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We live in a low spot in the county, nothing around to cause any flooding , but pump runs most of the year.

Anyone have a drainage tile installed, or done yourself? Did it make a significant difference?

Thanks

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They are completing a big city street project, small town, just got gutters and storm sewers.

i have a city lot behind me, slight down grade, and the just put in a honey drain at the edge of my property, is an outlet for my use.

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I work in Agriculture in IL and drainage tile works. My only recommendation would be if you are in sandier type soils look into putting socks on the tile. I deal with very clay based soil in KY for my job & tile is filling up w/ sediment because water peroculation rates are very slow & don’t have enough flow to flush out the sediment. Socks will help prevent that if that were a possible issue. I hope this helps. Best of luck with your problem

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I have done a decent amount of it and lots and lots of research.

As mentioned above you have to have a place for the water to exit that is lower than there you want to get water out of.

What drain tile does is essentially lower the water table getting rid of subsurface moisture. It is important to have good surface drainage (standing water) and subsurface drainage (wet/muddy areas)

What I like to do is have collection areas for surface water to drain into a basin and have the tile run into that to remove excess subsurface moisture then all exit the basin to a ditch/creek to get it off the course.

 

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I have the slope, and an output into the honey drain they just installed that flows right into the new storm sewers

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Another option if you dont have the slope and are truly in the lowest area around is something called a “dry well”. You basically dig out a pit where you want your water to collect (away from any possible future or present structures or driveways). Ones ive done in the past have been roughly 7’x7’ wide and 3’-4’ deep. Being a single family home on a city lot you can probably get away with putting in a much smaller one. Line the pit w/heavy duty landscape fabric then fill the pit up with 1” stone or crushed concrete. Run your drainage tile to the top of pit then a layer or two of heavy landscape fabric on top of the stone and cover w/4-5” topsoil. Google or youtube can probably give you great instructions if i didnt clarify very well. Ohh yea the dry well idea works best if you hit sand below your pit and will NOT work if pit is into the water table. Old boy once told me “hot water is on the left and water wont flow uphill”. Good words of wisdom?

What ever you do its very important to get water away from your house. Over time specially if you live where it freezes it will mess with your foundation causing much bigger problems. Ive seen it first hand where water pooling has caused poured walls to fail resulting in VERY expensive repairs. When i had my excavating business up in MI the builders we did work for all had us put tile around all new foundations before backfilling. And builders are tighter than banjo strings when it comes to money and unnecessary expenses.

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I also am in Illinois. We re-tiled our farm three years ago and have had great results. The clay tiles my grandfather hand-dug weren't cutting it anymore.

 

One thing to be sure of is knowing where the water is going to end up, and who it will affect. Not doing that could cause problems for other people.

 

We dealt with a local farm supply chain that did not properly account for the drainage from their facility and it affected our ground. I won't mention the company's name, but lets just say they sell products to supply a persons' FARM and FLEET.

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