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Home schooling for golf (or other sports)


Bizzle80
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3 minutes ago, Bizzle80 said:

One of my daughters coaches just told me that a bunch of the top kids (girls in this case) are being home schooled so they can practice multiple hours a day. This is crazy to me...but I guess makes sense when I see some of the low scores these girls are putting up.

 

Is this a regular thing for people? 


 

public school has attendance requirements. So basically if you want to travel to tournaments in other states you either do private school or virtual.

 

There are also ton of golf academies and schools kids attend.

 

At the end of the day it more about that makes sense for your kid. Some kids do horrible with virtual and some kids can’t stand the dorm life

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5 hours ago, tiger1873 said:

At the end of the day it more about that makes sense for your kid. Some kids do horrible with virtual and some kids can’t stand the dorm life

This is great advice. One of my kids did virtual school when she was competing at a high level. It worked out great as she had plenty of socialisation through her sport and the unscheduled school time worked better for her than the ;show up at 8am and study for 5 hours' vibe of normal school. The personal responsibility  required for that type of school also worked well and helped her transition to university really well. Saying all that, this type of school was a terrible fit for another one of my kids and would have been really bad move for him.

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It's hard to address this without getting into the political side of it but I will try.  We have been fortunate enough to homeschool our kids since they were school age  (in our state, you didn't have to start reporting for school until 7 years of age.  Our kids started schooling at around 4).  This has nothing to do with sports or other activities at all.  Laws vary by state.  However, with homeschooling you have flexibility.  You can do multiple days in one day (again, that depends on the child as well).  Field trip days count as school days (and this is flexible as well).  I took my daughter to the U.S. Open in 2016.  It counted as a school day (Pennsylvania history since Oakmont is a landmark in PA and crosses the PA Turnpike, among other reasons).  As long as the child can keep up with the school work, it can go very well (many days , our kids are completed by noon.  Our older daughter will sometimes choose to do 3 days in one day.  She sometimes spends "off" days with my parents as they are remodeling their house.  She has learned basic geometry through woodworking.  She also knows how to use many tools (including power tools).  She also spends extensive time sewing and quilting.  She crocheted me  a headcover once a couple years ago  :)  I tell my kids, "Do not let your schooling interfere with your education" .  I believe Mark Twain first said that.

 

There are still attendance requirements for homeschooling (again, the laws vary by state).  We essentially never stop schooling  throughout the year. We can start counting days sometime in July.  They usually have their yearly required work done by March or so (I think last years we had around 220 days in that counted as school days and it wasn't overly intesive). 

 

Most homeschoolers I know do work far beyond any requirements.  I'm sorry this is long-winded, but my point is homeschooling could open up your time to use as you choose.  If that is to allow more time for golf practice, so be it.

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2 hours ago, Medson said:

 

My biggest growth in the last 18 months is I am no longer surprised by what parents would do for their kids. Nothing is crazy to me anymore. 


Why would you be surprised someone chose a non traditional school.

 

This  question really does not have anything to do with golf.
 

Public schools have lots of issues some people have good public schools while others have issues where your kid can get shot.

 

Add  in strict requirements  and it plain why people seek alternatives.

 

private schools used to be perfect but with technology more people can choose virtual.

 

some these virtual schools have harder requirements then public school. 
 

We choose virtual for my kids because quite frankly the public school had kids with issues and i will leave it that.


virtual school for is has turned out to be great the flexibility is huge. It also benefits their golf game.  The truth is the lifestyle has resulted in kids who prefer to play golf then play video games and do social media.

 

we know other kids that do the same thing. We all agree it’s been a good thing and the kids are all well rounded.

 

How ever some kids we know who do not have an activity they enjoy like golf do not do well and it can be a very bad experience.

 

if your kid likes golf you can afford to do tournaments then virtual and home school may work. 
 

ultimately this is a parent and their kids decision. 

 

 

 

 

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On 10/4/2021 at 7:14 PM, Anser3 said:

It's hard to address this without getting into the political side of it but I will try.  We have been fortunate enough to homeschool our kids since they were school age  (in our state, you didn't have to start reporting for school until 7 years of age.  Our kids started schooling at around 4).  This has nothing to do with sports or other activities at all.  Laws vary by state.  However, with homeschooling you have flexibility.  You can do multiple days in one day (again, that depends on the child as well).  Field trip days count as school days (and this is flexible as well).  I took my daughter to the U.S. Open in 2016.  It counted as a school day (Pennsylvania history since Oakmont is a landmark in PA and crosses the PA Turnpike, among other reasons).  As long as the child can keep up with the school work, it can go very well (many days , our kids are completed by noon.  Our older daughter will sometimes choose to do 3 days in one day.  She sometimes spends "off" days with my parents as they are remodeling their house.  She has learned basic geometry through woodworking.  She also knows how to use many tools (including power tools).  She also spends extensive time sewing and quilting.  She crocheted me  a headcover once a couple years ago  🙂  I tell my kids, "Do not let your schooling interfere with your education" .  I believe Mark Twain first said that.

 

There are still attendance requirements for homeschooling (again, the laws vary by state).  We essentially never stop schooling  throughout the year. We can start counting days sometime in July.  They usually have their yearly required work done by March or so (I think last years we had around 220 days in that counted as school days and it wasn't overly intesive). 

 

Most homeschoolers I know do work far beyond any requirements.  I'm sorry this is long-winded, but my point is homeschooling could open up your time to use as you choose.  If that is to allow more time for golf practice, so be it.

It's great to hear PA is at least somewhat friendly to homeschooling families.  Lucky for us, FL is both golf and homeschool friendly year-round.  We have a syllabus to take us all the way through the end of the year at the co-op my kids attend (two days in the classroom, the rest at home) which gives us not only a blueprint, but also an opportunity to work ahead if needed.

 

The old socialization stereotype is pretty unfair for homeschool kids, especially ones who play sports, music, scouts/trail life, martial arts, etc... Every time someone wants to point at the introverted Lexi Thompson, I point to Tim Tebow.  Middling professional athlete, elite extroverted personality he continues to make money off of.

 

When my wife and I originally looked at the possibility of being homeschool parents, we attended a national homeschool conference in Orlando at Gaylord Palms.  There must have been 5,000 people there over the course of a weekend.  The kids attending the conference with their parents did a good job of selling me on the idea of home schooling, way more than the adults and their workshops did.  What I saw were focused kids with long attention spans and good manners.  I saw kids reading school material during the workshops, and then socializing like young adults during downtime.  A group of five middle school and high school kids took turns on the grand piano outside of one of the ballrooms, playing Chopin, Beethoven and Gershwin like absolute bosses.  If this is what kids can achieve, how they can behave, and how they can interact as products of homeschooling--I was very okay with that.  The idea of this, of my kids being without the yoke of the traditional classroom, was one I started to embrace a little.  

 

Six years later, it's not all roses and unicorns prancing in open fields--but it's our concept, our journey.  I don't need to wait for the class field trip, I go to the zoo, science center, state capitol, oldest continued settlement in America (St. Augustine), Kennedy Space Center, or wherever I want to take the kids and I don't have to worry about anyone's peanut allergies, strep throat, or bad restaurant decision.

 

Now, not all kids are going to become concert-level pianists as a teen the same way that they won't all become the next Pano if they are homeschooled.  My son and daughter get crushed by the best golfers from Palm Beach, Orlando and Jacksonville, and quite possibly will for years to come.  Do I take advantage of being able to practice during the day a few "school days" during the week?  You bet I do.  Do I keep them doing academics during the summer?  Absolutely.  As hot as it is in FL, I would almost prefer to have half the school year during summer and save golf for the other seasons.

 

While they are going to keep at the golf grind, they like other things, too.  My 10-year-old daughter sews, is our resident wildlife expert and is becoming quite the sketch artist.  My 8-year-old son does math two grades above, is an obsessive Formula-1 buff who argues race craft with the announcers, and he wants to be an engineer in the racing world when he grows up.  Two very different kids, same household, same homeschool path.  Both kids are very comfortable socializing with adults, but also have friends their age.

 

As for me, and my socialization, that is a different story as the primary educator.  There are weeks where the only adult I talk to is my wife, the lady at the carline at co-op, and the dude outside the pro shop who tells me which cart to take.  I need a pre-COVID Vegas weekend like no other these days, filled with insane buffet trips, going all-in on the flop with a flush draw and standing in front of the Bellagio like it's my first time seeing the fountain show.  But again this year, I may not get my release.  That's where the real sacrifice is--but so far, I've mostly been up to it.  

 

Getting to spend the extra time with my kids is great (is spite of my Vegas pining) and I am glad for not knowing any other way at this point.

Edited by MB19
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Whether done or not probably depends on the parent's resources, ability and political persuasion, plus how awful school leadership and teachers are in a given area. 

 

 

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5 hours ago, MB19 said:

It's great to hear PA is at least somewhat friendly to homeschooling families.  Lucky for us, FL is both golf and homeschool friendly year-round.  We have a syllabus to take us all the way through the end of the year at the co-op my kids attend (two days in the classroom, the rest at home) which gives us not only a blueprint, but also an opportunity to work ahead if needed.

 

The old socialization stereotype is pretty unfair for homeschool kids, especially ones who play sports, music, scouts/trail life, martial arts, etc... Every time someone wants to point at the introverted Lexi Thompson, I point to Tim Tebow.  Middling professional athlete, Elite extroverted personality he continues to make money off of.

 

When my wife and I originally looked at the possibility of being homeschool parents, we attended a national homeschool conference in Orlando at Gaylord Palms.  There must have been 5,000 people there over the course of a weekend.  The kids attending the conference with their parents did a good job of selling me on the idea of home schooling, way more than the adults and their workshops did.  What I saw were focused kids with long attention spans and good manners.  I saw kids reading school material during the workshops, and then socializing like young adults during downtime.  A group of five middle school and high school kids took turns on the grand piano outside of one of the ballrooms, playing Chopin, Beethoven and Gershwin like absolute bosses.  If this is what kids can achieve, how they can behave, and how they can interact as products of homeschooling--I was very okay with that.  The idea of this, of my kids being without the yoke of the traditional classroom, was one I started to embrace it a little.  

 

Six years later, it's not all roses and unicorns prancing in open fields--but it's our concept, our journey.  I don't need to wait for the class field trip, I go to the zoo, science center, state capitol, oldest continued settlement in America (St. Augustine), Kennedy Space Center, or wherever I want to take the kids and I don't have to worry about anyone's peanut allergies, strep throat, or bad restaurant decision.

 

Now, not all kids are going to become concert-level pianists as a teen the same way that they won't all become the next Pano if they are homeschooled.  My son and daughter get crushed by the best golfers from Palm Beach, Orlando and Jacksonville, and quite possibly will for years to come.  Do I take advantage of being able to practice during the day a few "school days" during the week?  You bet I do.  Do I keep them doing academics during the summer?  Absolutely.  As hot as it is in FL, I would almost prefer to have half the school year during summer and save golf for the other seasons.

 

While they are going to keep at the golf grind, they like other things, too.  My 10-year-old daughter sews, is our resident wildlife expert and is becoming quite the sketch artist.  My 8-year-old son does math two grades above, is an obsessive Formula-1 buff who argues race craft with the announcers, and he wants to be an engineer in the racing world when he grows up.  Two very different kids, same household, same homeschool path.  Both kids are very comfortable socializing with adults, but also have friends their age.

 

As for me, and my socialization, that is a different story as the primary educator.  There are weeks where the only adult I talk to is my wife, the lady at the carline at co-op, and the dude outside the pro shop who tells me which cart to take.  I need a pre-COVID Vegas weekend like no other these days, filled with insane buffet trips, going all-in on the flop with a flush draw and standing in front of the Bellagio like it's my first time seeing the fountain show.  But again this year, I may not get my release.  That's where the real sacrifice is--but so far, I've mostly been up to it.  

 

Getting to spend the extra time with my kids is great (is spite of my Vegas pining) and I am glad for not knowing any other way at this point.

 

 

Our kids are in a co-op as well (2 times per month) and I agree 100% on the socialization thing.  Our kids have contact (meaningful contact) than most public school kids do (church, co-op, their field trip groups, etc). My wife is our primary educator and other than seeing me and folks at church, she will go a few days at a time without face-to-face contact with other adults. 

 

Our youngest has taken an interest in golf (she is left-handed, which made it an adventure to find clubs). She has a Callaway junior set  (it is a boys set but she liked it because she likes the color orange and the clubs were the X2 Hot clubs).    She wants to get her clubs out again this weekend after her football game  (she cheers for pee-wee football).

 

 

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It all comes down to parents either way. Those of you that make home schooling work are putting in effort and your kids will 100% be successful adults. Those of you with kids in public school who are paying attention, will be successful as well. If spending every day mastering golf is valuable to your kid then do it. My kids would hate it.

 

My kids love public school. They attend a small rural school. They are involved in everything they can. They love playing sports in packed gyms in front of screaming class mates. They are leaders of clubs (FFA , Honor Society) and are constantly busy with sports or community activities. My youngest(8th grade) is the most athletic and she loves lifting weights with the gym rats after school before practices. 

 

Public schools have lots of trouble though. There are tough to manage kids in there. There are also bad teachers, and feckless administrations. 

 

I had a long conversation with my sophomore this morning, as she is having trouble with one of her team mates on the volleyball team. Normal HS team drama stuff. The talk was about how a leader gets people that they don't necessarily like to do things that help the team. I could see her realizing that she was going to have to step up to solve the problem, and it is going to be hard. The lessons learned in doing that, to me are very important. I hire young people out of college and so many would not even consider having a difficult conversation with someone, let alone leading a group of people.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/7/2021 at 2:58 PM, Uncle_Buck2 said:

I played junior golf at a high level and attended public school. 99% of relevant junior tournaments are during the summer, if your game isn't progressing on a public/private school schedule then you probably aren't practicing efficiently and you are probably going to struggle in college golf. 

 

I wouldn't buy it, if you look at WAGR or the AJGA rankings the majority of those players are attending school. Nothing against home schoolers, it's not a bad option, it's just not a necessity to play great golf. 

 

 

This really depends on what state you live in. Public school in some states will not look kindly if you have unexcused absences which a top golfer will most likely get.

 

I know for a fact in Texas some kids were forced to go to private or home school because they have very strict attendance laws at public schools.  The parents actually get fined if you miss too many days and you have to explain why your kid was not in school in front of a judge.

 

 Florida is not as strict so you can get by with missing a few days here and there so you will see kids attend public school. 

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1 hour ago, tiger1873 said:

 

 

This really depends on what state you live in. Public school in some states will not look kindly if you have unexcused absences which a top golfer will most likely get.

 

I know for a fact in Texas some kids were forced to go to private or home school because they have very strict attendance laws at public schools.  The parents actually get fined if you miss too many days and you have to explain why your kid was not in school in front of a judge.

 

 Florida is not as strict so you can get by with missing a few days here and there so you will see kids attend public school. 

Not really. I grew up in Texas and played in the public school system, no complaints here. I didn't know a single student that was "forced" to go to a private school. In fact, all of the top juniors in the state played for public schools when I was in high school. I was ranked top 20. The Texas 6A public school system has more golf competition than any other state, it's extremely beneficial for college golf. Especially since Texas structures their school tournaments like collegiate events.  

 

I never mentioned missing school though... Like I said, most relevant junior tournaments are during the summer, so missing school is hardly ever necessary for highly ranked junior events like Junior Am, most AJGA events, and invitationals.

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I was told recently by a College Coach I am close to that he passes on home schooled students.  He also said many of the better schools pass over them.  The PC answer most of the time is they don't care if they are home schooled, but I can tell you they do in their little world.  They want kids that can handle time management between school, study, and practice.  Traditional Students in college generally handle that rigorous load better, whereas a home schooled student can practice any time they want.

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2 hours ago, tiger1873 said:

 

 

This really depends on what state you live in. Public school in some states will not look kindly if you have unexcused absences which a top golfer will most likely get.

 

I know for a fact in Texas some kids were forced to go to private or home school because they have very strict attendance laws at public schools.  The parents actually get fined if you miss too many days and you have to explain why your kid was not in school in front of a judge.

 

 Florida is not as strict so you can get by with missing a few days here and there so you will see kids attend public school. 

 

I'm not sure where you're getting this info. I played college golf with several kids from Texas and ALL of them went to a public high school.

 

They had zero issues with being able to play in junior tournaments and obviously had no issues with being recruited either.

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43 minutes ago, Uncle_Buck2 said:

Not really. I grew up in Texas and played in the public school system, no complaints here. I didn't know a single student that was "forced" to go to a private school. In fact, all of the top juniors in the state played for public schools when I was in high school. I was ranked top 20. The Texas 6A public school system has more golf competition than any other state, it's extremely beneficial for college golf. Especially since Texas structures their school tournaments like collegiate events.  

 

I never mentioned missing school though... Like I said, most relevant junior tournaments are during the summer, so missing school is hardly ever necessary for highly ranked junior events like Junior Am, most AJGA events, and invitationals.

 

 

Public schools can have very strict attendance rules.  I suggest you read this article if you do not believe me.  

 

https://starlocalmedia.com/allenamerican/news/truancy-in-collin-county-what-can-be-done-to-keep-teens-out-of-court/article_a21cecc8-579b-52e1-a72a-358f00ca284a.html

 

Public schools don't work for everyone.  We lived in Texas and parents pulled their kids out of public school because they were fined.  The district wants kids in seats for funding.   Why deal with that if you need or want flexibility.  It's easy to put your kid in Private school or Home school and that is what you do. Doing that free's up your schedule.

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7 minutes ago, heavy_hitter said:

I was told recently by a College Coach I am close to that he passes on home schooled students.  He also said many of the better schools pass over them.  The PC answer most of the time is they don't care if they are home schooled, but I can tell you they do in their little world.  They want kids that can handle time management between school, study, and practice.  Traditional Students in college generally handle that rigorous load better, whereas a home schooled student can practice any time they want.

 

This should be obvious to anyone who homes schools.  No reason to think that schools would support you if you went out their system.

 

At the same time a public university may not be a good fit either if you truly like Home School or even virtual options.   The nice thing is there are plenty of schools out there that will work for anyone.

 

Playing golf for college is all about the education your going to get.  Some times I think kids lose focus on that part of it.

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50 minutes ago, tiger1873 said:

 

This should be obvious to anyone who homes schools.  No reason to think that schools would support you if you went out their system.

 

At the same time a public university may not be a good fit either if you truly like Home School or even virtual options.   The nice thing is there are plenty of schools out there that will work for anyone.

 

Playing golf for college is all about the education your going to get.  Some times I think kids lose focus on that part of it.

The best bet in that case is a DIII school.  When on Athletic Scholarship at a DI or DII school they own you and your time.

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1 hour ago, tiger1873 said:

 

 

Public schools can have very strict attendance rules.  I suggest you read this article if you do not believe me.  

 

https://starlocalmedia.com/allenamerican/news/truancy-in-collin-county-what-can-be-done-to-keep-teens-out-of-court/article_a21cecc8-579b-52e1-a72a-358f00ca284a.html

 

Public schools don't work for everyone.  We lived in Texas and parents pulled their kids out of public school because they were fined.  The district wants kids in seats for funding.   Why deal with that if you need or want flexibility.  It's easy to put your kid in Private school or Home school and that is what you do. Doing that free's up your schedule.

Nobody is disagreeing with you on attendance laws, I'm aware of state economics. I'm simply saying that it is not necessary to miss school to play superb golf at a junior level, since most junior events are during the summer. 

 

Additionally, 10 days per semester is NOT strict. I played Division 1 golf and we did not miss that many days of class during the regular season. 

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8 minutes ago, Uncle_Buck2 said:

Nobody is disagreeing with you on attendance laws, I'm aware of state economics. I'm simply saying that it is not necessary to miss school to play superb golf at a junior level, since most junior events are during the summer. 

 

Additionally, 10 days per semester is NOT strict. I played Division 1 golf and we did not miss that many days of class during the regular season. 

 

This is an interesting statement.  While there are plenty of events in the summer, a big bulk of a junior's schedule is February through May in Florida, Texas, and California.  My kid is playing HS golf right now along with mixing in a couple of other events.  He is an "A" student, so I don't care how much school he misses.  As it stands right now for Golf outside of HS he will miss 5 days this semester.  This semester for just HS golf he will miss a total of 10 days.  That is 15 days of school for this semester.

 

My daughter played D1 college golf over the past 4 years and they would miss at least 10 days a semester.

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5 minutes ago, heavy_hitter said:

 

This is an interesting statement.  While there are plenty of events in the summer, a big bulk of a junior's schedule is February through May in Florida, Texas, and California.  My kid is playing HS golf right now along with mixing in a couple of other events.  He is an "A" student, so I don't care how much school he misses.  As it stands right now for Golf outside of HS he will miss 5 days this semester.  This semester for just HS golf he will miss a total of 10 days.  That is 15 days of school for this semester.

 

My daughter played D1 college golf over the past 4 years and they would miss at least 10 days a semester.

Right, but golf within the school is not considered an absence since it is approved by the school district. So legally he is only "missing" five days of school. 

 

Generally men's college tournament travel on the weekend, first round is Sunday or Monday, second round is Monday or Tuesday, sometimes all three if you don't play 36 the first day. We ALWAYS returned on Tuesday nights. There are exceptions to this with higher end tournaments, but that generally the format for the majority of Men's events. Also, you're not considered absent if you're attending the class virtually, just because you're physically not on campus does not necessarily mean you're absent so it does not count toward your allotted absences. 

 

There's a large difference between golf outside of school vs. school sponsored tournaments. It's important to distinguish between the two. 

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43 minutes ago, Uncle_Buck2 said:

Nobody is disagreeing with you on attendance laws, I'm aware of state economics. I'm simply saying that it is not necessary to miss school to play superb golf at a junior level, since most junior events are during the summer. 

 

Additionally, 10 days per semester is NOT strict. I played Division 1 golf and we did not miss that many days of class during the regular season. 

 

10 days is not a lot days because if you are late they mark it you as an absentee.  The other problem is not 10 days total but if you miss more then a few days it can be an issue.

 

If you play a lot junior golf at a high level you are going to end up missing days of school. There are some large national events in the spring and fall.   Granted the event may be over the weekend but your forgetting about travel time to and from the event.

 

Top Juniors are all doing non sponsored school events.  If they only did high school chances there no where near the top ranked kids. There doing AJGA and that requires heavy travel.

 

I am sure some plan around the time your can miss but seriously it's a lot stress for everyone. So it makes sense to just do an alternative.  The advantage of being at a tournament a few days before it begins is huge you can extra practice round in. 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, tiger1873 said:

 

10 days is not a lot days because if you are late they mark it you as an absentee.  The other problem is not 10 days total but if you miss more then a few days it can be an issue.

 

If you play a lot junior golf at a high level you are going to end up missing days of school. There are some large national events in the spring and fall.   Granted the event may be over the weekend but your forgetting about travel time to and from the event.

 

Top Juniors are all doing non sponsored school events.  If they only did high school chances there no where near the top ranked kids. There doing AJGA and that requires heavy travel.

 

I am sure some plan around the time your can miss but seriously it's a lot stress for everyone. So it makes sense to just do an alternative.  The advantage of being at a tournament a few days before it begins is huge you can extra practice round in. 

 

 

 

This is turning into a moot point.

 

All I'll say is Jimmy Walker, Scottie Scheffler, Kelly Kraft, Abraham Ancer, Ryan Palmer, the Coody brothers and many other Texans played in the state's public school system and they turned out alright. Never said private or home-school was a bad option, just that it's not a requirement to play golf at the highest level as a junior.  

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Just a guess, but the majority home school parents don't really prioritize athletics, and certainly don't prioritize athletics over the reasons they don't send their kids to a traditional school.  If GA Southern or Nova doesn't want to recruit my kids because they are home schooled (never mind the fact they would have to improve leaps and bounds for this to happen), I can't say that it would have any impact on our lives.  If my kids have to apply to these schools for undergrad in hopes they will be taken, it would impact my family massively because something has gone very wrong.

 

And who knows?  Maybe I burn out in a year or two and the kids do end up in a more traditional school?  It definitely won't make golf any more of a priority if that happens, and it likely won't change how much time they spend on the golf course for better or worse.  We'll still practice hard and compete, but just days after my daughter got dusted by a field that only included two of the top 10 kids her age in the state it has reinforced that education needs to be more important than anything else.

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Our picks

    • 2022 Farmers Insurance Open Photos - 26 WITBs & New Gear- Discussion and Links
      Please put any questions or comments here
       
      General Albums - 
       
      2022 Farmers Insurance Open - Monday #1
      2022 Farmers Insurance Open - Monday #2
      2022 Farmers Insurance Open - Monday #3
      2022 Farmers Insurance Open - Monday #4
       
       
      WITB Albums - 
       
      Hideki Matsuyama - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Sung Kang - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Adam Long - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Brandon Wu - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Jimmy Walker - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Sam Burns - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Xander Schauffele - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Trey Mullinax - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Daniel Berger - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      James Hahn - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Phil Mickelson - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Aaron Wise - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Justin Thomas - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Lee Hodges - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Jordan Spieth - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Cameron Champ - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Kyle Stanley - WITB - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
       
       
      Pullout Albums - 
       
      New Super Stroke grip - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Tour Aim alignment aids - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Swag Golf: Hideki's caddie bowing at Augusta, signed headcovers – 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Dylan Frittelli's Callaway Apex TCB Sand Wedge (1-of-1 proto) – 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      Bryson DeChambeau's Cobra King LTDx 5-degree driver – 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      NeuroPeak Pro NTel Belt - 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
      JumboMax JMX Zen Lite grips – 2022 Farmers Insurance Open
       
      Cameron Champ WITB has the new Ping i525

       
      Bryson's WITB has the new Cobra LTDx Driver 

       
      Phils new Rogue Driver

       
      Bryson's LAGolf Shaft in the driver

       
      Xander has the triple diamond "S" driver

       
      New SuperStroke grips for 2022

       
        • Thanks
      • 8 replies
    • 2022 The American Express WITB Photos (Spotted: New gear for 2022) - Discussion & Links
      Please put and comments or questions here
       
       
      Scotty Cameron putters - 2022 American Express
      New Taylor-Made putters - 2022 American Express
      New Odyssey putters - 2022 American Express
      New Axis 1 model putter - - 2022 American Express
      Patrick Cantlay - WITB - 2022 American Express
      Mitsubishi MMT putter shaft - 2022 American Express
      Ping putter - 2022 American Express
      Abraham Ancer - WITB - 2022 American Express
      Jason Dufner - WITB - 2022 American Express
      Will Zalatoris - WITB - 2022 American Express
      The Surgeon 6109 wedge - 2022 American Express
      LA Golf "DJ Series" shafts (2022 American Express)
       
       
       
      2022 American Express - Monday #1
       
       
       
       
      • 40 replies
    • Sony Open Pics from January 11, 2022 Part 1
      I was able to get out to the Sony Open today to take a few pics.  I guess due to Covid precautions they kept the spectators pretty far from the players.  Also due to camera restrictions they've put in place, I wasn't able to bring the big lens like I normally do. Hopefully they'll ease up on the ropes and I'll be able to get more pics tomorrow!
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 22 replies
    • 2022 Callaway Rogue ST drivers (in-hand photos)
      2022 Callaway Rogue ST Max driver
       

       
      2022 Callaway Rogue ST Max D driver
       
      2021 Callaway Rogue ST Max 
       
      2022 Callaway Rogue ST Max LS driver

       
      2022 Callaway Rogue ST Triple Diamond LS

       
      Rogue ST exploded views
        • Like
      • 218 replies
    • Titleist Vokey SM9 Link on Wedge Works Coming Soon- UPDATED Pics Added Pg 4
      Looks like there is a link on Titleist Wedge Works for the new Vokey SM9, but doesn't show any photos yet.
       
      https://www.vokey.com/product/WM137.html#start=4
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 237 replies

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