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Winter tinkering - How's your kid"s Driver Swing Speed?


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I pulled that chart from here: http://www.golfwrx.com/567940/swing-speed-how-do-you-compare/

Chris Finn is a great guy and knows his stuff. My son worked with him for about 6 months. Had the pleasure of having several discussions with Chris.Number 1 predictor in distance for juniors is weig

10-13 is an extremely wide age range at a very crucial time for growth. A young 10 vs old 13 can be almost 4 years apart, and up to 1.5ft and 50lbs different. I’d say a 10 year old swinging 70-75mph

Had a great driver fitting / track man session. Our fitter at Modern Golf was fantastic, he knew the Track Man numbers well and sure enough focussed on increasing angle of attack to maximize number and increased loft and moved to draw setting to max numbers. No need for new driver but we upgraded anyway and grabbed a demo F9 with Ladies Shaft. She is hitting it great, much more consistent with this setting and an inch longer and I can sleep well at night knowing it's been fitted. No more tinkering for a couple of weeks anyway!

Ping I15 8* Fubuki Tour
X-Hot (2006) Vista Pro 80
X-Hot Pro Hybrids 18, 23
Wilson D100 25* Hybrid
X-Tour S300
Vokey 50, 54, 58

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  • 3 weeks later...

Given, my daughter is only 8.5 54"/78 lbs, but her swing tops-out at 62 and sits in the 58/59 range consistently. I have no idea how that compares with other eight-year-old girls, as she has yet to play in a tournament. Her and my six-year-old son picked up the game in July, and they want to start playing tournaments next month.

My son (52"/68 lbs) turns seven in May, and he's topping out at 59 mph, sitting at 55 mph.

We're in the last weeks of the SuperSpeed Level 1 training.

As a native Michigander, I don't envy your winter in Canada--but I'm glad you seem to have an indoor simulator you can hit on.

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My kids have not been on a launch monitor but my 11 yo daughter averaged 175 yds (as a 10 yo) at Drive Chip and Putt qualifying last year. Unfortunately, she pulled all of her drives OB in the subregionals as the first kid out after a 3 hour lightning delay. My then 7 year old son averaged 150 yards, finishing 2nd out of 22 kids. He had just started playing and didn’t do as well in chipping and putting. She’s petite and skinny and he’s short and stocky, but they both have really nice swings and are apparently pretty long for their ages. Since that time, he will occasionally outdrive her (they play together on our club’s Junior League team).

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My daughter 9.5, I'd same from experience of other girls and comparing that to of USKG worlds kids I've seen at 8 those are pretty good numbers. I want to say my kid swing speed was around 65 a year ago on average give or take. She was using 54" set back then as well . You have some 8 year old who can't break 60 and then you have those that break 70. But most will will in the low 60s from the distances that I've seen which I would say 120-135 probably an average driving distance of an 8 year old.

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I can't (or don't want to) believe that this chart is accurate. According to this chart, 75% of men 30-39 swing their driver faster than 102.2 mph. Experience tells me this is not even close to being true.

Driver: TaylorMade SIM 8* (standard setting) with MCA Tensei AV Raw Orange 75TX at 44.5"
3W: TaylorMade M5 15* (standard setting) with Oban Devotion 8 O5 at 42"
Hybrid: PXG Gen 2 0317X 19* (standard setting) with Oban Kiyoshi Purple Hybrid O5 at 39.5"
4i-9i: Callaway '18 Apex MB's with KBS C-Taper 130X at 1/4" long
46: Callaway JAWS MD5 10S
50: Callaway JAWS MD5 10S
54: Callaway JAWS MD5 8C
58: Callaway JAWS MD5 8W
Putter: Kari Lajosi Custom DD201WB

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That's great feedback, and thank you for it. This is one of the few outlets I've found to get a feel of what to expect from a competitive junior golf environment without actually experiencing it... even living in FL. Reading Daddy Caddy on the Bag was a nice recommendation I got from an old thread here.

Something else great about this forum was the feedback on outfitting juniors with clubs. It steered us toward Flynn irons and wedges, (a like-new Velocity set for her, a clearance Advantage 6i and GW/Velocity LW for him) although I admit to balking at their price for hybrids and drivers. Went with USKG Ultralight (Gen 2, I think) there. My daughter has a Prodi G driver I splurged on used via eBay she might be able to swing now, but I would like to see her grow another inch before using it. She's getting her drive out up to 125-140 with the USKG 54" when she squares it up, although consistency is a work in progress as expected right now. The more reps, the better it gets.

 

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The chart is accurate enough when it come to maximum speed there are a lot variables that effect speed and things like how heavy a driver is or even flex can effect total speed.

the problem with most men between 30-39 out there just brought off the rack clubs that was not fitted correctly. I know after learning about proper fitting I picked up a lot speed personally. Most people can swing faster then give themselves credit for.

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I hear your point about proper fitting possibly increasing club head speed. However, I still believe there is now way the chart in this thread can be accurate as to the average golfer. Per the chart, the average 17 to 29 year old swings driver at about 113mph, which is the same average speed of a PGA Tour Pro. I can't believe that the average 17 to 29 year old has the same club head speed as the average PGA Tour Pro.

Driver: TaylorMade SIM 8* (standard setting) with MCA Tensei AV Raw Orange 75TX at 44.5"
3W: TaylorMade M5 15* (standard setting) with Oban Devotion 8 O5 at 42"
Hybrid: PXG Gen 2 0317X 19* (standard setting) with Oban Kiyoshi Purple Hybrid O5 at 39.5"
4i-9i: Callaway '18 Apex MB's with KBS C-Taper 130X at 1/4" long
46: Callaway JAWS MD5 10S
50: Callaway JAWS MD5 10S
54: Callaway JAWS MD5 8C
58: Callaway JAWS MD5 8W
Putter: Kari Lajosi Custom DD201WB

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Listen to what Dr Greg Rose from TPI has to say on the subject. I'm paraphrasing here but it's to the effect of, teach them to swing fast as kids and work on hitting it straight later. This is all backed up by multiple long term athletic development programs.

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There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.
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On the "swing fast" part, I am always curious if they imply "swing fast with good (or correct as possible) form"? If you completely ignored form, you could lead your junior down a path toward injury over time...especially lower back. I'm guessing the Dr. Rose means to prioritize speed.

If it goes right, it's a slice. If it goes left, it's a hook. If it goes straight, it's a miracle.

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Easier said then done - only cause the scores/swing suffer as you try and smash the ball.

We need/want to increase club head speed so I am actually thinking about not focusing on score for the next few months or even the year. I think it is the perfect age for him, he is only 12. He is basically done with US Kids and young to play AJGA. Does not need to win or qualify for anything..anyone agree with me?

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This goes back to the "Swing your swing" mantra. Nobody swings like DJ, Wolff, Reed, Couples, etc. so what does good or correct form even mean? I see coaches out there teaching all their kids the same exact swing and it kills me. Intentions are good because that's what the parents want (to have their kid win as a junior golfer) but long term I'm not sure it's beneficial. So many of these kids have already shot the best rounds they ever will in their lives, which to me is just sad.

There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.
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IMO that seems counter intuitive. What is the #1 measure of a good golfer? Score right? It isn't club head speed although that is an added plus. 12 is still young, but there should be other tours available for him as a stepping stone into AJGA. I highly doubt that if you told your kid to swing 110% for a year and not worry about score that he would be a better golfer after.

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Wolff is a great example as his backswing is very unique. His downswing looks very much the same as most professionals to me as he "simply" (for lack of a better word) gets into the slot. I agree they all are different, but somehow they are all the same (particular at the impact zone time).

 

I think what I was asking was does Dr. Rose assume that you at least have a fundamentally sound looking swing? Do they want you to at least have the kinetic sequence in somewhat of an order? Or just keep swinging fast and damn the torpedoes?

If it goes right, it's a slice. If it goes left, it's a hook. If it goes straight, it's a miracle.

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The thought process being that as you swing at 110 % your body, the match up, sequencing etc all adjust to that speed/feeling - and it becomes norm for you.

There are a lot tours available but there seems to be this window from like 12-14..where you are done with all this US Kids stuff...and if you want then you can really focus on long term development.

I do not know ..its just a thought, we are still a few months away from Spring season in the NE, I actually think it might hurt him in the Spring but he will have a better Summer/Fall as the distances (6100-6300yd) become less of an issue.

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Speed and athleticism will get you farther than hitting every fairway. Most kids I know that don't hit it very far are the Mike Weir's of junior golf... great for a minute but disappear later.

 

This thread should have been, What's your kids:

Vertical jumpSeated chest pass distance (5kg ball)Sit up chest pass distance (5kg ball)These are basic athletic movements that golfers use to generate speed.

There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.
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while speed is great I see with the older groups plenty of kids hit it far but when your in the other fairway or out of bounds your going to suffer.

some these boys hit super far but they they don’t have control over the ball. Control and speed is what wins.

you just need to drive the ball far enough to comfortably get the ball near the hole. I rather be 300 yard and in control then 350 and have no idea of where the ball will land.

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Once you get the speed down, the wedge game is flat out the most important thing a junior can work on. Tons of kids these days can pound the ball, but not many can get it within 10 feet with wedge in their hand. We played in an Arizona regional last weekend and the other two kids in our group put on an exhibition with their wedges. I'm taking within a foot from 30-50 yards out everytime. It was ridiculous.

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Building up core fitness is as important in golf as it is any sport, in addition to working on fast-twitch stuff. A routine with yoga and pilates mixed in can help with ensure flexibility and stave off injury.

While my kids don't have a traditional second "sport", much of what they do in karate class (warm up, weight-transfer, self-discipline) can apply to golf.

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i thinking working out is good at any age. I think post puberty you will see better results for sure. But even younger kids benefit a lot from regularly exercising. We started my 9 year old on a regular workout schedule so she develops good habits. When I say workout it is really just basic running and maybe using few machines like doing the bikes. We don’t do really any weights or anything serious.

you really should not have too do workouts with a 9 year because they usually have PE class at school but after seeing how watered down schools PE classes have become it is actually important to make sure they get out and actually work up a sweat once in a while.

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