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Who Says Mental Game is Overrated???: Broke My Personal Best by TWO SHOTS!!


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Obee,

 

this is is a great story and an outstanding golf weekend. Congrats. 

 

True, a grooved swing and the right mental frame are a killing combination. It’s  as if you went way past your comfort zone, isn’t it?

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Hello Fellow Golf Junkies!   A few things from my club championship this last weekend:   AGE IS JUST A NUMBER (I broke my competitive personal best by two shots at 53 years of age

Yeah, I wanted to circle back to this because I think Dan may have misunderstood my "acceptance" thing. What I mean by that is that us older guys have to accept that the WAY we shoot low scores is lik

Bro, you are your own worst enemy(though in reality, WhoTF isn't this not true of😂😂)!!!   There is absolutely NO REASON that you cannot achieve the outcomes that you achieved as a "kid" in y

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8 hours ago, 2bGood said:

Wow well done! Great write up and even better round.

 

By the way  to answer you question in the title- literally no qualified person has ever said the mental game is overrated  in golf. ?

 

I'm glad you picked up on that. There are a few, actually. Plenty of people nowadays are (understandably) on the "Strokes Gained" bandwagon and they trace all improvement back to Broadie's research (which was ground-breaking, and solid stuff, no doubt): Want to score better: Drive it farther and (kinda) straighter! And hit your approaches (especially from mid-distances) closer! Oh, and putt better, too!!!

 

Simple!

 

Except it's not, obviously.

 

I'm much more interested in how we come to improve those things -- especially "under the gun," so to speak.

 

There are inevitably people here (almost all of whom I respect), who, when the subject of improvement to scratch or below comes up, want to talk about what needs to improve to get better. But the minute someone brings up mental game, there are always detractors who mention that it's all about hitting better drives and approaches (mostly) and then get hot with the putter. Yes, yes. That is, indeed, the result we want (better shots that yield closer putts that yield ... lower scores!), but different people require different roads. For some, it's a straight path of lessons and repetition. For others it's trial and error. For still others, it's learning a whole new way to view the game. 

 

And for most, actually, it's a combination of the three, with each person requiring a bit more of one and a bit less of the others. 

 

I do know this: If one struggles to perform one's best under pressure, and indeed, plays worse (as many do), then focusing on the mental game is probably just as important as taking swing lessons -- for that person.

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2 hours ago, naval2006 said:

Obee,

 

this is is a great story and an outstanding golf weekend. Congrats. 

 

True, a grooved swing and the right mental frame are a killing combination. It’s  as if you went way past your comfort zone, isn’t it?

 

Not sure I was past my comfort zone, as I have shot 64 a couple times before, just never in competition. I actually felt perfectly comfortable until the tee shot on 17, and that was the only shot where I felt some angst. The rest of the time I certainly felt in a "heightened" state (adrenaline, competitive juices, etc.), but still "comfortable."

 

I do think I can tie/break the course record of 62, though. That might make me a bit uncomfortable down the stretch.... ?

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16 minutes ago, Obee said:

 

I'm glad you picked up on that. There are a few, actually. Plenty of people nowadays are (understandably) on the "Strokes Gained" bandwagon and they trace all improvement back to Broadie's research (which was ground-breaking, and solid stuff, no doubt): Want to score better: Drive it farther and (kinda) straighter! And hit your approaches (especially from mid-distances) closer! Oh, and putt better, too!!!

 

Simple!

 

Except it's not, obviously.

 

I'm much more interested in how we do come to improve those things -- especially "under the gun," so to speak.

 

There are inevitably people here (almost all of whom I respect), who, when the subject of improvement to scratch or below comes up, want to talk about what needs to improve to get better. But the minute someone brings up mental game, there are always detractors who mention that it's all about hitting better drives and approaches (mostly) and then get hot with the putter. Yes, yes. That is, indeed, the result we want (better shots that yield closer putts that yield ... lower scores!), but different people require different roads. For some, it's a straight path of lessons and repetition. For others it's trial and error. For still others, it's learning a whole new way to view the game. 

 

And for most, actually, it's a combination of the three, with each person requiring a bit more of one and a bit less of the others. 

 

I do know this: If one struggles to perform one's best under pressure, and indeed, plays worse (as many do), then focusing on the mental game is probably just as important as taking swing lessons -- for that person.

I think in a golf forum there's two sides: one that is much more focused on technique for different reasons, and a smaller world of competitive players that can relate to your story.  Definitely WRX is a heavily technique oriented site so your story may not be so appealing for a lot of members.  And indeed most golfers need better driving or putting because that must be a top priority for them.

 

If you are a more accomplished player trying to win a Club Championship or a regional tournament you will definitely have to focus on the mental side of competition, especially because when you're on the first tee it's you alone with your game, you need to hit the shots, try to score low and move on and on.  No time to check your backswing or transition when you need to execute the shots.  And if things don't go as you wished you still have to try to find a way not to collapse because tomorrow is another day.  The late Roberto De Vicenzo always used to say "at Tour level it's 10% the game and 90% the head."   

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57 minutes ago, Obee said:

 

I'm glad you picked up on that. There are a few, actually. Plenty of people nowadays are (understandably) on the "Strokes Gained" bandwagon and they trace all improvement back to Broadie's research (which was ground-breaking, and solid stuff, no doubt): Want to score better: Drive it farther and (kinda) straighter! And hit your approaches (especially from mid-distances) closer! Oh, and putt better, too!!!

 

Simple!

 

Except it's not, obviously.

 

I'm much more interested in how we come to improve those things -- especially "under the gun," so to speak.

 

There are inevitably people here (almost all of whom I respect), who, when the subject of improvement to scratch or below comes up, want to talk about what needs to improve to get better. But the minute someone brings up mental game, there are always detractors who mention that it's all about hitting better drives and approaches (mostly) and then get hot with the putter. Yes, yes. That is, indeed, the result we want (better shots that yield closer putts that yield ... lower scores!), but different people require different roads. For some, it's a straight path of lessons and repetition. For others it's trial and error. For still others, it's learning a whole new way to view the game. 

 

And for most, actually, it's a combination of the three, with each person requiring a bit more of one and a bit less of the others. 

 

I do know this: If one struggles to perform one's best under pressure, and indeed, plays worse (as many do), then focusing on the mental game is probably just as important as taking swing lessons -- for that person.

 

I find the concept pretty simple - physically allot of use could shoot 59 everyday IF we could hit the shot we are capable every time we want to. The challenge is doing it, and that all in our mind.

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That was a fun read. I too admit I was anticipating a miraculous ending with you holding out for the win. But you made a great charge in the final round that had to have affected Mr. Heath. Props to him for holding you off, especially on the final hole. That was clutch and I was happy he didn’t lose it by a mistake. You made him earn the championship and he did.

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Obee -Congrats on a great round and thanks for providing this level of detail in the description of your round.

 

Since my return to playing golf a year ago, I have come to the conclusion that, no matter one's handicap level, the mental game might just be the most important contributor to success on the course. The "spirit which I intend this comment" is that while one has to be able to get the ball into play off the tee and chip and putt with some level of competence, eliminating blow-up holes (double bogey and worse) and 3-putts goes a long way towards bringing scores down.

 

In my case as a high handicap player (who recently returned to the game after a 10-year layoff) it means the difference between not being able to break 100 and getting into the mid-90s (and next year breaking 90?).  In your case, it means shooting 64 instead of 68. 

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48 minutes ago, isaacbm said:

Can you expand on point 6? Acceptance...?

 

Yes, for sure. ?

 

It can mean quite a few things, but for me it means things like:

  1. ACCEPTING that I can only carry 3-wood 210 comfortably and 218(?) at the very most under perfect conditions with a perfect, perched lie.
  2. ACCEPTING that virtually every par 5 is now a 3-shot hole for me
  3. ACCEPTING that my back, right hip, and right oblique area will give me significant pain at some point in virtually every round
    1. Because of this, ACCEPTING that I will usually hit 1 or 2 really bad shots each round, no matter what
  4. ACCEPTING that I seem to be putting from the fringe with more success than chipping from the fringe
  5. ACCEPTING that I get nervous and "quick" down the stretch when I'm in contention. Accepting this allows me to expect it, which means I'm not freaked out by it. Then, I can plan to deal with it.

ACCEPTANCE, in many ways, requires significant self-knowledge -- as a golfer, of course, but also as a person. It is also, often, the opposite of SELF-JUDGMENT which, as a golfer (and a person!) is not good at all.

 

PRE-ACCEPTANCE is an even deeper concept that I like to apply directly to anything that can potentially or likely result in a negative outcome -- not just golf. For instance, if you are a sales person and you make cold calls, you should "pre-accept" before every call, that you may end up with a really upset/angry person on the phone, no matter what you do or how you handle the call. Pre-acceptance here allows you to make the call with no fear, because you've already realized -- and made peace with -- the worst that could happen.

 

In golf, I like to apply it to any really tough shot I have in front of me. If I pre-accept that I might just make double-bogey no matter how hard I try to execute the short-sided up-and-down par save in front of me (because it's a really tough one), then I have now removed that "fear" of making double-bogey, which frees me up to execute whatever shot I have chosen.

 

Honestly, it's kind of magic. And when I practice it well, I play my very best golf. 

 

Sometimes, though, I forget to do it when necessary (playing a "quick" round with buddies; focused on answering work emails when I'm playing a late afternoon round on a Thursday,) etc.

 

Keep in mind that I need every, single edge I can find in golf. I am routinely the shortest hitter in any tournament I play against solid competition. Sometimes by 20 yards. I am often out-driven by 50 to 70 yards by my opponent/fellow competitor and I simply must get the most out of everything I have in order to compete with the guys I play against. I can't just get by on "raw talent" and clubhead speed. I do have plenty of raw "hand-eye" talent, but that's about where my talent ends.

 

Hope that all makes sense. ?

 

 

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7 minutes ago, chippa13 said:

Since when has the mental aspect of sport been underrated?

 

See my response near the top of this page.

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1 hour ago, chippa13 said:

I'm just trying to find where the great epiphany is in all of this.

 

Are you new here? This has been my journey for 10+ years. I share my tournament experience and growth with others. We talk about playing our best "under the gun," and support each other, etc.

 

Epiphanies are rare in life. If you were looking for one here, I don't know what to tell you. 

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4 hours ago, Obee said:

 

I'm glad you picked up on that. There are a few, actually. Plenty of people nowadays are (understandably) on the "Strokes Gained" bandwagon and they trace all improvement back to Broadie's research (which was ground-breaking, and solid stuff, no doubt): Want to score better: Drive it farther and (kinda) straighter! And hit your approaches (especially from mid-distances) closer! Oh, and putt better, too!!!

 

Simple!

 

Except it's not, obviously.

 

I'm much more interested in how we come to improve those things -- especially "under the gun," so to speak.

 

There are inevitably people here (almost all of whom I respect), who, when the subject of improvement to scratch or below comes up, want to talk about what needs to improve to get better. But the minute someone brings up mental game, there are always detractors who mention that it's all about hitting better drives and approaches (mostly) and then get hot with the putter. Yes, yes. That is, indeed, the result we want (better shots that yield closer putts that yield ... lower scores!), but different people require different roads. For some, it's a straight path of lessons and repetition. For others it's trial and error. For still others, it's learning a whole new way to view the game. 

 

And for most, actually, it's a combination of the three, with each person requiring a bit more of one and a bit less of the others. 

 

I do know this: If one struggles to perform one's best under pressure, and indeed, plays worse (as many do), then focusing on the mental game is probably just as important as taking swing lessons -- for that person.

It’s so much easier to go down the rabbit hole of I need to improve my ball striking/

short game putting.  You’re a great example of how important the mental game is for scoring.  Thanks again for sharing your experience.

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1 hour ago, Obee said:

 

Yes, for sure. ?

 

It can mean quite a few things, but for me it means things like:

  1. ACCEPTING that I can only carry 3-wood 210 comfortably and 218(?) at the very most under perfect conditions with a perfect, perched lie.
  2. ACCEPTING that virtually every par 5 is now a 3-shot hole for me
  3. ACCEPTING that my back, right hip, and right oblique area will give me significant pain at some point in virtually every round
    1. Because of this, ACCEPTING that I will usually hit 1 or 2 really bad shots each round, no matter what
  4. ACCEPTING that I seem to be putting from the fringe with more success than chipping from the fringe
  5. ACCEPTING that I get nervous and "quick" down the stretch when I'm in contention. Accepting this allows me to expect it, which means I'm not freaked out by it. Then, I can plan to deal with it.

ACCEPTANCE, in many ways, requires significant self-knowledge -- as a golfer, of course, but also as a person. It is also, often, the opposite of SELF-JUDGMENT which, as a golfer (and a person!) is not good at all.

 

PRE-ACCEPTANCE is an even deeper concept that I like to apply directly to anything that can potentially or likely result in a negative outcome -- not just golf. For instance, if you are a sales person and you make cold calls, you should "pre-accept" before every call, that you may end up with a really upset/angry person on the phone, no matter what you do or how you handle the call. Pre-acceptance here allows you to make the call with no fear, because you've already realized -- and made peace with -- the worst that could happen.

 

In golf, I like to apply it to any really tough shot I have in front of me. If I pre-accept that I might just make double-bogey no matter how hard I try to execute the short-sided up-and-down par save in front of me (because it's a really tough one), then I have now removed that "fear" of making double-bogey, which frees me up to execute whatever shot I have chosen.

 

Honestly, it's kind of magic. And when I practice it well, I play my very best golf. 

 

Sometimes, though, I forget to do it when necessary (playing a "quick" round with buddies; focused on answering work emails when I'm playing a late afternoon round on a Thursday,) etc.

 

Keep in mind that I need every, single edge I can find in golf. I am routinely the shortest hitter in any tournament I play against solid competition. Sometimes by 20 yards. I am often out-driven by 50 to 70 yards by my opponent/fellow competitor and I simply must get the most out of everything I have in order to compete with the guys I play against. I can't just get by on "raw talent" and clubhead speed. I do have plenty of raw "hand-eye" talent, but that's about where my talent ends.

 

Hope that all makes sense. ?

 

 

So where is the line between acceptance and giving in? 

For example, you could have Accepted that you’re 53, injured, fat, a short hitter, etc and just “ Accepted  the fact that you’ll  never shoot under a certain number again in a tournament.

There’s a fine line between accepting that you’re going to make some terrible swings and making terrible swings because you’re expecting them! 
I personally have found that I can’t force low scores. Sometimes they just happen. Generally though I have to accept  that they arent going to happen every time. That’s one of my big issues: High expectations. If you were expecting greatness all of the time instead of Accepting that it only comes when you let it, you can get very frustrated.  Also, having shot multiple rounds of 60 and 61  in tournament competition when I was younger and a better player, I basically have to accept  that those days are likely incredibly few and far between going forward. Maybe never! 
One of the things that saddens me a little is that I will likely never shoot my lowest score again... unless I start playing executive par threes! 

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The difference is the glass is half full and half empty question. Accepting what you can do and has it's limits is an empowering attitude. Giving in to the you'll be never be able to do x is depressing and soul sapping. 

 

Makes me think of Tom Watson at The Open where he nearly won. 

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Acceptance is something we all can learn and it will be a key thing regardless of skill level. The hardest lessons for me once I decided I wanted to improve and start breaking scoring barriers was the mental side of the house. I'm not a good golfer but learning that a bad hole doesn't mean a round is toast and to try to handle adversity on the course without it bleeding into future holes is probably the biggest lesson for me to date, if I go in the tank mentally, forget it. For me, that took time on the course and wasn't as easy as reading a book or post. I had to work on it and experience it.

 

I don't play competitive golf and don't know if I'll ever break 80 but the original post still applies to me. It's great to read what people much better than I at this game have to say about how they play or even what they think is important. It's one of the things I love reading here since I don't have access to a mentor.

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First of all Obee, great tournament and write-up. It appears as if that putting change last year is paying off now. 

 

As far as the mental side and acceptance, it used to be my strong suit and I used it many times against others in competitions whether golf, shooting, you name it. I had the confidence to fly the space shuttle if I could only get behind the yoke!! 

 

Three years ago that all began to change. Physically I was slowing down and shots I used to make were now impossible, regardless how much harder I practiced and tried. It started to effect every facet of the game. So in April of this year after a stern self-talking to I finally accepted I wasn't playing good enough to be a +2-3 and what I was doing wasn't gonna turn things around. So I started to get back to basics and began to strike the ball like I used to but realize it's gonna be 5% or in some cases more, shorter. I got back to basics in the short game and putting and started playing more "old man golf". Accepting the bad shots and good as well. Never too high on the good nor too low or negative on the bad. Just pull the shade down when you exit the hole and move on. 

 

What I'm struggling to say is initially I thought the physical side of the game was letting me down but in retrospect it was the mental side and lack of acceptance of my physical limitations. After finally accepting I wasn't gonna carry the ball 300 yards anymore my game has turned around and I'm trending back in the right direction. Hell, I'm even having fun again!

 

Thanks again for sharing Obee,

Todd

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2 hours ago, isaacbm said:

So where is the line between acceptance and giving in? 

For example, you could have Accepted that you’re 53, injured, fat, a short hitter, etc and just “ Accepted  the fact that you’ll  never shoot under a certain number again in a tournament.

There’s a fine line between accepting that you’re going to make some terrible swings and making terrible swings because you’re expecting them! 
I personally have found that I can’t force low scores. Sometimes they just happen. Generally though I have to accept  that they arent going to happen every time. That’s one of my big issues: High expectations. If you were expecting greatness all of the time instead of Accepting that it only comes when you let it, you can get very frustrated.  Also, having shot multiple rounds of 60 and 61  in tournament competition when I was younger and a better player, I basically have to accept  that those days are likely incredibly few and far between going forward. Maybe never! 
One of the things that saddens me a little is that I will likely never shoot my lowest score again... unless I start playing executive par threes! 

Apparently there’s a big deal of grinding in Obee. If you’re a grinder you don’t give in that easily. I’ve also been through reminiscing the good old times until I realised they were gone. Acceptance of your present game and improving and grinding it out are part of the search for scoring. 

 

A specific source of motivation is of great help to set a goal and focus. Especially as one grows older and a bit weary and finds in golf a shelter from the daily routine. 

 

 

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Freakin' awesome, Obee! ??

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6 hours ago, Obee said:

 

Yes, for sure. ?

 

It can mean quite a few things, but for me it means things like:

  1. ACCEPTING that I can only carry 3-wood 210 comfortably and 218(?) at the very most under perfect conditions with a perfect, perched lie.
  2. ACCEPTING that virtually every par 5 is now a 3-shot hole for me
  3. ACCEPTING that my back, right hip, and right oblique area will give me significant pain at some point in virtually every round
    1. Because of this, ACCEPTING that I will usually hit 1 or 2 really bad shots each round, no matter what
  4. ACCEPTING that I seem to be putting from the fringe with more success than chipping from the fringe
  5. ACCEPTING that I get nervous and "quick" down the stretch when I'm in contention. Accepting this allows me to expect it, which means I'm not freaked out by it. Then, I can plan to deal with it.

ACCEPTANCE, in many ways, requires significant self-knowledge -- as a golfer, of course, but also as a person. It is also, often, the opposite of SELF-JUDGMENT which, as a golfer (and a person!) is not good at all.

 

PRE-ACCEPTANCE is an even deeper concept that I like to apply directly to anything that can potentially or likely result in a negative outcome -- not just golf. For instance, if you are a sales person and you make cold calls, you should "pre-accept" before every call, that you may end up with a really upset/angry person on the phone, no matter what you do or how you handle the call. Pre-acceptance here allows you to make the call with no fear, because you've already realized -- and made peace with -- the worst that could happen.

 

In golf, I like to apply it to any really tough shot I have in front of me. If I pre-accept that I might just make double-bogey no matter how hard I try to execute the short-sided up-and-down par save in front of me (because it's a really tough one), then I have now removed that "fear" of making double-bogey, which frees me up to execute whatever shot I have chosen.

 

Honestly, it's kind of magic. And when I practice it well, I play my very best golf. 

 

Sometimes, though, I forget to do it when necessary (playing a "quick" round with buddies; focused on answering work emails when I'm playing a late afternoon round on a Thursday,) etc.

 

Keep in mind that I need every, single edge I can find in golf. I am routinely the shortest hitter in any tournament I play against solid competition. Sometimes by 20 yards. I am often out-driven by 50 to 70 yards by my opponent/fellow competitor and I simply must get the most out of everything I have in order to compete with the guys I play against. I can't just get by on "raw talent" and clubhead speed. I do have plenty of raw "hand-eye" talent, but that's about where my talent ends.

 

Hope that all makes sense. ?

 

 

Wow!  I think you just explained to me why when I feel like I'm not trying it works out pretty well.  PRE-ACCEPTANCE.  Played a quick 9 today,  they had just aerated the greens.  My mind-set said "well no reason to expect much today because of holes and sand".  

Hit 6 greens.   Birdied both par 5's  (4 footer,  and 2 footer)  Saved par once from just off the green.  The other time from 100 yards after making a 15 footer or so.   The entire time I had already Pre-Accepted that it was going to be what it was going to be.  I had this easy calm about pretty much everything.  Hit a few trees on drives,  laid the sod over one and saved par from 100 out.  Just did my thing and didn't let it bother me.  Ended up 1 under.  Easy Peasy.

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6 hours ago, isaacbm said:

So where is the line between acceptance and giving in? 

For example, you could have Accepted that you’re 53, injured, fat, a short hitter, etc and just “ Accepted  the fact that you’ll  never shoot under a certain number again in a tournament.

There’s a fine line between accepting that you’re going to make some terrible swings and making terrible swings because you’re expecting them! 
I personally have found that I can’t force low scores. Sometimes they just happen. Generally though I have to accept  that they arent going to happen every time. That’s one of my big issues: High expectations. If you were expecting greatness all of the time instead of Accepting that it only comes when you let it, you can get very frustrated.  Also, having shot multiple rounds of 60 and 61  in tournament competition when I was younger and a better player, I basically have to accept  that those days are likely incredibly few and far between going forward. Maybe never! 
One of the things that saddens me a little is that I will likely never shoot my lowest score again... unless I start playing executive par threes! 


Son, we need to talk ...

 

?

 

I think I can shoot 59. In fact it would not surprise me if one day in the next five years I shot 59 at Victoria. If you think by "acceptance," I am accepting that I am no longer capable of my best golf, you have it all wrong. I'm a better player today than I ever was when I hit it 40 yards farther and was never injured. 
 

 

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13 hours ago, Obee said:

 

Yes, for sure. ?

 

It can mean quite a few things, but for me it means things like:

  1. ACCEPTING that I can only carry 3-wood 210 comfortably and 218(?) at the very most under perfect conditions with a perfect, perched lie.
  2. ACCEPTING that virtually every par 5 is now a 3-shot hole for me
  3. ACCEPTING that my back, right hip, and right oblique area will give me significant pain at some point in virtually every round
    1. Because of this, ACCEPTING that I will usually hit 1 or 2 really bad shots each round, no matter what
  4. ACCEPTING that I seem to be putting from the fringe with more success than chipping from the fringe
  5. ACCEPTING that I get nervous and "quick" down the stretch when I'm in contention. Accepting this allows me to expect it, which means I'm not freaked out by it. Then, I can plan to deal with it.

ACCEPTANCE, in many ways, requires significant self-knowledge -- as a golfer, of course, but also as a person. It is also, often, the opposite of SELF-JUDGMENT which, as a golfer (and a person!) is not good at all.

 

PRE-ACCEPTANCE is an even deeper concept that I like to apply directly to anything that can potentially or likely result in a negative outcome -- not just golf. For instance, if you are a sales person and you make cold calls, you should "pre-accept" before every call, that you may end up with a really upset/angry person on the phone, no matter what you do or how you handle the call. Pre-acceptance here allows you to make the call with no fear, because you've already realized -- and made peace with -- the worst that could happen.

 

In golf, I like to apply it to any really tough shot I have in front of me. If I pre-accept that I might just make double-bogey no matter how hard I try to execute the short-sided up-and-down par save in front of me (because it's a really tough one), then I have now removed that "fear" of making double-bogey, which frees me up to execute whatever shot I have chosen.

 

Honestly, it's kind of magic. And when I practice it well, I play my very best golf. 

 

Sometimes, though, I forget to do it when necessary (playing a "quick" round with buddies; focused on answering work emails when I'm playing a late afternoon round on a Thursday,) etc.

 

Keep in mind that I need every, single edge I can find in golf. I am routinely the shortest hitter in any tournament I play against solid competition. Sometimes by 20 yards. I am often out-driven by 50 to 70 yards by my opponent/fellow competitor and I simply must get the most out of everything I have in order to compete with the guys I play against. I can't just get by on "raw talent" and clubhead speed. I do have plenty of raw "hand-eye" talent, but that's about where my talent ends.

 

Hope that all makes sense. ?

 

 

Your definition of Pre-Acceptance is what I classify to myself as having NO fear of failure in a more general way. It's critical to performing in any sport and specially in high level sports. You see it in timid play all the time in various sports at the college and pro level. It's definitely unique in golf because that battle plays out between you and the course. In some ways it's even tougher. There's typically no coach or teammates out there that can help you slow down or pick you up when needed. It's one area where good tour caddies I imagine can help a ton out there with talking through a tough shot at a critical juncture. 

 

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8 hours ago, nitram said:

First of all Obee, great tournament and write-up. It appears as if that putting change last year is paying off now. 

 

As far as the mental side and acceptance, it used to be my strong suit and I used it many times against others in competitions whether golf, shooting, you name it. I had the confidence to fly the space shuttle if I could only get behind the yoke!! 

 

Three years ago that all began to change. Physically I was slowing down and shots I used to make were now impossible, regardless how much harder I practiced and tried. It started to effect every facet of the game. So in April of this year after a stern self-talking to I finally accepted I wasn't playing good enough to be a +2-3 and what I was doing wasn't gonna turn things around. So I started to get back to basics and began to strike the ball like I used to but realize it's gonna be 5% or in some cases more, shorter. I got back to basics in the short game and putting and started playing more "old man golf". Accepting the bad shots and good as well. Never too high on the good nor too low or negative on the bad. Just pull the shade down when you exit the hole and move on. 

 

What I'm struggling to say is initially I thought the physical side of the game was letting me down but in retrospect it was the mental side and lack of acceptance of my physical limitations. After finally accepting I wasn't gonna carry the ball 300 yards anymore my game has turned around and I'm trending back in the right direction. Hell, I'm even having fun again!

 

Thanks again for sharing Obee,

Todd


I definitely need to come back to this. The journey to our best golf is an interesting one. Thank you so much for sharing this. It's late and I have a tournament tomorrow morning early. And I may have had four or five cocktails… ?

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11 hours ago, SNIPERBBB said:

The difference is the glass is half full and half empty question. Accepting what you can do and has it's limits is an empowering attitude. Giving in to the you'll be never be able to do x is depressing and soul sapping. 

 

Makes me think of Tom Watson at The Open where he nearly won. 


Every time I think I can't play some of my best golf, I remember that Tom Watson almost won THE Open when he was almost 60 years old...

 

 

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[size=2]PING G400 Max - Atmos Tour Spec Red - S
TaylorMade Sim Max Titanium 15* 3-WOOD - Diamana - S
Titleist 818 H2 19*. Tensei black 90g - S
Titleist 818 H1 21* Atmos Tour Spec Blue - S
Adams Idea Tech V4 5H 25* ProLaunch Blue 75 HY x-stiff
Adams Idea Tech V4 6H 28* ProLaunch Blue 75 HY x-stiff
Adams Idea Tech V4 7H 32* ProLaunch Blue 75 HY x-stiff
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Titleist AP2 716 9i 42* KBS Tour S
Cleveland RTX-4 mid-bounce 46* DG s-400
Cleveland RTX-4 mid-bounce 50* DG s-400
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Cleveland RTX-4 low-bounce 60* DG s-400
Odyssey Works Versa Tank 1W (bent to 76.5*)[/size]

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11 hours ago, isaacbm said:

So where is the line between acceptance and giving in? 

For example, you could have Accepted that you’re 53, injured, fat, a short hitter, etc and just “ Accepted  the fact that you’ll  never shoot under a certain number again in a tournament.

There’s a fine line between accepting that you’re going to make some terrible swings and making terrible swings because you’re expecting them! 
I personally have found that I can’t force low scores. Sometimes they just happen. Generally though I have to accept  that they arent going to happen every time. That’s one of my big issues: High expectations. If you were expecting greatness all of the time instead of Accepting that it only comes when you let it, you can get very frustrated.  Also, having shot multiple rounds of 60 and 61  in tournament competition when I was younger and a better player, I basically have to accept  that those days are likely incredibly few and far between going forward. Maybe never! 
One of the things that saddens me a little is that I will likely never shoot my lowest score again... unless I start playing executive par threes! 

I think that line depends on the person. For some that kind of self talk may steer them toward making a double. That person might need the "I can hit this shot" kind of self talk. If I know I can hit the shot, but am too worried about "what I don't and double", Accepting that double could happen even if you hit a good shot frees you up execute the shot more often than not. 

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