Jump to content

How coming from money helps guys reach the tour..


Recommended Posts

Money helps because it gives players more opportunity. It can also help if you're a decent talent with a decent mentality for the game by being able to focus on golf instead of having to work a job and try to practice and play.

 

Working with Tour players, I find you get the following types that make the Tour.

 

1. The stud golfer that has been a stud golfer since they were in their early teens. They seemed destined for Tour life, they got into a great college program, they were going to get plenty of support once they turned pro and in no time they were on the Tour.

 

 

2. The player that has marginal golf skills, but has a great mentality to be a Tour player. They have the utmost faith in themselves and round-in and round-out seem to trust their talent more than the rest of the golfers. And they turn those 71's for every other golfer into 69's somehow, some way.. Ben Crane is a great example of this. He's probably got the best attitude and mentality for the game of any golfer I have ever come across.

 

 

3. The player that either out-athletes the field or just has ridiculous hand-to-eye coordination. They can somehow work a double shift at the bag drop in 100 degree heat and not touch a club in a week and go out and start flushing the ball like it's nothing. From a mentality stand point, they may not be as polished as others, but their pure talent to take time away from golf and swing the club like they had been beating 1,000 balls a day for the past month gets them tot he next level when they get the chance to actually hit some balls and not have to work. Pat Perez reminds me of this type of player.

 

 

4. The player that has some decent skills and has a decent mentality, but comes from a lot of money and all they have to do is play and practice golf and get opportunity after opportunity to go to Tour Q-Schools, get into tournaments that they have little business being in. Of course, you have to have some form of talent and have some form of the mentality to be a Tour player. Usually these players have the ability to pick up new things and use them to get better than most other golfers.

 

 

I do think the Tour has made it more difficult for the Tommy Gainey's of the world to get on Tour and I think that is to their detriment. It takes more money and it's more of a risk to try and develop a career into a PGA Tour carer. And guys with less money are kinda left out of the loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 275
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Travel hockey parents would like you to consider their investment.

Deep talent, desire and work ethic is waaaay more important.   Look up all the stories of guys who hit balls in the backyard, garage into mattress, etc.   If you have the game people will back you, t

> @Fairways_and_Greens said: > > @RichieHunt said: > > > > > 2. The player that has marginal golf skills, but has a great mentality to be a Tour player. They have the

Richie. Glad to see a person in The know acknowledge that #3 exists. Some refuse to believe that.

Cobra King SZ 10.8* Fuji Atmos Black 6x

TM RBZ tour 14* ADDI 8x 

TM gapr tour 3 iron 21*Evenflow blue 6.5 

Mizuno MP20 4hmb 5-6mmc 7-PW MB Fuji pro tour spec 115x 

Ping Glide 3.0 50 54 60 Fuji pro 115S 

cameron GSS 009 1.5 - sound slot - tungesten sole weights 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites
One more thing...people say Jack didn't grow up with wealth...I guess it's all relative, especially these days, but here was an article about his "range ball fees" at the country club where he learned to play the game. FWIW, $3300 was the average ANNUAL income in 1950...so $300 was a boatload of cash back then.

 

https://www.golf.com...ce-range-bills/

 

If you believe that story, I have a bridge I can sell ya. Jack, is great. But take his stories and lessons with a grain of salt. He uses a psychology that few understand but it's a good amount of smoke and mirrors at the top.

 

Please sell me a bridge! The guy is retired...not sure what he would have to gain by embellishing this story.

Link to post
Share on other sites
One more thing...people say Jack didn't grow up with wealth...I guess it's all relative, especially these days, but here was an article about his "range ball fees" at the country club where he learned to play the game. FWIW, $3300 was the average ANNUAL income in 1950...so $300 was a boatload of cash back then.

 

https://www.golf.com...ce-range-bills/

 

If you believe that story, I have a bridge I can sell ya. Jack, is great. But take his stories and lessons with a grain of salt. He uses a psychology that few understand but it's a good amount of smoke and mirrors at the top.

 

Please sell me a bridge! The guy is retired...not sure what he would have to gain by embellishing this story.

 

Yep! He said 50+ years ago when his memory was pretty good, lol, that he was hitting a dozen buckets just on Fridays, plus hitting buckets of balls before and after he played golf the other days of the week - could easily hit 200 or more buckets a month pretty easily, let alone other stuff he was charging at the club - $300 on a really big month wouldn't be all that surprising, but who knows.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Richie. Glad to see a person in The know acknowledge that #3 exists. Some refuse to believe that.

 

DJ reminds me of prime example of #3.

 

Eh, I was thinking more of Pat Perez. I think Pat would probably tell us that his mentality on the course isn't always the best. But the guy didn't get to play and practice a lot because of his household economics, won the Western Amateur with his neighbor's Ping Eye 2 irons, had to work some sales jobs and blistered the mini-tour and despite a bad car crash and having to adjust his swing, he was on Tour in short order.

 

DJ didn't have to really work a job as a teenager as his family was doing pretty well for itself. He was sort of a late bloomer with not the best academics and ended up going to CCU. By the time he finished at CCU, he was one of the very best collegiate players.

 

He's not an analytical thinker and his technical knowledge of the golf swing could probably be fit into a thimble. But, I do think he's always had the mentality to play on Tour. He just doesn't over-think things which is something that more Tour players could probably use to their benefit.

 

A player with decent talent and the mentality on the course that Pat Perez can have at times, may not make it on the Tour.

 

I think a prime example of this is John Daly who has had epic meltdowns on the course and has had a troubled life, yet was so talented he was able to overcome it and win 2 majors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

 

I'm pretty sure that Jack's dad owned a small chain of pharmacies (while being a pharmacist himself).

 

Back in those days, it was not unusual for a pharmacy to be a variety store of sorts. Almost like a very miniature version of Target.

 

I think Jack's dad was probably as wealthy as your regular, successful small-to-mid range business owner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

 

I'm pretty sure that Jack's dad owned a small chain of pharmacies (while being a pharmacist himself).

 

Back in those days, it was not unusual for a pharmacy to be a variety store of sorts. Almost like a very miniature version of Target.

 

I think Jack's dad was probably as wealthy as your regular, successful small-to-mid range business owner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

 

That would be correct, back then more pharmacists owned their own stores and were businessmen than today. Now most work for the big chains or hospitals. My point is that he was comfortable enough to belong to a country club but not mega rich.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two examples out of hundreds of pros. "Coming from money" seems to be your idea of wealthy parents and a very limited and somewhat biased opinion - big difference between "coming from money" and figuring out how to come up with the money, which is what lots of parents/aspiring pros go through. And yes, it takes money.

There are more than two examples of players coming from money. Those two i mentioned are on the extreme level of financial luxury , but the tour is full of private country club kids .

 

Again, money is needed and your bias is clear.

What is my bias ??? I am not condemning them for coming from money.

 

All sports take money, NBA isn't full of kids who played AAU all over the country? Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Kobe Bryant, Trae Young, Luka Doncic all are "country club kids"

Lol there is zero comparison, many NBA players literally come from public housing and legit poverty. Comparing them to pro golfers is laughable. Steph Curry's dad was an NBA star, he's not exactly the norm.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

 

I'm pretty sure that Jack's dad owned a small chain of pharmacies (while being a pharmacist himself).

 

Back in those days, it was not unusual for a pharmacy to be a variety store of sorts. Almost like a very miniature version of Target.

 

I think Jack's dad was probably as wealthy as your regular, successful small-to-mid range business owner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

 

As mentioned earlier from the time Jack was 2 until he turned 20, his dad started with one heavily leveraged pharmacy and turned it into 4, one of which he co-owned with a brother, 2 of which he sold to employees. Not a chain but a true success story for sure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
One more thing...people say Jack didn't grow up with wealth...I guess it's all relative, especially these days, but here was an article about his "range ball fees" at the country club where he learned to play the game. FWIW, $3300 was the average ANNUAL income in 1950...so $300 was a boatload of cash back then.

 

https://www.golf.com...ce-range-bills/

 

If you believe that story, I have a bridge I can sell ya. Jack, is great. But take his stories and lessons with a grain of salt. He uses a psychology that few understand but it's a good amount of smoke and mirrors at the top.

 

Please sell me a bridge! The guy is retired...not sure what he would have to gain by embellishing this story.

 

Old people do that. Walked 5 miles uphill both ways

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried to read through the posts, but we're talking golf & guess what? It is a very expensive sport. No if, ands or buts.

 

There are outliers and those from very different socio-economic backgrounds, but I look at those in the PGA and if you really dig deep the Master Pitch, Putt & Drive and they are very much typically affluent people.

 

Good for those who come from more humble beginnings, but lets face it, getting involved in golf is such a small # to begin with, and usually is a result of Mom & Dad being members of the country club.

 

We have a family friend whose son played (and captained) a US Division 1 team. They spent hundreds of thousands on his golf, his Florida golf schools and such. He is a member of an ultra-exclusive club, has a website, gofundme page & has competed around the world. He still has a chance, but it is a long slog and fortunately a family that supports him.

 

But damn right it is about the money.....

 

Stop this coming up with exceptions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

 

I'm pretty sure that Jack's dad owned a small chain of pharmacies (while being a pharmacist himself).

 

Back in those days, it was not unusual for a pharmacy to be a variety store of sorts. Almost like a very miniature version of Target.

 

I think Jack's dad was probably as wealthy as your regular, successful small-to-mid range business owner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

 

That would be correct, back then more pharmacists owned their own stores and were businessmen than today. Now most work for the big chains or hospitals. My point is that he was comfortable enough to belong to a country club but not mega rich.

 

That and the initiation at Scioto today is roughly $60K. I'm sure it was a different course back then, but I'm guessing its members were quite affluent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RH

Link to post
Share on other sites
Football and basketball are the two sports where it takes less money. In football you can't teach size and speed. Basketball you can play on a local court or gym somewhere. That is why there so many minorities at the highest levels in both. Many from very humble or very poor beginnings. In the USA, baseball now takes money for travel leagues. Same for hockey and some others. Golf still takes some money because at some point you are going to have to pay for green fees and likely lessons.
I'd argue against baseball requiring money seeing how many Dominican players make it to the big leagues from meager upbringings.

 

I think you missed the bolded part of his baseball comment. In the US, baseball has almost completely morphed into the "basketball AAU" format. The typical summer baseball leagues from little league to American Legion are dying on the vine, starting with the older kids and filtering down to little league now. Like golf, High School baseball is mostly meaningless when it comes to college/scholarship exposure. It's all about travel teams and tournaments. It's more efficient for College coaches and pro scouts to go to a tournament and see 20 players of interest against similar talent than to go to a high school game to watch 1 stud play against bad players. These travel teams start at a couple grand and go way up depending on where you live. In some metro areas, the desired teams charge $500+ non-refundable deposit just to try out!

 

There are different rules for international baseball players with respect to MLB. Teams set up baseball academies in these latin american countries and groom players from a very young age. They can also sign players internationally much younger than they can in the US. Here they have to wait until they graduate high school, over seas I think they can sign kids at 15 or 16. Forget which. These academies are similar to the Tennis/Golf ones here in the states except they don't cost anything to the kids and they include academic instruction as well I believe. It's a shame they don't do the same thing here in the states for low income kids.

 

Golf is oddly regionally specific at the junior level I think. Where I live, you'll have some CC kids that make up the area high school teams, but for the most part if you have a pulse and a set of clubs you'll make the team. They certainly aren't turning kids away. It's not competitive at all. A legit good player sticks out like a sore thumb until get to say the state tournament level.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Football and basketball are the two sports where it takes less money. In football you can't teach size and speed. Basketball you can play on a local court or gym somewhere. That is why there so many minorities at the highest levels in both. Many from very humble or very poor beginnings. In the USA, baseball now takes money for travel leagues. Same for hockey and some others. Golf still takes some money because at some point you are going to have to pay for green fees and likely lessons.
I'd argue against baseball requiring money seeing how many Dominican players make it to the big leagues from meager upbringings.

 

I think you missed the bolded part of his baseball comment. In the US, baseball has almost completely morphed into the "basketball AAU" format. The typical summer baseball leagues from little league to American Legion are dying on the vine, starting with the older kids and filtering down to little league now. Like golf, High School baseball is mostly meaningless when it comes to college/scholarship exposure. It's all about travel teams and tournaments. It's more efficient for College coaches and pro scouts to go to a tournament and see 20 players of interest against similar talent than to go to a high school game to watch 1 stud play against bad players. These travel teams start at a couple grand and go way up depending on where you live. In some metro areas, the desired teams charge $500+ non-refundable deposit just to try out!

 

There are different rules for international baseball players with respect to MLB. Teams set up baseball academies in these latin american countries and groom players from a very young age. They can also sign players internationally much younger than they can in the US. Here they have to wait until they graduate high school, over seas I think they can sign kids at 15 or 16. Forget which. These academies are similar to the Tennis/Golf ones here in the states except they don't cost anything to the kids and they include academic instruction as well I believe. It's a shame they don't do the same thing here in the states for low income kids.

 

Golf is oddly regionally specific at the junior level I think. Where I live, you'll have some CC kids that make up the area high school teams, but for the most part if you have a pulse and a set of clubs you'll make the team. They certainly aren't turning kids away. It's not competitive at all. A legit good player sticks out like a sore thumb until get to say the state tournament level.

 

Or they save money and just fly to the Dominican or Cuba.

And travel leagues that cost money have always existed to feed off of rich kids who think they are good. When they actually are not.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

> @RichieHunt said:

 

>

> 2. The player that has marginal golf skills, but has a great mentality to be a Tour player. They have the utmost faith in themselves and round-in and round-out seem to trust their talent more than the rest of the golfers. And they turn those 71's for every other golfer into 69's somehow, some way.. Ben Crane is a great example of this. He's probably got the best attitude and mentality for the game of any golfer I have ever come across.

>

Hey Richie. Could you expand on why you think Ben has the right mentality?

Epic Flash SZ 9° Kuro Kage DC tx
Epic Flash SZ 15° Kai'li x
Epic Flash 3H 19° Evenflow Black 6.5
Z765 4-G Modus3 125x
SM6 56°/60° Super Peening Blue
Spider X Chalk
Z Star XV

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Fairways_and_Greens said:

> > @RichieHunt said:

>

> >

> > 2. The player that has marginal golf skills, but has a great mentality to be a Tour player. They have the utmost faith in themselves and round-in and round-out seem to trust their talent more than the rest of the golfers. And they turn those 71's for every other golfer into 69's somehow, some way.. Ben Crane is a great example of this. He's probably got the best attitude and mentality for the game of any golfer I have ever come across.

> >

> Hey Richie. Could you expand on why you think Ben has the right mentality?

 

As Sara Dickson once wrote...everybody on Tour has talent, but the best players are those that trust their talent.

 

That describes Ben quite well. He has an incredible faith in himself and his abilities. He doesn't panic when he hasn't been playing well and he doesn't panic when he gets into contention. He doesn't try to play a different game, instead he looks to exploit his strengths and hopefully minimize his weaknesses. And the moment is never too big for him.

 

He's been able to use that to his advantage...mostly in keeping his eye on the prize. He doesn't get distracted by poor play or young guys bombing it 350 yards or getting into contention and wanting to win.

 

There's a lot more talented golfers out on Tour that haven't had nearly the success Ben has had. I think sometimes it gets overlooked because Ben is unafraid to laugh at himself. He also gets knocked for his slow play, but I've seen him play and while I won't confuse him for Lanny Wadkins or Mark Calcavecchia anytime soon, believe me...there's a lot of players...even prominent ones...that make him look like a speedster around the course.

 

And he's tried to improve his pace of play. Why? Because he doesn't want other players to not want to play with him. The other players...that are slower than he is...simply don't give a damn.

 

But in the end, he takes things in stride. And he doesn't allow his emotion...either good or bad...to sabotage the task at hand and the overall goal in the long run.

 

 

 

RH

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

> @SMcGavin1 said:

> J2putts wrote:

>

>

> Hawkeye77 wrote:

>

> J2putts wrote:

>

>

> Hawkeye77 wrote:

>

>

>

> Two examples out of hundreds of pros. "Coming from money" seems to be your idea of wealthy parents and a very limited and somewhat biased opinion - big difference between "coming from money" and figuring out how to come up with the money, which is what lots of parents/aspiring pros go through. And yes, it takes money.

>

>

>

>

> There are more than two examples of players coming from money. Those two i mentioned are on the extreme level of financial luxury , but the tour is full of private country club kids .

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Again, money is needed and your bias is clear.

>

>

>

> What is my bias ??? I am not condemning them for coming from money.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> All sports take money, NBA isn't full of kids who played AAU all over the country? Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Kobe Bryant, Trae Young, Luka Doncic all are "country club kids"

 

IDK about Trey or Luka, other 3 for sure. FWIW how look at it is access to specialized trainning, and sage guidance early. I doubt its a coincedence 5 pro's from Curry & Thompson families 6-7 kids.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @OrangeGravy said:

> J2putts wrote:

>

>

> herdman wrote:

>

> Football and basketball are the two sports where it takes less money. In football you can't teach size and speed. Basketball you can play on a local court or gym somewhere. That is why there so many minorities at the highest levels in both. Many from very humble or very poor beginnings. In the USA, baseball now takes money for travel leagues. Same for hockey and some others. Golf still takes some money because at some point you are going to have to pay for green fees and likely lessons.

>

>

>

> I'd argue against baseball requiring money seeing how many Dominican players make it to the big leagues from meager upbringings.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> I think you missed the bolded part of his baseball comment. In the US, baseball has almost completely morphed into the "basketball AAU" format. The typical summer baseball leagues from little league to American Legion are dying on the vine, starting with the older kids and filtering down to little league now. Like golf, High School baseball is mostly meaningless when it comes to college/scholarship exposure. It's all about travel teams and tournaments. It's more efficient for College coaches and pro scouts to go to a tournament and see 20 players of interest against similar talent than to go to a high school game to watch 1 stud play against bad players. These travel teams start at a couple grand and go way up depending on where you live. In some metro areas, the desired teams charge $500+ non-refundable deposit just to try out!

>

>

>

> There are different rules for international baseball players with respect to MLB. Teams set up baseball academies in these latin american countries and groom players from a very young age. They can also sign players internationally much younger than they can in the US. Here they have to wait until they graduate high school, over seas I think they can sign kids at 15 or 16. Forget which. These academies are similar to the Tennis/Golf ones here in the states except they don't cost anything to the kids and they include academic instruction as well I believe. It's a shame they don't do the same thing here in the states for low income kids.

>

>

>

> Golf is oddly regionally specific at the junior level I think. Where I live, you'll have some CC kids that make up the area high school teams, but for the most part if you have a pulse and a set of clubs you'll make the team. They certainly aren't turning kids away. It's not competitive at all. A legit good player sticks out like a sore thumb until get to say the state tournament level.

 

Truth. I have a really good 10 year old who plays 12u baseball. And has made the middle school basketball team as a 5th grader. We refuse to do the travel baseball thing. It’s just not our want for weekend life. His either. Each season I get calls from coaches. Offering to waive fees etc. I politely decline. Last season our locally owned youth association imploded ..... loads of the best players went to only playing travel ball. And they( the youth association) struggled to even put together 12 players for a 12u team. We’re not sweating it. Baseball truly is a sport that has sadly jumped the shark. He plays it now because it’s a space filler and some friends play. Soon golf and basketball will be all he plays. But I’ll let him choose when that day is. Travel ball has absolutely killed youth baseball in our area.

Cobra King SZ 10.8* Fuji Atmos Black 6x

TM RBZ tour 14* ADDI 8x 

TM gapr tour 3 iron 21*Evenflow blue 6.5 

Mizuno MP20 4hmb 5-6mmc 7-PW MB Fuji pro tour spec 115x 

Ping Glide 3.0 50 54 60 Fuji pro 115S 

cameron GSS 009 1.5 - sound slot - tungesten sole weights 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @bladehunter said:

> > @OrangeGravy said:

> > J2putts wrote:

> >

> >

> > herdman wrote:

> >

> > Football and basketball are the two sports where it takes less money. In football you can't teach size and speed. Basketball you can play on a local court or gym somewhere. That is why there so many minorities at the highest levels in both. Many from very humble or very poor beginnings. In the USA, baseball now takes money for travel leagues. Same for hockey and some others. Golf still takes some money because at some point you are going to have to pay for green fees and likely lessons.

> >

> >

> >

> > I'd argue against baseball requiring money seeing how many Dominican players make it to the big leagues from meager upbringings.

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> > I think you missed the bolded part of his baseball comment. In the US, baseball has almost completely morphed into the "basketball AAU" format. The typical summer baseball leagues from little league to American Legion are dying on the vine, starting with the older kids and filtering down to little league now. Like golf, High School baseball is mostly meaningless when it comes to college/scholarship exposure. It's all about travel teams and tournaments. It's more efficient for College coaches and pro scouts to go to a tournament and see 20 players of interest against similar talent than to go to a high school game to watch 1 stud play against bad players. These travel teams start at a couple grand and go way up depending on where you live. In some metro areas, the desired teams charge $500+ non-refundable deposit just to try out!

> >

> >

> >

> > There are different rules for international baseball players with respect to MLB. Teams set up baseball academies in these latin american countries and groom players from a very young age. They can also sign players internationally much younger than they can in the US. Here they have to wait until they graduate high school, over seas I think they can sign kids at 15 or 16. Forget which. These academies are similar to the Tennis/Golf ones here in the states except they don't cost anything to the kids and they include academic instruction as well I believe. It's a shame they don't do the same thing here in the states for low income kids.

> >

> >

> >

> > Golf is oddly regionally specific at the junior level I think. Where I live, you'll have some CC kids that make up the area high school teams, but for the most part if you have a pulse and a set of clubs you'll make the team. They certainly aren't turning kids away. It's not competitive at all. A legit good player sticks out like a sore thumb until get to say the state tournament level.

>

> Truth. I have a really good 10 year old who plays 12u baseball. And has made the middle school basketball team as a 5th grader. We refuse to do the travel baseball thing. It’s just not our want for weekend life. His either. Each season I get calls from coaches. Offering to waive fees etc. I politely decline. Last season our locally owned youth association imploded ..... loads of the best players went to only playing travel ball. And they( the youth association) struggled to even put together 12 players for a 12u team. We’re not sweating it. Baseball truly is a sport that has sadly jumped the shark. He plays it now because it’s a space filler and some friends play. Soon golf and basketball will be all he plays. But I’ll let him choose when that day is. Travel ball has absolutely killed youth baseball in our area.

 

What is "12u baseball" ?

Callaway Epic Flash SZ Triple Diamond 9.0 Tour AD TP-6 Stiff

Adams A12 Idea Pro hybrid, 16*, Aldila 85 VS Proto Stiff

Ping G400 hybrid, 19*, 70 gr Stock Stiff

Ping G20, 5-PW, DGS300

Ping Glide Forged, 48, 52, 60, DGS300

Vokey SM8 56/08 (Thanks WRX !!!)

Seemore MT7 Face Balanced (Today)

Chrome Soft Truvis Yellow/Black

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @nsxguy said:

> > @bladehunter said:

> > > @OrangeGravy said:

> > > J2putts wrote:

> > >

> > >

> > > herdman wrote:

> > >

> > > Football and basketball are the two sports where it takes less money. In football you can't teach size and speed. Basketball you can play on a local court or gym somewhere. That is why there so many minorities at the highest levels in both. Many from very humble or very poor beginnings. In the USA, baseball now takes money for travel leagues. Same for hockey and some others. Golf still takes some money because at some point you are going to have to pay for green fees and likely lessons.

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > > I'd argue against baseball requiring money seeing how many Dominican players make it to the big leagues from meager upbringings.

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > > I think you missed the bolded part of his baseball comment. In the US, baseball has almost completely morphed into the "basketball AAU" format. The typical summer baseball leagues from little league to American Legion are dying on the vine, starting with the older kids and filtering down to little league now. Like golf, High School baseball is mostly meaningless when it comes to college/scholarship exposure. It's all about travel teams and tournaments. It's more efficient for College coaches and pro scouts to go to a tournament and see 20 players of interest against similar talent than to go to a high school game to watch 1 stud play against bad players. These travel teams start at a couple grand and go way up depending on where you live. In some metro areas, the desired teams charge $500+ non-refundable deposit just to try out!

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > > There are different rules for international baseball players with respect to MLB. Teams set up baseball academies in these latin american countries and groom players from a very young age. They can also sign players internationally much younger than they can in the US. Here they have to wait until they graduate high school, over seas I think they can sign kids at 15 or 16. Forget which. These academies are similar to the Tennis/Golf ones here in the states except they don't cost anything to the kids and they include academic instruction as well I believe. It's a shame they don't do the same thing here in the states for low income kids.

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > > Golf is oddly regionally specific at the junior level I think. Where I live, you'll have some CC kids that make up the area high school teams, but for the most part if you have a pulse and a set of clubs you'll make the team. They certainly aren't turning kids away. It's not competitive at all. A legit good player sticks out like a sore thumb until get to say the state tournament level.

> >

> > Truth. I have a really good 10 year old who plays 12u baseball. And has made the middle school basketball team as a 5th grader. We refuse to do the travel baseball thing. It’s just not our want for weekend life. His either. Each season I get calls from coaches. Offering to waive fees etc. I politely decline. Last season our locally owned youth association imploded ..... loads of the best players went to only playing travel ball. And they( the youth association) struggled to even put together 12 players for a 12u team. We’re not sweating it. Baseball truly is a sport that has sadly jumped the shark. He plays it now because it’s a space filler and some friends play. Soon golf and basketball will be all he plays. But I’ll let him choose when that day is. Travel ball has absolutely killed youth baseball in our area.

>

> What is "12u baseball" ?

 

It’s the 12 year old division. Kid pitch , mostly regular baseball rules. Except no head first slides. No blocking home plate. But they do leadoffs pickoff moves. Call balks on pitchers etc.

Cobra King SZ 10.8* Fuji Atmos Black 6x

TM RBZ tour 14* ADDI 8x 

TM gapr tour 3 iron 21*Evenflow blue 6.5 

Mizuno MP20 4hmb 5-6mmc 7-PW MB Fuji pro tour spec 115x 

Ping Glide 3.0 50 54 60 Fuji pro 115S 

cameron GSS 009 1.5 - sound slot - tungesten sole weights 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @NevinW said:

> Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

 

Guess it depends on your definition of rich. My parents gave me a comfortable upbringing, but there is no way they could afford a country club membership. Jack's dad apparently was able to afford it at one of the best golf courses in Ohio. If you have the disposable income to pay for country club expenses at a really good golf course, I would consider that rich...at least based on my own upbringing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

> @redfirebird08 said:

> > @NevinW said:

> > Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

>

> Guess it depends on your definition of rich. My parents gave me a comfortable upbringing, but there is no way they could afford a country club membership. Jack's dad apparently was able to afford it at one of the best golf courses in Ohio. If you have the disposable income to pay for country club expenses at a really good golf course, I would consider that rich...at least based on my own upbringing.

 

A depends. Plenty could afford it if living for now. Plenty don’t because they are pack ratting it away in case they live to be 104.

 

Not saying one is right and one is wrong. Just that some can’t buy socks if they don’t have a $500k cushion . Some play the best courses on earth with $2k in a checking account , pay day to pay day.

Cobra King SZ 10.8* Fuji Atmos Black 6x

TM RBZ tour 14* ADDI 8x 

TM gapr tour 3 iron 21*Evenflow blue 6.5 

Mizuno MP20 4hmb 5-6mmc 7-PW MB Fuji pro tour spec 115x 

Ping Glide 3.0 50 54 60 Fuji pro 115S 

cameron GSS 009 1.5 - sound slot - tungesten sole weights 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @bladehunter said:

> > @redfirebird08 said:

> > > @NevinW said:

> > > Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

> >

> > Guess it depends on your definition of rich. My parents gave me a comfortable upbringing, but there is no way they could afford a country club membership. Jack's dad apparently was able to afford it at one of the best golf courses in Ohio. If you have the disposable income to pay for country club expenses at a really good golf course, I would consider that rich...at least based on my own upbringing.

>

> A depends. Plenty could afford it if living for now. Plenty don’t because they are pack ratting it away in case they live to be 104.

>

> Not saying one is right and one is wrong. Just that some can’t buy socks if they don’t have a $500k cushion . Some play the best courses on earth with $2k in a checking account , pay day to pay day.

 

Jack and his family are pretty conservative from what I understand. I would be pretty surprised if his dad put them in a bad financial situation to be members at the country club.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @redfirebird08 said:

> > @bladehunter said:

> > > @redfirebird08 said:

> > > > @NevinW said:

> > > > Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

> > >

> > > Guess it depends on your definition of rich. My parents gave me a comfortable upbringing, but there is no way they could afford a country club membership. Jack's dad apparently was able to afford it at one of the best golf courses in Ohio. If you have the disposable income to pay for country club expenses at a really good golf course, I would consider that rich...at least based on my own upbringing.

> >

> > A depends. Plenty could afford it if living for now. Plenty don’t because they are pack ratting it away in case they live to be 104.

> >

> > Not saying one is right and one is wrong. Just that some can’t buy socks if they don’t have a $500k cushion . Some play the best courses on earth with $2k in a checking account , pay day to pay day.

>

> Jack and his family are pretty conservative from what I understand. I would be pretty surprised if his dad put them in a bad financial situation to be members at the country club.

 

Not saying that he did. Just saying that everyone who’s a member at a nice club isn’t rich.

 

And also putting his kid into a good spot to become goat , might not qualify as a bad financial decision if it was with his last cent. Have to look at the whole picture. Not just think “ protect the nest egg”. The nest egg is worthless if it’s never used.

Cobra King SZ 10.8* Fuji Atmos Black 6x

TM RBZ tour 14* ADDI 8x 

TM gapr tour 3 iron 21*Evenflow blue 6.5 

Mizuno MP20 4hmb 5-6mmc 7-PW MB Fuji pro tour spec 115x 

Ping Glide 3.0 50 54 60 Fuji pro 115S 

cameron GSS 009 1.5 - sound slot - tungesten sole weights 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @bladehunter said:

> > @redfirebird08 said:

> > > @bladehunter said:

> > > > @redfirebird08 said:

> > > > > @NevinW said:

> > > > > Jack's dad was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist so I have good idea how much they make. It is a comfortable living but they are hardly rich.

> > > >

> > > > Guess it depends on your definition of rich. My parents gave me a comfortable upbringing, but there is no way they could afford a country club membership. Jack's dad apparently was able to afford it at one of the best golf courses in Ohio. If you have the disposable income to pay for country club expenses at a really good golf course, I would consider that rich...at least based on my own upbringing.

> > >

> > > A depends. Plenty could afford it if living for now. Plenty don’t because they are pack ratting it away in case they live to be 104.

> > >

> > > Not saying one is right and one is wrong. Just that some can’t buy socks if they don’t have a $500k cushion . Some play the best courses on earth with $2k in a checking account , pay day to pay day.

> >

> > Jack and his family are pretty conservative from what I understand. I would be pretty surprised if his dad put them in a bad financial situation to be members at the country club.

>

> Not saying that he did. Just saying that everyone who’s a member at a nice club isn’t rich.

>

> And also putting his kid into a good spot to become goat , might not qualify as a bad financial decision if it was with his last cent. Have to look at the whole picture. Not just think “ protect the nest egg”. The nest egg is worthless if it’s never used.

 

Ha, yes I can see that angle if your kid shows a lot of talent at young age. I think Tiger's parents and Rory's parents both did something similar. Paid off in a big way for them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...