Jump to content

We have a new teacher at our club.


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 61
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Took the first lesson yesterday. Seeing your Trackman numbers and your high speed video is pretty darned cool. The guy spend an hour and 15 minutes with me and I hit a lot of balls. Overall a good exp

> @MountainGoat said: > > @Moonlightgrm said: > > I am 61-years old. I began playing golf at the age of 10. I didn’t touch a club during my college years because I played intercolleg

Just because you are an old golfer that can't learn new tricks, doesn't mean that applies to everyone. The fact that he's a low single digit at 61 means he's a decent golfer, he didn't get that way by

> @MountainGoat said:

> > @wagolfer7 said:

> > > @MountainGoat said:

> > > > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > > > I am 61-years old. I began playing golf at the age of 10. I didn’t touch a club during my college years because I played intercollegiate baseball. I am not nearly as flexible as I was 20-years ago. Oh yeah, and my favorite color is red.

> > >

> > > If you were 16, I'd say go for it. But, at 61, this is a dangerous path. This guy's going to ruin your game. You've got no more a shot at rebuilding a 50-year-old swing than you do of becoming a concert pianist. I know a lot of really good senior golfers, and not a one of them has classic mechanics. The road to scratch for someone your age is not paved with videos and launch monitor data. It's learning how to manage the game you've got and becoming a wizard inside 100 yards.

> > >

> >

> > Wow man, take it easy. Don't throw your own insecurities out at this guy. I literally play with a guy at age 58 that just went pro. Made it through to two qualifiers now. He is absolutely and in no way is too old to improve or change his swing.

> >

> > @Moonlightgrm - good for you to approach this with an open mind. And good luck on your journey to getting better. Ignore the dumb noise around here.

> He asked; I answered. Go ahead and pour honey in the OP’s ear; that sort of thing is real popular around here. Rah, rah, rah! Sure, it’s possible for a 61-year-old to improve his game. I’m not saying otherwise. But, not with video cameras and launch monitors. Trying to improve by standing your swing up against a mechanical performance standard is the wrong methodology. Older golfers learn differently.

 

You are misinformed. OP is seeing a teacher that used trackman to help diagnose and visually show the OP his swing faults and how to fix them. He's not banging balls by himself looking at a trackman.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @wagolfer7 said:

> > @MountainGoat said:

> > > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > > I am 61-years old. I began playing golf at the age of 10. I didn’t touch a club during my college years because I played intercollegiate baseball. I am not nearly as flexible as I was 20-years ago. Oh yeah, and my favorite color is red.

> >

> > If you were 16, I'd say go for it. But, at 61, this is a dangerous path. This guy's going to ruin your game. You've got no more a shot at rebuilding a 50-year-old swing than you do of becoming a concert pianist. I know a lot of really good senior golfers, and not a one of them has classic mechanics. The road to scratch for someone your age is not paved with videos and launch monitor data. It's learning how to manage the game you've got and becoming a wizard inside 100 yards.

> >

>

> Wow man, take it easy. Don't throw your own insecurities out at this guy. I literally play with a guy at age 58 that just went pro. Made it through to two qualifiers now. He is absolutely and in no way is too old to improve or change his swing.

>

> @Moonlightgrm - good for you to approach this with an open mind. And good luck on your journey to getting better. Ignore the dumb noise around here.

 

Take it easy is right ( wink ). There are lots of young professionals siding with a claim that can take a 2.8 index to scratch without knowing him nor seeing his game.

We're wasting our time here.

If this turned out to be a positive experience for the OP, great ! Or at minimum, a good advertisement for the "new guy".

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @wkuo3 said:

> > @wagolfer7 said:

> > > @MountainGoat said:

> > > > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > > > I am 61-years old. I began playing golf at the age of 10. I didn’t touch a club during my college years because I played intercollegiate baseball. I am not nearly as flexible as I was 20-years ago. Oh yeah, and my favorite color is red.

> > >

> > > If you were 16, I'd say go for it. But, at 61, this is a dangerous path. This guy's going to ruin your game. You've got no more a shot at rebuilding a 50-year-old swing than you do of becoming a concert pianist. I know a lot of really good senior golfers, and not a one of them has classic mechanics. The road to scratch for someone your age is not paved with videos and launch monitor data. It's learning how to manage the game you've got and becoming a wizard inside 100 yards.

> > >

> >

> > Wow man, take it easy. Don't throw your own insecurities out at this guy. I literally play with a guy at age 58 that just went pro. Made it through to two qualifiers now. He is absolutely and in no way is too old to improve or change his swing.

> >

> > @Moonlightgrm - good for you to approach this with an open mind. And good luck on your journey to getting better. Ignore the dumb noise around here.

>

> Take it easy is right ( wink ). There are lots of young professionals siding with a claim that can take a 2.8 index to scratch without knowing him nor seeing his game.

> We're wasting our time here.

> If this turned out to be a positive experience for the OP, great ! Or at minimum, a good advertisement for the "new guy".

>

 

That's different. He already saw him, had a positive experience and is going to work on his swing flaws. To tell him "you can't change your swing at age 61" is absolute BS and no need to say something like that to the OP. We don't know the OP and have no idea of what he can and can't do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny to hear someone say WRX is filled with Rah Rah posts. We must read different threads. ?

@Moonlightgrm Thanks for the recap of the lesson. Good luck in your journey to scratch.

Oh....darn was that to rah rah ?

:smilie_titty: TSi2 10.5 GD IZ5 
:smilie_ping: G410 5 & 7 FW Alta CB 65g
:smilie_ping: G410 4 hybrid Alta CB
:smilie_titty:T100S/T200 Jet Black Combo AMT Black R300 
Vokey SM 7 54/58

Vokey SM8 46*
TM Custom My Spider 35" 

 

ProV1X No. 12
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I’ll exit this discussion, and you guys can call me names on your own time. You can disagree with me. That’s fine. But, impugning my character and motives are inappropriate debate strategies. My actual character is one of an objective analyst who has more experience with this topic than you can possibly imagine. My motives are to prevent a fellow senior from going down the wrong path.

 

My position is that a 61-year-old golfer with 50+ years of experience and who carries a 2.8 index is an expert who has somehow made his shortcomings work for him. This isn’t a guy in the Tuesday night league trying to break 80. My experience is that this sort of golfer makes a fundamental mistake chasing mechanical improvements given to him by a teacher who relies on video and launch monitor data. While improvements to his game can be made, there are better techniques than the ones used with a much younger player. This conclusion is based on both experience and learning theory.

 

My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

 

We all take on instruction with the hope of improvement, and I am not surprised the OP’s early interactions with the instructor were positive. My alternate hope is that he reports back to us in 6 months with his actual progress. Scores would be nice.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @wagolfer7 said:

> > @wkuo3 said:

> > > @wagolfer7 said:

> > > > @MountainGoat said:

> > > > > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > > > > I am 61-years old. I began playing golf at the age of 10. I didn’t touch a club during my college years because I played intercollegiate baseball. I am not nearly as flexible as I was 20-years ago. Oh yeah, and my favorite color is red.

> > > >

> > > > If you were 16, I'd say go for it. But, at 61, this is a dangerous path. This guy's going to ruin your game. You've got no more a shot at rebuilding a 50-year-old swing than you do of becoming a concert pianist. I know a lot of really good senior golfers, and not a one of them has classic mechanics. The road to scratch for someone your age is not paved with videos and launch monitor data. It's learning how to manage the game you've got and becoming a wizard inside 100 yards.

> > > >

> > >

> > > Wow man, take it easy. Don't throw your own insecurities out at this guy. I literally play with a guy at age 58 that just went pro. Made it through to two qualifiers now. He is absolutely and in no way is too old to improve or change his swing.

> > >

> > > @Moonlightgrm - good for you to approach this with an open mind. And good luck on your journey to getting better. Ignore the dumb noise around here.

> >

> > Take it easy is right ( wink ). There are lots of young professionals siding with a claim that can take a 2.8 index to scratch without knowing him nor seeing his game.

> > We're wasting our time here.

> > If this turned out to be a positive experience for the OP, great ! Or at minimum, a good advertisement for the "new guy".

> >

>

> That's different. He already saw him, had a positive experience and is going to work on his swing flaws. To tell him "you can't change your swing at age 61" is absolute BS and no need to say something like that to the OP. We don't know the OP and have no idea of what he can and can't do.

 

Like I stated, Great that it worked out for the lesson. Getting to scratch or better is to be seen.

Think about it, A promise to take a 2.8 to scratch without even knowing the golfer is the same as the promise of " 15 more yards".

I know how marketing works, but I also throw away the "junk mail" and ignore the "spam" on electronic device.

I'm happy the OP feels he's getting his lesson's worth at this point. Not that I'm against this particular "new guy", he might be the best thing happens to this club, who knows ? For all those caution jumping into this , barely suggested the OP should investigate more before the plunge.

You are entitled to your opinion and so do we. This is a public forum last I had seen it. For all of those would only allow their voice to be heard should take a look in the mirror. Maybe that's why we are having the issues we are having these days.

When asking for "help" in a public forum, is expecting all kinds of opinion. Take what you believe is the best for your situation and live with it. There is not responsibility nor liability. Most of the members here are only trying to help as asked, jumping up and push down other members is a childish behavior.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Any golfer (no matter age, physical makeup) can use an instructor and make tweaks to get better. I've been teaching for about 6 years now, and there is a lot of things I see people do that real simple to fix, yet they have no clue that they are doing something wrong; posture/setup, inconsistent pace of swing, and the things they feel in their swing are effects not the actual problems.

  • Like 1

Driver: Taylormade M2 ('17) 10.5* ; Accura MV85x PINK 1 of 1

3 wood: Taylormade Aeroburner TP 15*; Diamana Blueboard 72X

Hybrid: PXG Gen1 19* (set 18*) Hzardus Handcrafted Black 100x (Not getting alot of use)

Irons: PXG Gen1 0311 4-7 iron; Aldila RIP Phenom Hybrid 100 Tour X (Lofts; 17.5*, 21*, 25*, 29*)

          NIKE Vapor Pro Combo 6, 8, 9, PW; Aldila VS Proto 100x (Lofts; 33*, 38*, 43*, 48*)

Wedges: Scratch 53* (bent 51*); TT DG S300 , Callaway MD4 Raw 54*, 58*; TT DG S300

               Custom Wedge 63* (made buddy made it); KBS Tour Stiff

Putter: Scotty Cameron Studio Design MB #5; 35 inches; Super Stroke GP Tour

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is food for thought: My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Moonlightgrm said:

> This is food for thought: My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

 

I read that, and it might apply to some players, but not all. I'm 63 now. Two years ago I made some changes to my set-up and swing with guidance from a good instructor. We used video to illustrate what the changes were for, and to allow me to monitor my process in actually making the changes. I have made significant progress, definitely changed my set-up, and largely improved the swing motion. The changes in ball flight and curvature are evident. I still practice using some specific feels and drills. I have had no injuries at all, although I certainly get a little muscle soreness at times. I didn't improve my scoring by tons, maybe one to two strokes on average, but that's fairly significant when I spend most of my time before the lessons playing to a 6 or 7, and now I'm between 4 and 6 most of the season. I made these changes by practicing once or twice a week, usually less than about 45 minutes each time.

The moral of that story is that even an older golfer who is already playing to a decent level can improve, with good instruction and a reasonable amount of practice. For @moonlightsilicon , if you enjoyed the lesson with the new teacher, and you're willing to put in the effort, go for it, and good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @davep043 said:

> > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > This is food for thought: My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

>

> I read that, and it might apply to some players, but not all. I'm 63 now. Two years ago I made some changes to my set-up and swing with guidance from a good instructor. We used video to illustrate what the changes were for, and to allow me to monitor my process in actually making the changes. I have made significant progress, definitely changed my set-up, and largely improved the swing motion. The changes in ball flight and curvature are evident. I still practice using some specific feels and drills. I have had no injuries at all, although I certainly get a little muscle soreness at times. I didn't improve my scoring by tons, maybe one to two strokes on average, but that's fairly significant when I spend most of my time before the lessons playing to a 6 or 7, and now I'm between 4 and 6 most of the season. I made these changes by practicing once or twice a week, usually less than about 45 minutes each time.

> The moral of that story is that even an older golfer who is already playing to a decent level can improve, with good instruction and a reasonable amount of practice. For @moonlightsilicon , if you enjoyed the lesson with the new teacher, and you're willing to put in the effort, go for it, and good luck!

 

Thanks Dave, I needed to hear that!

 

Congrats! A couple of strokes at your level is great progress.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Moonlightgrm said:

> Thanks Dave, I needed to hear that!

>

One more little thing, I read a few posts from a guy who said

> @MountainGoat said:

>Sure, it’s possible for a 61-year-old to improve his game. I’m not saying otherwise. **But, not with video cameras and launch monitors.**

We all learn differently, some people have no interest in seeing video, they just want to be told what to do. Others (like me) enjoy understanding the reasons for the change. Video can also be a good check in between lessons, so I can verify that I'm doing the drills correctly, that the change is actually taking effect. I don't try to diagnose issues on my own, but I've been taught what to look for in a specific change. Even old guys can learn to use modern technology.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @MountainGoat said:

> OK, I’ll exit this discussion, and you guys can call me names on your own time. You can disagree with me. That’s fine. But, impugning my character and motives are inappropriate debate strategies. My actual character is one of an objective analyst who has more experience with this topic than you can possibly imagine. My motives are to prevent a fellow senior from going down the wrong path.

>

> My position is that a 61-year-old golfer with 50+ years of experience and who carries a 2.8 index is an expert who has somehow made his shortcomings work for him. This isn’t a guy in the Tuesday night league trying to break 80. My experience is that this sort of golfer makes a fundamental mistake chasing mechanical improvements given to him by a teacher who relies on video and launch monitor data. While improvements to his game can be made, there are better techniques than the ones used with a much younger player. This conclusion is based on both experience and learning theory.

>

> My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

>

> We all take on instruction with the hope of improvement, and I am not surprised the OP’s early interactions with the instructor were positive. My alternate hope is that he reports back to us in 6 months with his actual progress. Scores would be nice.

>

 

My apologies. I found the wording of your post to be out of line. It didn't sound like an opinion, but a straight up "you can't do this". In all fairness a silly debate. Obviously injuring yourself is not a good thing and was a good thing for you to point out to the OP to try to avoid and be cautious of. Again my apologies. I did not mean to attack your character by any means.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Moonlightgrm said:

> This is food for thought: My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

 

Oddly enough, some folks THINK they have range of motion issues, but in reality it's poor mechanics that limit them, which can than translate to injury. For the longest time I thought I had ROM issues, couldn't get remotely close to what I thought was ideal, figured it was from being inflexible/fat/oddly proportioned. In reality it was simply moving in the wrong way

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Krt22 said:

> > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > This is food for thought: My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

>

> Oddly enough, some folks THINK they have range of motion issues, but in reality it's poor mechanics that limit them, which can than translate to injury. For the longest time I thought I had ROM issues, couldn't get remotely close to what I thought was ideal, figured it was from being inflexible/fat/oddly proportioned. In reality it was simply moving in the wrong way

 

This. My avatar (probably too small to see) is my before and after backswing in 3D taken a few hours apart. Only difference is Dan c teaching me how to move in between.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @jut111 said:

> > @Krt22 said:

> > > @Moonlightgrm said:

> > > This is food for thought: My warning is that golfers who go this route 1) eventually drop the proposed changes and 2) often get injured. Failing to make the desired change is one thing, injury is quite another…particularly in this age group. We tend to see tendonitis, twisted knees, and bad backs in this group. The former results from extended range sessions trying to grind 10,000 repetitions into ‘muscle memory’. The latter two come from trying to force an aging body thru a blocked range of motion.

> >

> > Oddly enough, some folks THINK they have range of motion issues, but in reality it's poor mechanics that limit them, which can than translate to injury. For the longest time I thought I had ROM issues, couldn't get remotely close to what I thought was ideal, figured it was from being inflexible/fat/oddly proportioned. In reality it was simply moving in the wrong way

>

> This. My avatar (probably too small to see) is my before and after backswing in 3D taken a few hours apart. Only difference is Dan c teaching me how to move in between.

>

 

Experienced something very similar. Changing how I pivoted had a huge impact on where my arms/hands ended up at the top

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Moonlightgrm said:

> Jut111, that’s a huge gain in the amount of your rotation. When time permits, would you elaborate on what your changes in motion entailed?

 

Sure. I had to learn how to extend from the hips and thoracic region and left tilt vs stay in flexion and try and just rotate. Ironically my initial feel that greatly increased my rotation felt like I was not rotating at all. But just extending and tilting. Found a picture from that same session a few years back. 4jh3tkbxboui.png

 

Even better. This was my screen saver for a few years. (God I’m a golf nerd). pjerell6m60m.png

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

The light bulb went on a few days ago. I have learned to quiet my right hand through the impact zone with the swing thought, paint the ground with my right hand. It has greatly reduced my rapid club face rotation through the hitting zone. My accuracy has improved, greatly. My shot dispersion is silly good. Next on the agenda is to increase my flexibility. If I want to increase the angle of my shoulders through impact, I will need more flexibility. My teacher says if I can increase my shoulder angle, it will enable me to keep the club face down the line longer. More flexibility will also help me to gain back the club head speed that I’ve lost with age. At 42-years old, my driver swing speed was 112 mph. At 61-years old, my driver swing speed has dropped to 98 mph. I have the winter months to work on my body!

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @RichieHunt said:

> I don't think too much information is really a problem for golfers. It's about how the compartmentalize the information when they practice along with often times not understanding the information because the teacher is telling them something new in a short, fixed period of time.

>

> I look at it much like a putting together a jigsaw puzzle. You know what the puzzle is supposed to look like. With the swing, I work on the instruction chronologically much like I would with the outer pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. I'll start with address before I work on the takeaway. I'll work on the takeaway before I start working on something midway thru the backswing, etc. If I can't figure out an outer edge of a jigsaw puzzle...I'll move on to other pieces that I know fit and I know where they go. If I can't get something down in the backswing despite putting forth my best efforts, I may move to something in the downswing that I know I can get.

>

> George Gankas provides a ton of information in his lessons. What he does is he has you take your phone and record him when he's talking about certain things so you don't forget. You're not going to be able to work on everything at once, so it's best to have it on camera so you will always have it from the horse's mouth. One of the strengths of GG's coaching is his ability to explain stuff so the golfer understands it conceptually. They may not understand how to physically do it since their body has moved a different way for such a long time. But, he's still providing a ton of information and has it setup so where the golfer can use that information to their benefit instead of it being a detriment.

>

> $90/hour lesson is pretty reasonable these days for somebody that has that much technology. Whether he knows what he's actually talking about is a different discussion.

>

>

>

>

> RH

 

Man, loved it up to Gankas. Then you lost me. I've really never understood any of his lessons conceptually or otherwise. You really credit him with some gains you have made? Just curious.

Sometimes I'm not even sure Gankas is speaking English.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @BB28403 said:

> > @RichieHunt said:

> > I don't think too much information is really a problem for golfers. It's about how the compartmentalize the information when they practice along with often times not understanding the information because the teacher is telling them something new in a short, fixed period of time.

> >

> > I look at it much like a putting together a jigsaw puzzle. You know what the puzzle is supposed to look like. With the swing, I work on the instruction chronologically much like I would with the outer pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. I'll start with address before I work on the takeaway. I'll work on the takeaway before I start working on something midway thru the backswing, etc. If I can't figure out an outer edge of a jigsaw puzzle...I'll move on to other pieces that I know fit and I know where they go. If I can't get something down in the backswing despite putting forth my best efforts, I may move to something in the downswing that I know I can get.

> >

> > George Gankas provides a ton of information in his lessons. What he does is he has you take your phone and record him when he's talking about certain things so you don't forget. You're not going to be able to work on everything at once, so it's best to have it on camera so you will always have it from the horse's mouth. One of the strengths of GG's coaching is his ability to explain stuff so the golfer understands it conceptually. They may not understand how to physically do it since their body has moved a different way for such a long time. But, he's still providing a ton of information and has it setup so where the golfer can use that information to their benefit instead of it being a detriment.

> >

> > $90/hour lesson is pretty reasonable these days for somebody that has that much technology. Whether he knows what he's actually talking about is a different discussion.

> >

> >

> >

> >

> > RH

>

> Man, loved it up to Gankas. Then you lost me. I've really never understood any of his lessons conceptually or otherwise. You really credit him with some gains you have made? Just curious.

> Sometimes I'm not even sure Gankas is speaking English.

 

I don't think GG is difficult to understand. He does have a tendency to speak a little too fast, but it's usually in a situation where the student getting the lesson has familiarized himself with what GG teaches. And even so, GG is good about detecting when a student doesn't really grasp a concept.

 

The point being is that as far as giving giving lessons at a high price, GG may be doing that more than anybody and he has had a high success rate with his students. He's a good example of an instructor that gives away a lot of information and if you can compartmentalize it properly, you can use that to your advantage and not only improve your game, but not have to get lessons every week or every month.

 

The same applies for the local instructor that gives out a lot of information. If it doesn't work, it's not the information that's the problem. There's more to teaching than information, but good instructors separate themselves by getting their students to make best use of the information.

 

 

 

 

 

RH

Link to post
Share on other sites

The difference is in the instructor. Most golf instructors are no different than most people in any job -- they are completely incompetent. They have no idea what they're talking about and just pull stuff out of their butts. Just think of how many yahoos you run into every day of your life.

 

A competent instructor can help anyone at any age.

 

Caveat emptor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @RichieHunt said:

> > @BB28403 said:

> > > @RichieHunt said:

> > > I don't think too much information is really a problem for golfers. It's about how the compartmentalize the information when they practice along with often times not understanding the information because the teacher is telling them something new in a short, fixed period of time.

> > >

> > > I look at it much like a putting together a jigsaw puzzle. You know what the puzzle is supposed to look like. With the swing, I work on the instruction chronologically much like I would with the outer pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. I'll start with address before I work on the takeaway. I'll work on the takeaway before I start working on something midway thru the backswing, etc. If I can't figure out an outer edge of a jigsaw puzzle...I'll move on to other pieces that I know fit and I know where they go. If I can't get something down in the backswing despite putting forth my best efforts, I may move to something in the downswing that I know I can get.

> > >

> > > George Gankas provides a ton of information in his lessons. What he does is he has you take your phone and record him when he's talking about certain things so you don't forget. You're not going to be able to work on everything at once, so it's best to have it on camera so you will always have it from the horse's mouth. One of the strengths of GG's coaching is his ability to explain stuff so the golfer understands it conceptually. They may not understand how to physically do it since their body has moved a different way for such a long time. But, he's still providing a ton of information and has it setup so where the golfer can use that information to their benefit instead of it being a detriment.

> > >

> > > $90/hour lesson is pretty reasonable these days for somebody that has that much technology. Whether he knows what he's actually talking about is a different discussion.

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > > RH

> >

> > Man, loved it up to Gankas. Then you lost me. I've really never understood any of his lessons conceptually or otherwise. You really credit him with some gains you have made? Just curious.

> > Sometimes I'm not even sure Gankas is speaking English.

>

> I don't think GG is difficult to understand. He does have a tendency to speak a little too fast, but it's usually in a situation where the student getting the lesson has familiarized himself with what GG teaches. And even so, GG is good about detecting when a student doesn't really grasp a concept.

>

> The point being is that as far as giving giving lessons at a high price, GG may be doing that more than anybody and he has had a high success rate with his students. He's a good example of an instructor that gives away a lot of information and if you can compartmentalize it properly, you can use that to your advantage and not only improve your game, but not have to get lessons every week or every month.

>

> The same applies for the local instructor that gives out a lot of information. If it doesn't work, it's not the information that's the problem. There's more to teaching than information, but good instructors separate themselves by getting their students to make best use of the information.

>

>

>

>

>

> RH

 

Thanks for the info and 1 more follow up question . Have you taken lessons with GG?

 

And yeah I was excited about GG at first and then I either see him as a snake oil salesman or just over my head. Prob the latter!

I remember one episode where Me and My golf visit GG. And they just look perplexed as to what the heck he is talking about. It was funny because they are wound so tight .

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Soloman1 said:

> The difference is in the instructor. Most golf instructors are no different than most people in any job -- they are completely incompetent. They have no idea what they're talking about and just pull stuff out of their butts. Just think of how many yahoos you run into every day of your life.

>

> A competent instructor can help anyone at any age.

>

> Caveat emptor.

 

 

Yeah, perhaps the PGA program is a good litmus test?

Ask around to friends of similar skill level and see what they think. Or take the plunge and see if the instructor helps.

Usually a good feel can be had by googling the instructor and asking around.

But then again, someone with an abrasive personality could talk bad about a good instructor they did not get along with.

Anyhow, your mileage may vary .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just turned 60 last summer. Sustained my lowest handicap ever and lowest dispersion of my handicap ever over a season - started at 6.4, got up to 7.6 and settled at 7.0. I've inched my way better through instruction, made some big leaps mentally late last summer (just before having to hang up the clubs because of my elbow) and earlier this year in terms of "getting" some new things that really work for me (my instructor evolves as well - the best kind). Better now than I was 10 years ago, and way better than I was 3 or 4 years ago, and my range sessions are not nearly as frequent and when they happen are much more focused. The last 18 months I have been fighting tennis elbow in my left elbow that will likely need surgery this winter - and the tennis elbow had nothing to do with golf or beating balls. As for tempting a bad back, I've been lucky not to have back issues, but the swing I work on now is WAY better for my back in the long run than what I was doing for decades and should allow me to have a longer and more enjoyable life in golf - discovered through . . . . quality instruction.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> @Moonlightgrm said:

> I am 61-years old. I began playing golf at the age of 10. I didn’t touch a club during my college years because I played intercollegiate baseball. I am not nearly as flexible as I was 20-years ago. Oh yeah, and my favorite color is red.

 

I got a feeling, at 2.8, you will know if what he is talking about is shite.You have been doing something right.

 

But "red"?? lol I'm 66. Black is my color.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Our picks

    • **GIVEAWAY** Cobra RadSpeed Big Tour Fairway ENTER NOW!
      Cobra RadSpeed Big Tour 14.5* fairway giveaway!!!.To enter reply in this thread that you're IN!
       
      That's it. You'll be entered into the giveaway (one entry per person). Winner chosen at random in two weeks. Be sure to check out the attached pics. Good luck!
       
      If you are not a member her please register here to allow you to reply to this post and enter. Registration is free... https://forums.golfwrx.com/register/
      ======================================================================================================
      We randomize all the number of posts and the #1 number on the top is the winner. Say there is 1,000 replies from members. We will randomize 1 to 1,000 using a website that has a randomizer. It scrambles the numbers and the #1 is the first place and the #2 is the second etc. If the winner has duplicate entries we count the first
       





       
        • Like
      • 946 replies
    • 2021 Valero Texas Open - discussion & links
      Please put any questions or comments here. 
       
      This week, the PGA Tour is at TPC San Antonio on the Oaks Course for the Valero Texas Open. GolfWRX was on-site Tuesday to catch a glimpse into the bags of some of the world’s top golfers.
       
      The field of 144 is getting ready to battle starting Thursday for the $7.7 million purse, with $1.386 million going to the winner. The tournament is also the last event where players can qualify for The Masters, just like Canadian Corey Conners did last year.
       
      Check out our "Most interesting photos" Part 1, and Part 2.
       

       
      2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #1 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #2 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #3 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #4 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #5 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #6 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #7 2021 Valero Texas Open - Tuesday #8  


       
      Cameron putters (added Bernd Wiesberger's custom T-11) -2021 Valero Texas Open Piretti putters -2021 Valero Texas Open Branden Grace testing AutoFlex shaft @ 2021 Valero Texas Open  
      Check out our "Most interesting photos" Part 1, and Part 2.
       

       
        • Like
      • 29 replies
    • **GIVEAWAY** Odyssey Ten Triple Track Putter! ENTER NOW!
      NEW Odyssey Ten Triple Track putter giveaway!!!.To enter reply in this thread that you're IN!
       
      That's it. You'll be entered into the giveaway (one entry per person). Winner chosen at random in two weeks. Be sure to check out the attached pics. Good luck!
       
      If you are not a member her please register here to allow you to reply to this post and enter. Registration is free... https://forums.golfwrx.com/register/
      ======================================================================================================
      We randomize all the number of posts and the #1 number on the top is the winner. Say there is 1,000 replies from members. We will randomize 1 to 1,000 using a website that has a randomizer. It scrambles the numbers and the #1 is the first place and the #2 is the second etc. If the winner has duplicate entries we count the first
       





       
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 1,574 replies
    • 2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - discussion and links
      Please put any questions or comments here
       
       

       
      2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - Monday #1
      2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - Monday #2
      2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - Monday #3
      2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - Monday #4
      2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - Monday #5
      2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play - Monday #6
       
       

       
      Hideki testing putters at WGC Dell Technologies Match Play
      Odyssey/Toulon Atlanta putter - 2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play
      Cameron putters - 2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play
      Patrick Reed testing TPT shafts 2021 WGC Dell Technologies Match Play
       
       
      • 54 replies
    • 2021 Players - discussion and links
      Please post any questions or comments here
       
       

       
      2021 Players - Monday #1
      2021 Players - Monday #2
      2021 Players - Monday #3
      2021 Players - Monday #4
      2021 Players - Tuesday #1
      2021 Players - Tuesday #2
      2021 Players - Tuesday #3
      2021 Players - Tuesday #4
      2021 Players - Tuesday #5
      2021 Players - Tuesday #6
       
       

       
      Maverick McNealy's custom 1 of 1 Callaway Apex MB irons - 2021 Players
      Adam Long's Cameron T-5 proto - 2021 Players
      Abraham Ancer's custom Muira irons and custom MMT shafts - 2021 Players
      Bettinardi putters & cover - 2021 Players
      Jon Rahm's bag - 2021 Players
      Xander Schauffele's bag - 2021 Players
      Sergio with a Cameron putter - 2021 Players
      Cameron T11 & 11.5 putters - 2021 Players
      Sergio Garcia's clubs - 2021 Players
      Scott Brown's Odyssey gamer - 2021 Players
       
       
       
      • 52 replies

×
×
  • Create New...