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Bobby Jones Pelz

 

Don’t let the classic look fool you; no other wedge packs this much technology. The body is cast from a soft stainless steel. A pocket and deep set channels are then milled to accommodate the wear-resistant German alloy Cronidur 30 Face material. The holes or channels behind the face insert remove substantial weight from the central section of the body and allows the reposition of this weight to the sole for a very low C.G. A classic shape with true cavity-back forgiveness.

  • Bobby Jones Mens Pelz Series Wedges feature: Loft/Bounce: 52°/4° • 56°/10° • 56°/14° • 60°/4° • 60°/8° • 64°/4°
  • Steel shaft available in Wedge flex
  • Available in right-hand only

Designed For The Most Discriminating Golfers!

 

 

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Picking up the Ortiz Wedges, I first notice the differences in the grip -- Jesse uses a Lamkin Tour Black Grip and the texture grabs your hands. Lamkins scream quality to me. The grip is midsized to help tempo and stabilize the swing on partial shots.

 

Quality extends to the shafts, which are made by the same company that manufactures KBS Tour Shafts (Femco in Taiwan). The wedge is cast from 302 steel, and Ortiz uses a 3M product to heat the insert and attach it. The face insert is a very hard milled material but the adhesive reduces harshness because the feel is very forged-like. The shape of the body of the wedge is rounded, compact and classic with a non-glare finish. They are a welcome surprise. The overall weight reduces is hefty to help tempo.

 

Everyone wants to know about spin - When chipping, you see the ball check and release a foot or two with good contact. If you don't make good initial contact, you get some roll (just like any wedge). I only got the super checkers- hit and stop on the spot, when I placed the ball in back of the stance, and hit down with steepness. I don't get the shredding with the Ortiz wedge that super aggressive grooves produce. With good contact pitches, you get drop and stop with a decent ball. Out of the rough, the club is small, yet hefty enough to propel you through the thick stuff. Just stick with decent tempo and trust the club.

 

As to consistency and accuracy, the Ortiz wedge is consistent, accurate and forgiving. It feels so stable throughout the swing on partials -- this maybe due to the balance and weight. It was clearly superior for me than other wedges. Surprisingly so. I found it easier to produce little touch shots with the Ortiz. I could just relax and let the shot go. At the same time, you've got to be open to a heftier wedge -- it does not feel as light or maneuverable as the typical wedge -- you've got to balance the tradeoffs for yourself.

 

The Ortiz 56 actually has a little more spin than non other premium wedges The Ortiz was easier to control. I also found the Ortiz 56 quite easy out of fluffy sand. It didn't want to dig. Even poor efforts got the ball up and out. Better swings got the ball up nicely with spin.

 

As to the 60, I don't see why you can't hit the standard bounce off hardpan and tight lies. For me, its edge lays low to the ground and I don't use much, if any, forward press. In fact, the low bounce version would be for real pickers of the ball. For me, any less bounce from the standard bounce 60, and I wouldn't be able to get aggressive at all. As to the standard bounce, I still think it's tuned to the side of shallow angles of attack.

 

Summary

 

In play, I find the Ortiz wedges very accurate and very playable around the greens. Because my GIR % is low, I have a lot of partials around the greens and these are great for delicate shots you needed to get close to the hole for those crucial one putts. I think it's the overall balance and weight of the clubs that help on full and partial shots. They contribute to a smoother tempo and less handsiness that translates to shots that end up closer to the hole. I think players who need improvement in tempo will benefit greatly from these wedges. At the same time, they don't feel as light as the typical wedge. You'll have some tradeoffs with a heavier wedge. The 60 in standard is more tuned to the side of shallow. I've played them since August 08. The more I play them, the more I like them. Give them time.

 

Update: The Ortiz Wedges come in Standard and Low Bounce Versions -- be sure to specify which bounce you want. Jesse is also adding a 48 degree to the lineup in 2009. In this way, you'll have a PW or can make it a gap by weakening the loft if you want a 50. The 56 Standard has sufficient bounce to strengthen it to 54 and still have plenty of bounce, and the 56 low bounce can be weakened to 58 and still have sufficient bounce. In other words, you can have a 50, 54, 58 setup that can serve your needs.

Father, Wannabe Golfer, Observer of Peeps, Wannabe Novelist

 

  • Ping G425 Max 10.5 (at 9)/TPT 19Hi Golf Shaft @45.5 in.
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 9 (at 10) TPT 19 Hi @44 in. (Driver 2)
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 3HL/MMT60
  • Ping G425 4H/TPT Golf
  • Mizuno 223 5-PW/Recoil 95
  • Artisan 50, 55, 59/Nippon 105 
  • Artisan 0321 Putter

 

 

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No graphite option, and no lie adjustment option offered on the website.

I assume that they use the American 64° lie angle rather than the Japanese 63°.

I like 63º and graphite. If that's do-able, an up to five-piece (with the addition of the 49°) Pelz set makes for an intersting proposition.

 

 

Go to www.bobbyjonesgolf.net, find the contact number at Hayward, CA, and tell them you're interested in the wedges but need the Custom Shop for questions as to shafts.

Father, Wannabe Golfer, Observer of Peeps, Wannabe Novelist

 

  • Ping G425 Max 10.5 (at 9)/TPT 19Hi Golf Shaft @45.5 in.
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 9 (at 10) TPT 19 Hi @44 in. (Driver 2)
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 3HL/MMT60
  • Ping G425 4H/TPT Golf
  • Mizuno 223 5-PW/Recoil 95
  • Artisan 50, 55, 59/Nippon 105 
  • Artisan 0321 Putter

 

 

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  • 4 months later...

8/31/2008

 

At the PGA Show in January 2008, the Dave Pelz - Jesse Ortiz Wedges were unveiled. An indestructible milled face insert was unique to this wedge lineup. Jesse Ortiz stated that his wedges have a forged like feel even though the head is cast. Is the forged-like claim true? What about the insert?

 

Bottom Line: These wedges are stroke savers on the course. If you lack consistency in your short game, want the forged-like direct feel in a cast head with perimeter weighting, the look of a traditional compact blade and wedges that assist with tempo and provide excellent spin, playabiity and consistency, you'll want to take a look at Pelz/Ortiz lineup of (48, 52, 56, 60, 64) wedges with various bounce combos.

 

The first difference you notice is the weight of the club and the grip. The overall weight of the club is slightly heavier and Pelz uses a Lamkin Tour Black Midsize Grip - the texture grabs your hands. Lamkins always said "quality" and the midsize grip is consistent with the Pelz philosophy of gripping down on the club for more delicate shots, enabling you to get a full grip on the club. The thicker grip also quiets the hands, helping provide for consistent, high quality shot-making.

 

Milled Indestructible Insert, Perimeter Weighting and Weight

 

The wedge shafts are made by the same company that manufactures KBS Tour Shafts (Femco in Taiwan) and are of a weight comparable to the typical 125-130g heavier wedge shaft.

 

The head is made of 302 steel, with some hollowing out of the interior to redistribute weight to the perimeter. But the club has the look of a traditional blade. The hitting area is an indestructible milled insert and Jesse Ortiz uses a 3M product to heat the insert and attach it. The insert is a very hard milled material but the adhesive absorbs vibrations.

 

The shape of the body is compact and classic with flowing lines. They are a welcome surprise. The overall weight of the club is slightly heavier and combined with the thicker grip, reduces handsiness, and helps smooth out tempo. The swingweight is the typical D4-D5 according to Jesse Ortiz. The overall weight and the grip contribute to short game consistency.

 

Forged-Like Feel

 

This is the surprising part. Even though the head is cast, the feel of the club is soft and direct due to the 3M insert which softens up the hard insert and eliminates unwanted vibration. As to sound, it is not as crisp/click like the true forging in a Scratch but most haven't tried Scratch - and will appreciate what Ortiz has tried to do with the Pelz Wedges.

 

Spin

 

Excellent - everyone wants to know about spin. Warning -- spin is about technique, making clean contact with the ball and using urethane golf balls. The spin is comparable to Vokey and Callaway MD Grooves in that the Pelz/Ortiz wedge has only slightly less spin than the previously mentioned crazy-spin wedges -- you could tell the difference by looking at the first hop. I don't get the shredding with the Ortiz wedge that other aggressive grooves will produce. With any wedge, you get more immediate braking power by opening the wedge very slightly -- which is easy to do with the Pelz Wedge. The slightly added bounce by opening the clubface did give me better contact and more drop and brake on a dime action.

 

What makes these wedges unique are the overall weight/balance, the thicker grip and the milled insert for spin durability and consistency in spin. Ortiz claims that the insert is so durable that you will not have to replace the wedge due to lack of spin performance. That's good news for those of us who practice the short game for hours on end.

 

In a comparison between the 56 degree SW between the Pelz/Ortiz and the Callaway X Forged with normal U grooves, the Pelz/Ortiz wedge does a better job of checking. I also found the Ortiz 56 quite easy out of fluffy sand. It didn't want to dig. Even poor efforts got the ball up and out. Better swings got the ball up nicely with spin.

 

Consistency and Accuracy

 

This is where these clubs shine! As to consistency and accuracy -- the Ortiz wedge was hands down more consistent, accurate and forgiving than other OEM Wedges. It feels so stable throughout the swing on partials -- this maybe due to the balance and weight. It was clearly superior for me. Surprisingly so. I found it easier to produce little touch shots with the Ortiz Wedges. I could just relax and let the shot go. I can safely say that the overall weight and balance of the Pelz/Ortiz Wedge does help you over the typical OTR Wedge in terms of consistent good shots -- and that's what most of us want - consistent good shots.

 

The final test is the course. I played last week and the Pelz/Ortiz wedge was dynamite for its consistency. I had a couple of 85 yard approaches with the 56 wedge that landed 6 and 7 feet from the hole and I was able to sink the putts. The ball stopped within 2 feet of its mark. Around the greens, the 56 and 60 wedges were magic on partial shots. Again, I was able to gain uncanny accuracy on most shots within 50 yards, allowing me to sink some putts for par. Once again, the overall weight of the club helped tempo and contributed to a better shot. It was also very easy to grip down the club.

 

I was able to hit the gap wedge (52) several times. It was accurate and easy -- once again, the weight promotes better tempo even though these wedges might not be the longest clubs for distance.

 

As to the grind of the 60-08 -- we normally don't have lush lies in N. Texas. I thought the standard 8 degree bounce was fine (they do have a low bounce 4 deg option). The sole of the 60 is medium with a trailing edge grind. I was able to open up the club and the leading edge remained close to the ground. Flops off tightish lies are no problem. I didn't get any dig with this grind.

 

As to club length, Pelz likes to decrease length in each wedge as the lofts increase in order to gain more consistency in ball striking. They seem to have .25 inches between wedges. As to bounce, the 56 and 60 are available in a low bounce option for those who consider themselves more of a picker. For more info, you can see the video and order at www.bobbyjonesgolf.net at $120.

 

What's not to Like?

 

The Pelz/Ortiz Wedges are excellent tools if you are open to the benefits of a wedge that is slightly heavier in overall weight. They arrive with a midsize grip that you may want to change. But give that grip a try -- on partial shots, they help! Overall, the wedges provide excellent consistency, spin and playability around the greens. They are in the bag for a long term test. I've spent most of my time with the 56 and 60, but the 52 also produces fine shots from the fairway. I'm still working with the 64 -- it gets through the crud and rough with ease and is reliable on chips just off the green with a flag staring in your face.

 

As to the grind, that depends on your swing and conditions. The Pelz grind appears to be an overall compromise to appeal to most golfers. You can vary the bounce a bit with ball position and press. The sole width appears medium but there is grinding towards the trailing edge to give you more versatility/playability. The standard bounce should appeal to most golfers but it's definitely a different grind than other makers. I'd say the 60 is a grind more for those who sweep/slide/drive rather than those who take deep divots or are extremely aggressive.

 

As Jesse Ortiz says, some guys comment about the heft of the wedge, but when he explains the reasons for the weight, a light goes off in their heads. The heavier weight provides more consistency. He has received several letters from golfers stating that they've holed out in their first efforts on the course with his wedges from off the green. As Jesse stated, Pelz knows what he is talking about when it comes to knowing what many golfers need in a wedge.

 

Bottom Line: If you want more accuracy and consistency from your wedge game for better scoring, give the Pelz/Ortiz Wedges a serious look and see if they fit your game.

Father, Wannabe Golfer, Observer of Peeps, Wannabe Novelist

 

  • Ping G425 Max 10.5 (at 9)/TPT 19Hi Golf Shaft @45.5 in.
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 9 (at 10) TPT 19 Hi @44 in. (Driver 2)
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 3HL/MMT60
  • Ping G425 4H/TPT Golf
  • Mizuno 223 5-PW/Recoil 95
  • Artisan 50, 55, 59/Nippon 105 
  • Artisan 0321 Putter

 

 

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Long Term Review Update: April 27, 2009

 

I am still playing the Bobby Jones Pelz Wedges from Jesse Ortiz -- Jesse added a 48 Pitching Wedge to the lineup this winter -- I am still dialing it in, but it is a versatile addition to the lineup in that you can bend it a couple of degrees if you need a 50 degree wedges and add 2 deg of bounce at the same time to get the bounce to 6 degrees (from 4).

 

The 56-14 is great from the sand -- it won't dig in the sand and is a great fairway club. They also have a 10 deg version.

 

The 60-08 is tremendous from all lies -- open it and the leading edge remains close to the ground. I can even do the Phil Mickelson lob where you open it all the way and it just goes about 10 yards straight up and goes dead.

 

I've used the 64 and gaining more comfort from this high loft. No need to open it -- Just lay it square -- it is a great club when you are just off the green and have a close flag. Just make a normal accelerating move to the ball and it plops up, lands and dies within a couple of feet of landing for a gentle roll to the hole. It is also great from greenside rough. The slightly heavier club and the midsize grips means you have great stability and smoothness on partial shots.

 

After 8 months, the grooves still are deep and newish -- no nicks at all. So if you want a wedge with current groove technology that will last several years, the price was reduced from $150 to just under $120 and represents great value and performance.

 

I can't say enough good things about the consistency and accuracy of these wedges.

Father, Wannabe Golfer, Observer of Peeps, Wannabe Novelist

 

  • Ping G425 Max 10.5 (at 9)/TPT 19Hi Golf Shaft @45.5 in.
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 9 (at 10) TPT 19 Hi @44 in. (Driver 2)
  • Callaway Rogue ST Max 3HL/MMT60
  • Ping G425 4H/TPT Golf
  • Mizuno 223 5-PW/Recoil 95
  • Artisan 50, 55, 59/Nippon 105 
  • Artisan 0321 Putter

 

 

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