may divert himself away from the sweet spot. The smaller clubhead, combined with the shorter shaft, forces the golfer to take a more precise, controlled swing to deliver the smaller head to the ball. The hammer analogy makes much sense now.

 

Yeah, I get that, but if swing has to be "more precise, controlled swing to deliver the smaller head to the ball". you are sacrificing club head speed that equates to REAL distance gains. I think the point of the bigger high MOI drivers with more COR across more of the face is that you can "go after it" all the time?

 

If you hit it dead solid with a harder swing it will go farther, and if you miss dead solid slightly the increased MOI will help keep it online with minimal distance loss. You "go after it" with a smaller, lesser MOI club and hit it dead solid the results are comparable. Now you "go after it" with that smaller head and miss by the same amount as the bigger head you are REALLY getting penalized on both distance/accuracy.

 

In summary, if COR is the same and you make a swing with the same SS and contact location, distance is probably the same. You miss by just a little, you are better off with the bigger head. And keep mind I'm talking club head size only, assuming both have the same L/L/L. Also, I also suffer from closing the face with bigger drivers as someone else mentioned, so when I absolutely NEED to hit it straight I pull my 320cc Ping TiSi Tec with a 43" graphite shaft :)!

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I feel I can hit a smaller headed driver farther because I can control the face position better, and hit it straighter.

Straight 250 is longer than crooked 260.

 

I'm a fader and have a hard time closing the face on a 460 head.

 

My small headed driver choice - Cobra SS 350 from 2005ish.

 

This is most of the reason. It’s easier to hit square. A 460cc head is a million times harder to square up for me than a 3 wood. Or small driver.

 

Example. I have an old Ram driver. Metal head that’s snaller than my 3 wood. I absolutely can murder this thing. Never ever hitting that high right miss. It’s like hitting a GI 4 iron from a tee peg. Just can’t miss. Give me a 460cc head same shaft length and I’ll block 1-2 out of 10 even on the range. It’s like playing Russian roulette every round.

 

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