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Ben Hogan fans..good news!


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New book by a Hogan disciple of a disciple
Good news!

The link here goes to a web site desrcibing a forthcoming book by Tom Bertrand, a long time assistant to John Schlee, who learned from Hogan -- the Hogan techniques Hogan never revealed in his Five Lessons. Bertrand worked for Schlee for several years, teaching the principles Schlee learned from Mr. Hogan. While Schlee's book entitled Maximum Golf revealed much of what Schlee learned from Ben Hogan and their teacher-pupil relationship, Bertrand's book to be published in September this year is anxiously awaited.


http://www.thesecretofhogansswing.com/

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  • 4 weeks later...

How many people will sell books with this promiss of Hogan's "secret"?

 

This is at least #3 I know of, not to mention the Life Magazine spread long ago.

 

I do think it's pretty cool that Hogan is still so highly thought of that people can make a buck trying to sell his "secrets". The reality is, he out-worked everyone, including today's golfers. No one has ever worked as hard as Hogan when it comes to striking a golf ball. He literally ground it out of the dirt.

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How many people will sell books with this promiss of Hogan's "secret"?

 

This is at least #3 I know of, not to mention the Life Magazine spread long ago.

 

I do think it's pretty cool that Hogan is still so highly thought of that people can make a buck trying to sell his "secrets". The reality is, he out-worked everyone, including today's golfers. No one has ever worked as hard as Hogan when it comes to striking a golf ball. He literally ground it out of the dirt.

 

:cheesy:

 

Great post, the other thing I just thought about . . . Whatever secrets Hogan did have, were related to eliminating the hook that plauged his career.

 

How many golfers have trouble fighting the left side of the fairway?

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Thanks for the compliment. Hogan is my all-time favorite golfer mainly because he's the only one I knew when I was a kid. I remember taking school field trips to the Hogan Company and Mr. Hogan was always extremely friendly to us kids, giving us wedges and balls.

 

Though I didn't grow up playing at Shady Oaks (the place Hogan called home for many years), many of my friends did. If he saw a kid struggling with something in his swing, he'd tell either the head pro or one of the assistants to go out and help the kid. Of course, he'd also let the pro know what he thought the kids problem might be.

 

He was a great man, though mis-understood by many, and I think it's extremely cool he's still so highly thought of almost 40 years since he last played a tournament.

 

Of course, as I type this message, I can look around my study at three different pictures of him.

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Thanks for the compliment. Hogan is my all-time favorite golfer mainly because he's the only one I knew when I was a kid. I remember taking school field trips to the Hogan Company and Mr. Hogan was always extremely friendly to us kids, giving us wedges and balls.

 

Though I didn't grow up playing at Shady Oaks (the place Hogan called home for many years), many of my friends did. If he saw a kid struggling with something in his swing, he'd tell either the head pro or one of the assistants to go out and help the kid. Of course, he'd also let the pro know what he thought the kids problem might be.

 

He was a great man, though mis-understood by many, and I think it's extremely cool he's still so highly thought of almost 40 years since he last played a tournament.

 

Of course, as I type this message, I can look around my study at three different pictures of him.

 

 

3 meetings with the man and got to see him hit balls once......probably the greatest thrill of my life......my entire golf shop and office is like your study......in honor of Mr. Hogan.......he was not only a great golfer, but, a great man imop.......and I couldn't agree more with your assessment regarding these "books" on his swing/secret.......turns my stomach........as do teachers who "use" his name to "market" themselves.......sorta' "sac-religious" imop....:cheesy:

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Thanks for the compliment. Hogan is my all-time favorite golfer mainly because he's the only one I knew when I was a kid. I remember taking school field trips to the Hogan Company and Mr. Hogan was always extremely friendly to us kids, giving us wedges and balls.

 

Though I didn't grow up playing at Shady Oaks (the place Hogan called home for many years), many of my friends did. If he saw a kid struggling with something in his swing, he'd tell either the head pro or one of the assistants to go out and help the kid. Of course, he'd also let the pro know what he thought the kids problem might be.

 

He was a great man, though mis-understood by many, and I think it's extremely cool he's still so highly thought of almost 40 years since he last played a tournament.

 

Of course, as I type this message, I can look around my study at three different pictures of him.

 

 

3 meetings with the man and got to see him hit balls once......probably the greatest thrill of my life......my entire golf shop and office is like your study......in honor of Mr. Hogan.......he was not only a great golfer, but, a great man imop.......and I couldn't agree more with your assessment regarding these "books" on his swing/secret.......turns my stomach........as do teachers who "use" his name to "market" themselves.......sorta' "sac-religious" imop....:cheesy:

 

 

I feel the same way you do, even though I know one of those authors pretty well. It's especially funny to me that these books have all come out since Mr. Hogan's passing. Seems that if I had a secret that I thought someone wanted me to share, I'd do it while they were alive but that's just me.

 

I'll always believe he was the greatest to ever play, no matter what stat's someone may bring up about others. The man was basically crippled in his prime and still worked his way back to near perfection. There will never be another golf story like Mr. Hogan's. Of course, he was part of a generation of people who's hard work will be benefitted for many generations to come.

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Thanks for the compliment. Hogan is my all-time favorite golfer mainly because he's the only one I knew when I was a kid. I remember taking school field trips to the Hogan Company and Mr. Hogan was always extremely friendly to us kids, giving us wedges and balls.

 

Though I didn't grow up playing at Shady Oaks (the place Hogan called home for many years), many of my friends did. If he saw a kid struggling with something in his swing, he'd tell either the head pro or one of the assistants to go out and help the kid. Of course, he'd also let the pro know what he thought the kids problem might be.

 

He was a great man, though mis-understood by many, and I think it's extremely cool he's still so highly thought of almost 40 years since he last played a tournament.

 

Of course, as I type this message, I can look around my study at three different pictures of him.

 

 

3 meetings with the man and got to see him hit balls once......probably the greatest thrill of my life......my entire golf shop and office is like your study......in honor of Mr. Hogan.......he was not only a great golfer, but, a great man imop.......and I couldn't agree more with your assessment regarding these "books" on his swing/secret.......turns my stomach........as do teachers who "use" his name to "market" themselves.......sorta' "sac-religious" imop....:cheesy:

 

You both are very lucky golfers to have made his acquaintance

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Thanks for the compliment. Hogan is my all-time favorite golfer mainly because he's the only one I knew when I was a kid. I remember taking school field trips to the Hogan Company and Mr. Hogan was always extremely friendly to us kids, giving us wedges and balls.

 

Though I didn't grow up playing at Shady Oaks (the place Hogan called home for many years), many of my friends did. If he saw a kid struggling with something in his swing, he'd tell either the head pro or one of the assistants to go out and help the kid. Of course, he'd also let the pro know what he thought the kids problem might be.

 

He was a great man, though mis-understood by many, and I think it's extremely cool he's still so highly thought of almost 40 years since he last played a tournament.

 

Of course, as I type this message, I can look around my study at three different pictures of him.

 

 

3 meetings with the man and got to see him hit balls once......probably the greatest thrill of my life......my entire golf shop and office is like your study......in honor of Mr. Hogan.......he was not only a great golfer, but, a great man imop.......and I couldn't agree more with your assessment regarding these "books" on his swing/secret.......turns my stomach........as do teachers who "use" his name to "market" themselves.......sorta' "sac-religious" imop....:cheesy:

 

You both are very lucky golfers to have made his acquaintance

 

 

I agree, though I'd go with Slicefixer being the luckier of the two. I knew little about golf when I met Mr. Hogan and really only knew him as the guy whose name was on my clubs, bag, and balls.

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  • 1 month later...

It is unfortunate that there are so many people out there that claim to have "Hogan's Secret", but the reason I finally came out with my book was to add to what Jody said in Afternoons with Mr Hogan, and to clarify some of Hogan's cryptic writings in Five Lessons.

I have been holding on to the information I received, while teaching with John Schlee, for about 20 yrs. John told Ben he wouldn't come out with anything that had to be acknowledged by him. Hogan told John to go and build a name for himself and not rely on the Hogan name for teaching.

Well, John got sick and both men died and by the year 2000 I had a job to do. I told John before he died I would come out with another book, (I helped him write the Maximum Golf book) I don't know if you are aware of how long it takes to get a book out in the traditional way, but mine finally comes out October 6, 2006. It's a tribute to John and Ben but now I want the world to know exactly what he told John handed down to me, like a grandfather would give the father and the father would give the son. I have the torch now and I'm passing all the info to anybody that's wants to learn.

Sure I'm going to make a buck, but I'm a teacher. I love to teach and I've got something to offer.

 

Thanks for the ear,

Tom Bertrand

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Congratulations to you Tom Bertrand on your upcoming book about Ben Hogan. I'm always interested in reading what other golf swing analysts have to say about a great golfer's swing. My only criticism is that I'm not fond of the title. As far as I'm concerned there is no secret to how Hogan swung a golf club, as I can plainly see what he his doing in still pictures and videos, plus the books he wrote. However, I guess it's hard to resist the temptation, in order to promote the book to it's fullest potential. At any rate, I'm sure it will prove to be a useful tool that the avid golfer can use to help him understand golf swing mechanics and, hopefully, acquire a satisfactory swing for himself. I look forward to reading what you have written.

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The funny thing guys, is that there is a secret. It really makes the golf swing simple. You can view it many times but you have to feel the difference in the movement. That is why my system is derived from slow swing motions to feel everything that goes into the swing. Not just when you are hitting a ball. You have to develop the motion before you attempt to hit a ball. The body has to know where it is going and what it expects from other parts of the body.

John told me Hogan would laugh at everybody who analyzed his swing and made mention of this motion or that. They would have pictures of Hogan with his right heel flat on the ground and say "Look, Hogan's hips were much quieter on the downswing then he said", but it was a photo of a short pitch shot.

Hogan told John what the swing needed, anybody's swing, but if he, John started copying Hogan's swing, John would no longer be welcome in his presence. You see, Ben couldn't even swing the way he wanted to swing since his accident, and he hated the comparisons and people copying his adjustments because of his physical handicap.

What I bring out is the way Hogan would have liked to swing the club if he wasn't hampered by his injuries from the bus accident. I am passing on what Hogan said about his own swing and not what someone thought Hogan meant.

For example, Hogan stated clearly 3 times in Five Lessons that he advocated the arms and wrists to be as close together as possible during the whole swing. Yet many teachers, including some of the top in today's world (Leadbetter and McLain) say, "Hogan didn't mean to keep the arms close." Hogan constantly said, "Read the books I wrote, I didn't put any baloney in there." Hogan couldn't put his own arms together at address because it was too painful, but he would bring them closer together with his initial movement on the backswing.

I could go on but I'll let you think a little about what I have written here. If you have more questions let me know. I'll try to answer them as quickly as possible.

 

Thanks,

Tom B.

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If you are having problems using the so called "weak grip " of Hogan's, then your hands are not going through the hitting area properly. Ater Hogan came out with his "Secret' in '55 and a number of professionals tried to use what he described and hit weak shots to the right, he was asked why. Hogan's reply was, "The simply aren't doing it correctly".

I have both v's of my hands pointing toward my left shoulder and I hook the ball. The hands shouldn't dictate where the clubhead goes, it's the body spin.

 

Tom B

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I do open the stance with the shorter irons, but on the woods and the longer irons I am square to the line.

As for the grip, I teach people to swing with there body first, guidance witharms second and the connection to the club last. If you swing properly with the body, like Hogan said, you willproduce a hook. The grip is what will allow you to modify direction.

 

Tom B.

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Tom, does your book cover everything from the full swing to pitching, chipping, ect ?

 

And you mentioned you will learn the feel the proper sequence of the swing.

 

I dont mean to play devils advocate, but why should i believe your book will be any different from previous

 

authors claming to have discovered Mr Hogans "secret" ?

 

I would love to purchase your book if it does what you say it will, which is to finally understand hogans

 

swing and to be able to apply it to my game.

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Tom,

I understand where you are coming from in relation to Hogan. I've studied the golf swing for very intently for over 36 years and someday I intend to publish my own findings. I, too, have a secret about the golf swing, which is something that does not appear in Hogan's book or TGM for that matter. From what I have seen, Hogan made many adjustments to his swing during his long career. In my opinion, the previous writings I have seen about Hogan's swing have been off the mark, so I'm looking forward to seeing your treatment, in hopes that it will be a bit more discerning. Glad to see you are making an effort to answer questions put forth on this forum. Very generous of you.

Lary

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Jeff,

 

Hogan's flexed left knee during and after impact wasn't to accomodate an injured knee. He felt a need to continue to be level through the impact area. Hogan tried to keep his left knee and leg from straightening, but as he got older it was harder and harder.Straightening the left knee for most good players actually happens after impact, especially Tiger. The problem is, most amateurs see that and try to copy it, but they straighten the left leg before impact raising their lower body and thin the shot or top it.

 

RWeeks,

 

The book focuses only on the swing, but many of the priciples can be applied to the short game as well.

The reason I can claim to know "Secrets" of Hogan is because they came directly from him. If you read the rest of my posts you will remember, Hogan handed the info down to Schlee and Schlee handed it down to me. Like a father to the son and then the son to his son. Too many well know teachers like Leadbetter and McLain have opinions of what Hogan wanted to accomplish in his swing, especially in Leadbetters book trying to explain the Hogan pictures used for Five Lessons. The words"I think" were used more than once.

My book will explain Hogan's "little twist" on the backswing with his hands, and what I termed "the missing link" to his secret that makes everything flow. I, like Hogan himself, believe that anyone with an average body can learn to swing the club properly and break 80, if they simply apply themselves to understanding the swing and practicing the motions before they learn to "capture" the ball on the clubface.

 

Powerpro-Lary

 

I'm glad you think the other writings about Hogan to be 'off the mark'. Hogan didn't want to swing the way he did. He did what he had to do in order to take a mangled body and make it work. Maybe one of these days I will read your book and say "Yes, finally someone else understands Hogan the way I do."

I've been finished with the book for well over a year now and I'm ready to start fielding some questions. So this forum gives me a good head start for the months to come.

 

Thanks guys

Tom B.

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Tom-

 

Thanks for the reply. A couple other questions.

 

Jim Hardy has based his one-plane swing model to a great extent on Hogan's swing (like Schlee, Hardy was privleged to discuss the swing with Hogan). If you are familiar with Jim's model, how does it compare to what John passed along to you?

 

One thing Hardy points out is that Hogan increases his spine angle throughout the swing until impact. Was Hogan aware of this, and, if so, why did he do it, as opposed to just adopting a more bent over posture at address?

 

In Gardner Dickinson's wonderful book "Let 'er Rip", he descibes the lateral slide of the tailbone toward the target as the worst feature of Hogan's swing, and that Hogan had to build in compensations to prevent hooking. Would Hogan have agreed with this assessment or did he feel that the lateral slide was advantageous in some way?

 

Thanks again!

 

Jeff

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Jeff,

As far Jim Hardy's book,I haven't had the opportunity to read it only the excerpt in Golf Digest, and it didn't really interest me. I'm not a fan of the 2-plane swing. I feel it is a manufactured lift on the backswing and an unnecessary move people make to increase the backswing. Professionals have been successful with the 2-plane, but I believe they tend to be on some of the time, but off a lot of the time. They need to be great putters to score well consistently.

As far as the spine angle, Hogan encouraged John Schlee to be at one altitude throughout the swing until the finish, but Hogan himself couldn't set-up that way because of his legs. To much pressure at address, so the angle changed. If you can eliminate the up down movement from address it will make for more consistent contact.

I agree with Tungsten 33 about different body types dictating the spine angle because some people are long legged and some are long waisted. The primary factor is the left arm (in a fight handed swing), must be level with the shoulders on the backswing. As Hogan put it, "the left arm goes across the chest".

I agree again with Tungsten 33 on the slide question. I read Dickinson's book and I remember him talking about Hogan sliding and wondered what he was looking at. I also remember him saying Hogan was hitting these weak slices to the right when he was observing him on the range. I'm not fond of what Dicinson remembered.

So to answer your question, Hogan knew the body needed to move laterally in the impact area, but as little as possible. Ballard's "up against the wall" movement on the backswing would send chills up my spine every time I heard that phrase. Remember, Hogan always wanted to retain the angle of the right leg going back. Zero lateral movement on the backswing.

 

I guess I better check Slicerfix's posts.

 

Remember guys, I'm not teaching Hogan's swing. I teach what Hogan wanted people to understand about the swing. He told Schlee, who took private lessons from him for 5 years, "The minute you start copying my swing you're out'a here. Why would you want to learn to swing like a cripple?"

 

Later,

Tom B

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Thanks again, Tom. Very generous of you to so freely share your information.

 

As far as Hardy goes, I'm a big fan of his and am very curious to see how close the two of you ultimately are. Don't bother with the book, though. Jim speaks much better than John Andrisani writes, and he presents his thoughts more fully and with a lot more clarity in his dvd set. Best of all, if you don't like the dvd set, you can send it back for a full refund!

 

Coming back to Dickinson, though he doesn't quite come out and say it, it seemed that he really didn't learn that much from Hogan and became more of a Snead disciple as he got older. Never stopped wearing the cap, though, and he did name one of his son's "Ben".

 

On Ballard, ever hear of Casey Eberting? He teaches in San Antonio and a couple of times a year in your hometown; his site is www.cegolf.com. According to him, he was a Ballard assistant and eventually figured out that, even though Ballard made constant references to Hogan's swing, what Ballard was teaching was actually quite different. He then embarked on his own odyssey to solve the riddle of Hogan's swing and now believes he has done so. Too bad he was studying the swing of a cripple!

 

Best,

 

Jeff

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That's true. I'm sure if I talked to Hardy about Hogan's swing and what Ben informed him about, I would probably be more interested.

As far as Casey goes, I did email him not so long ago about meeting up with him when he does his San Diego gig but he said he would be too busy with his family.

The 'world class move' that Schlee talked about is better explained in my book. John talked about pulling down and in with the thumb and index finger of the right hand on the downswing, but failed to mention how to relax the hands and wrists to get the bow in the back of the left wrist for the proper position at impact. Maybe he was afraid of repercussions from the Hogan camp at the time.

 

I know Hogan was constantly tweeking his clubs, but a lot of pros were at the time. Ijust don't know how much influence it had on his swing adjustments.

 

Hey guys, I need your help. I've been in email contact with Peter Morris, the instruction editor, at Golf Digest. I sent him a preview copy to try and get a book excerpt in the November issue (since it comes out in the beginning of October). I have his email if any or all of you want to try and push to get me in by sending him a note. It's [email protected]

 

Thanks,

Tom B

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I believe I will purchase the book simply out of curiousity (when is it being released?), but I am a little hesitant to implement Ben Hogan's principles after the lack of success I had following along with his 'Five Fundamentals' book.

 

I purchased David Leadbetter's follow up book 'Fundamentals of Hogan', partially because I wanted to find out Ben Hogan's "secret" and view the previously unavailable photos. Unfortunately, David Leadbetter seemed to focus more on his own principles and did not provide any additional insight into Ben Hogan's.

 

I still don't know what the "secret" is/was (as I haven't reached that part in David Leadbetter's book), but believe that it has something to do with rotating the forearms/wrists clockwise (i.e. opening the clubface) on the backswing, and rotating the forearms/wrists counter-clockwise (i.e. closing the clubface back to square) on the downswing. Is this correct?

 

My main fascination is Ben Hogan's ability to be so consistant. I feel that I am a good ball striker, but my inconsistant swing is going to get me nowhere. Like Ben Hogan, I would like to 'own' my swing and understand how/why it works and/or doesn't work.

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I was interested in purchasing Jim Hardy's DVDs, but their website does not allow international shipping and I do not know of any other websites that sell the DVDs.

 

I am getting pretty desperate at this stage. I have read so many books, watched so many DVDs, taken countless amounts of lessons and none of them seem to be solving my inconsistancy problems. On one hand the books/videos aren't personalised, and on the other hand the lessons don't seem to be addressing the problems directly.

 

I have a good work ethic, most days I will be out on the golf course for upwards of six hours practicing/playing, but if I am practicing the wrong fundamentals and don't understand why I am hitting bad shots, then my progress is going to be minimal.

 

Sorry to take the thread off topic.

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Ducky,

 

First, there is a 'secret' and yes it has to do do with the hands and arms, but other factors are involved, namely the lower body. Hogan was so adamant about the lower body and 'chain action' that he got irritated with the average golfer who wanted to hear about pronation and supination without addressing the need for the lower body to initiate the downswing. And I mean initiate. Most golfers when they try to start with the lower body actually start with the upper and lower together. There has to be a distinct separation between the two. If you do not have the proper lower body motion, what you do with the hands and arms is meaningless.

And as far as the clubface opening on the backswing, it is a reaction from coiling or employing Hogan's 'little twist' and I believe everyone needs to do it. The hands need a function on the backswing. Hogan gave them a specific function. If done correctly........... it's night and day for solid golf shots. The reason he said it wouldn't help the average golfer in his '55 life magazine article was because he didn't want Joe Blow thinking that was the only answer to a great swing. And if your shots are going right as Tungsten's did, then in Hogan's own words, when he was asked why professionals who tried his 'secret' and it didn't work, "Let's just say they weren't doing it correctly".

Now Ducky, I don't know what your swing is like but if you have specific questions fire away.

 

Tom B

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Ducky-

 

The Hardy DVD is the best out there but I think you'd still need a Hardy-trained instructor to help make the switch. Some of the moves need to be done precisely right.

 

As far as trying to learn from Hogan's "Five Lessons" and Leadbetter's take on it, forget it. Lead doesn't have a clue about what Hogan was doing and essentially uses the book to promote his theories of that time (since they're constantly changing). On top of that, there are some major mistakes in "Five Lessons" that only a few people really understand (Hardy is one of them) that will really screw you up, like leading the downswing with the left elbow and initiating the downswing with just the hips.

 

Australia has produced some really great ballstrikers in recent years, many that follow some or most of Hardy's one-plane mechanics, so there must be good instruction available "down under". Hope you can find some!

 

Jeff

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      Davis Lamb - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue (KFT)
      Brenden Jelley - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue (KFT)
      Dillion Board - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue (KFT)
      John Augenstein - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      Yi Cao - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      Kris Ventura - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      Mark Goetz - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      Nelson Ledesma - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      Morgan Hoffmann - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      Tanner Gore - WITB - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
       
       
       
       
       
      Pullout Albums
       
      Ryan Gerard's custom & 1 off Cameron putters - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
      L.A.B. Golf custom Mezz 1 - 2024 The Ascendant presented by Blue
       
       
       
       
       
       
        • Like
      • 7 replies
    • 2024 ISCO Championship - Discussion and Links to Photos
      Please put any questions or comments here
       
       
       
       
      General Albums
       
      2024 ISCO Championship - Monday #1
      2024 ISCO Championship - Monday #2
       
       
       
       
      WITB Albums
       
      James Nicholas - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Marcus Kinhult - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Adrien Saddier - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Stephen Stallings, Jr. - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Espen Kofstad - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Daniel Iceman - Kentucky PGA Section Champ - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Cooper Musselman - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Alex Goff - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Angel Hidalgo - WITB - 2024 ISCO Championship
       
       
       
       
      Pullout Albums
       
      Kevin Streelman's custom Cameron putter - 2024 ISCO Championship
      Cameron putter - 2024 ISCO Championship
       
       
       
       
       
       
      • 3 replies
    • 2024 John Deere Classic - Discussion and Links to Photos
      Please put any questions or comments here
       
       
       
      General Albums
       
      2024 John Deere Classic - Monday #1
      2024 John Deere Classic - Monday #2
      2024 John Deere Classic - Tuesday #1
      2024 John Deere Classic - Tuesday #2
      2024 John Deere Classic - Tuesday #3
      2024 John Deere Classic - Tuesday #4
       
       
       
       
       
      WITB Albums
       
      Jason Day - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Josh Teater - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Michael Thorbjornsen - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Austin Smotherman - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Joseph Bramlett - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      C.T. Pan - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Anders Albertson - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Seung Yul Noh - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Blake Hathcoat - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Jimmy Stanger - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Cole Sherwood - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Anders Larson - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Bill Haas - WITB - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Tommy "2 Gloves" Gainey WITB – 2024 John Deere Classic
       
      Pullout Albums
       
      Garrick Higgo - 2 Aretera shafts in the bag - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Jhonattan Vegas' custom Cameron putter - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Bud Cauley's custom Cameron putter - 2024 John Deere Classic
      2 new Super Stroke Marvel comics grips - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Swag blade putter - 2024 John Deere Classic
      Swag Golf - Joe Dirt covers - 2024 John Deere Classic
       
       
       
       
       
      • 3 replies

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