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Shower Thought: Does "Swing to Right Field" fix everything in the downswing?


RCGA
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I'm battling a slightly steep downswing that has my path a few degrees in at impact. I'm trying to get more shallow and be more inside-out at impact. I've tried a lot of different drills, but most had me shanking the ball more than I'd like (for whatever reason).

 

I read a throw away comment here a few months ago - something to the effect of "just swing to right field". I remembered that comment today and decided give it a go. I'm very happy with the result (the difference is night and day), but wondering if this feeling may introduce problem(s) down the road. I only have an indoor net and video so I can't see the actual ball flight. Obviously there's some calibration as to where in right field you're swinging. 

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15 minutes ago, RCGA said:

I'm battling a slightly steep downswing that has my path a few degrees in at impact. I'm trying to get more shallow and be more inside-out at impact. I've tried a lot of different drills, but most had me shanking the ball more than I'd like (for whatever reason).

 

I read a throw away comment here a few months ago - something to the effect of "just swing to right field". I remembered that comment today and decided give it a go. I'm very happy with the result (the difference is night and day), but wondering if this feeling may introduce problem(s) down the road. I only have an indoor net and video so I can't see the actual ball flight. Obviously there's some calibration as to where in right field you're swinging. 

Of course there could be a downside, everything can be over done. lets say your path was 5 degrees in before the change, and now you are 2 degrees out. Perhaps over the course of swinging to right field over a month, your path goes from 2 out to 5 out. Now you are dealing with pushes and hooks.

 

My swing thought has always been keep the shoulders closed and drop the arms to about hip high, then rotate through and exit left after hitting the ball. I like the feeling of arms and torso being "connected" and rotating together through impact.

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23 minutes ago, RCGA said:

I'm battling a slightly steep downswing that has my path a few degrees in at impact. I'm trying to get more shallow and be more inside-out at impact. I've tried a lot of different drills, but most had me shanking the ball more than I'd like (for whatever reason).

 

I read a throw away comment here a few months ago - something to the effect of "just swing to right field". I remembered that comment today and decided give it a go. I'm very happy with the result (the difference is night and day), but wondering if this feeling may introduce problem(s) down the road. I only have an indoor net and video so I can't see the actual ball flight. Obviously there's some calibration as to where in right field you're swinging. 

I noticed I hit thins and hooks when I over do it. But it did fix my very steep and in to out swing and I am hitting it straighter now with occasional draws and pull draws. 

 

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One thought alone won't ever "fix everything in the downswing", in my opinion.

 

But it could be a good thought for you.

 

There is also "feel vs. real". Someone might feel like they're swinging to right field, but actually have a neutral path.

 

I think the key is that you have your body moving correctly. If your weight shift and rotation is all good, you have room to swing "out to right field" or right up the middle, with no issues.

 

But if your body is not rotating properly, swinging out to right field isn't going to do much either way. 

 

I tend to think posture, alignment, pivot, rotation, etc. are more important and the swing plane is not hard to fix if you have those things correct. Or your swing plane already tends to be great if you have those things correct. 

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5 minutes ago, Krt22 said:

It can introduce a ton of issues if overdone, when most people try to swing to right field, they do so by excessively tilting away from the target.  This prevents the proper pressure shift and stalls out rotation and forces a flip at the bottom. The end result is path too far to the right (shanks, blocks, hooks), which also creates low point issues (thins and fats). 

 

Ask me how I know lol

This - and his other lovely friend; let's slide way over there to give me room, for my arms and club to swing from the inside to right field -> stalled pivot / flip save... ask me how I know

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this is something i need to work on... sounds like we have a very similar swing... 

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I have seen the “swing to right field”thought help before.  For me personally, it seems like a band aide that falls off after a few swings.  That is one of those mental things more than a swing change IMO and we golfers are mental in SO many ways what may work for some obviously can’t help us all.  Go for it and if working, try to understand the physical change you are making when it works.  Then try to understand the physics of what is going on between club face and ball and try to hang on to all of it for a while.

At least that is how my brain has to work.  Then once I am hitting crisp shots with the flight I want, I can then start missing 2 foot putts:-)

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8 minutes ago, jwhite86 said:

this is something i need to work on... sounds like we have a very similar swing... 

My problem in 2021 was that I'd come in steep and hit a pull, or I'd try to save it by early extending, flipping at the bottom and hitting a weak push. Having a miss that's 30y left and 30y right off the tee isn't playable. 

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TaylorMade SIM UDI 18* // Diamana Thump 100 x-flex

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Vokey // SM7 50-54-58 // TT X100

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Personally not a fan of swing to right field because eventually you are going to likely find yourself dealing with another issue (stuck/too in to out path etc.) Best suggestion is to get a lesson to find out exactly why you're steep but...for a simple drill since we're on golfwrx and we love drills I like the below:

 

Hard to explain but set an alignment stick down where its directly below your hands parallel to your feet, then take another alignment stick or club and put it behind that alignment stick (away from target) but at a slight angle pointing to the right. Take a practice swing where you go up to the top, shallow the club while controlling the clubface and at p6, try to get your club in line with the back alignment stick/club. Kind of looks like this:

 

Hit That Dream Draw and forget about your Shocking Slice!

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54 minutes ago, Zitlow said:

Just my take, in the backswing you create energy and in the downswing you release the energy OUT to the ball.

 

Use the right side starting from the ground up. As the left heel goes down the right heel goes up releasing the right side so it can swing the COG into the ball. 

 

I like to think, since we can't create energy,  of pulling energy out of the ground and then returning that energy back to where it came from.   Environmentalists would be happy.

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Worst swing thought and intent I was ever given but at the time (pre Monte) it was the playbook advice and I got it from a good teacher so I’m not complaining and I went with it and ……… thank goodness I found out what I needed and then what I needed and we’ll see how stubborn my swing is come spring!

Countdown to The Masters has begun!

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The proof of the pudding is if your actual ball striking hitting off of grass is improving If it is then don’t listen to anyone , just continue what you are doing .

The thought of  swinging more to right field can be a viable thought  to help shallow provided it is not exaggerated , provided it is not accompanied by dropping the right shoulder excessively and or accompanied by excessive lateral motion . 
The golf swing is a chain reaction to what has come before . Some golfers are talented enough to make compensations in transition to correct poor backswings . Most are not. Ultimately you need to make changes that places you in a better place at the top. 

Edited by golfarb1
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2 hours ago, milesgiles said:

 

incorrect

Agree.  Often, biting into a net when you’re trying to fix a poor motor pattern is better than being biased by ball flight.  Obviously ball flight is king, but if you’re working a specific motor pattern change to ultimately improve ball flight…

 

There’s a reason I had so many great successes improving people during the march-August 2020 lockdown.  Everyone was working motor pattern changes into a $50 Amazon hitting net and they didn’t have inconsistent results deterring them.  

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3 minutes ago, MonteScheinblum said:

Agree.  Often, biting into a net when you’re trying to fix a poor motor pattern is better than being biased by ball flight.  Obviously ball flight is king, but if you’re working a specific motor pattern change to ultimately improve ball flight…

 

There’s a reason I had so many great successes improving people during the march-August 2020 lockdown.  Everyone was working motor pattern changes into a $50 Amazon hitting net and they didn’t have inconsistent results deterring them.  

 

my original answer to him was ruder, had to edit..

 

 

 

 

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Swing to right field is just lazy over-simplification of the real issues.  The correct "result" is a swing path somewhat in to out but the face square to the path.  How you get there efficiently is the issue and the more efficient you are the less you even need to think of this.  The more you guide this path, the more trouble you will get into with band aid approaches and less speed.

 

Now given all this, visuals on the ground can really help.  Once in awhile, I will put two parallel alignment sticks on the ground fairly narrow between them to show a path I want to visualize.  The ball sits near the end of the path and the logo on the range ball on the inside left.  I put another ball on the same path but in front.  So the idea is swing along the path and catch the ball from the inside but hitting it out to the right a bit.  But again, it's the visual.  What I am really working on is a the correct setup, pressure shifting / pivot.  Get the body active, use the visual to let the brain organize the path.

 

Net result is it is a bit over doing it, but that's the point of a "drill".  Do this for 5 or so swings.  Then step aside from all that visual, and hit a ball to the target without the crutches.  Full circle, just thinking swing to right field is far too vague and introduces other compensations.  

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The potential danger of swinging out to right field or any feel for that matter is that eventually you can overdo it and this one is easy to overdo on your own without introducing the necessary pieces that will neutralize the path. Not sure if you’ve followed any of GGs stuff over the years, but when students come to his lesson tee swinging across the ball excessively and not rotating very much, after evaluating the setup and grip, one of the first things he does is have them swing out to right field and flip it for a while until the path is out to the right excessively. If as a beginner the person became a slicer because the clubface was too open, they will often swing across the ball as a method of squaring the face. His theory is that if you’re pulling the arms across the ball, you will never be able to rotate. Once the student is slinging it out to the right, he teaches them to “rotate” to neutralize the path and calm down the face a little. To say something extremely oversimplified is that IMO the arms should create the outward swing direction and the body should help create the inward swing direction and to some degree they cancel out each other. 

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15 minutes ago, MPStrat said:

The potential danger of swinging out to right field or any feel for that matter is that eventually you can overdo it and this one is easy to overdo on your own without introducing the necessary pieces that will neutralize the path. Not sure if you’ve followed any of GGs stuff over the years, but when students come to his lesson tee swinging across the ball excessively and not rotating very much, after evaluating the setup and grip, one of the first things he does is have them swing out to right field and flip it for a while until the path is out to the right excessively. If as a beginner the person became a slicer because the clubface was too open, they will often swing across the ball as a method of squaring the face. His theory is that if you’re pulling the arms across the ball, you will never be able to rotate. Once the student is slinging it out to the right, he teaches them to “rotate” to neutralize the path and calm down the face a little. To say something extremely oversimplified is that IMO the arms should create the outward swing direction and the body should help create the inward swing direction and to some degree they cancel out each other. 

The dangers are even greater than just over doing it.

 

if you’re steep in transition, the only thing right field will get you is early right tilt…or worse a major pelvic thrust…or both.

 

Getting the club face too open is another instant no no.

 

This is true of anything.  If you’re not addressing the root cause, you’re making things worse.

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23 minutes ago, MonteScheinblum said:

The dangers are even greater than just over doing it.

 

if you’re steep in transition, the only thing right field will get you is early right tilt…or worse a major pelvic thrust…or both.

 

Getting the club face too open is another instant no no.

 

This is true of anything.  If you’re not addressing the root cause, you’re making things worse.


Good points, I agree with what you’re saying and in this case, the root cause of slicing the ball for a huge percentage of mid to high handicaps is a wildly open clubface. So then hypothetically you fix the root cause and the golfer is still pulling the ball and swinging -10 because they have used the path to square the face for 20 years with a scooping motion. So what GG does, is teach them to supinate the lead arm with some awareness that they’re swinging to the right. All of a sudden (and I’ve actually seen this happen) the scoop is gone, the ball is starting right and drawing but the path is now +8 or +9. That’s when he teaches the body movements to neutralize the path. So like I said, swinging to right field on your own for 3 years.. bad. An experienced teacher using this as one part of a lesson to fix a 10 year slicer.. different story altogether. 

Edited by MPStrat
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