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More old than classic

badgermatbadgermat Members Posts: 82 ✭✭✭
edited Jan 5, 2017 in Classic Golf And Golfers #1
Okay, I know these are pretty far from "classic" clubs, but can anyone help me out with some information about these MacGregor MX mid-size irons?



Particularly their age (I'm guessing late 90s), any idea of where they sat in MacGregor's range, and what the lofts might be?



They cost me bugger-all so I wasn't expecting much, but they're actually quite nice to play. Not modern at all, but not quite old-school either.



Anyway, not really up to the standard here, but any information gratefully received image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />



bm

Comments

  • justasgoodjustasgood Without Tempo, you are just a hacker. Members Posts: 2,740 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Can't unsee that😜
  • WrigglesWriggles Members Posts: 3,264 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Have no idea. Nice clubs, though



    I'd clean them up, and enjoy.
  • Par-net-birdiePar-net-birdie Members Posts: 241
    +1 wriggles

    Clean em up and go get them dirty

    So many cast aways that are totally playable

    That you can buy for a song

    go hit them and come back and tell of your

    Experience with them

  • CarpCarp Members Posts: 47
    It's funny, those are soooo similar to a set I have called Spalding Legacy. I have looked a few times but I can't seem to find any information on them either. They play pretty nicely, though. The cavities on mine look a just a little more like Eye 2s.
    jus chillin
  • ShallowfaceShallowface Members Posts: 1,481 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Carp wrote:


    It's funny, those are soooo similar to a set I have called Spalding Legacy. I have looked a few times but I can't seem to find any information on them either. They play pretty nicely, though. The cavities on mine look a just a little more like Eye 2s.




    If you can post a picture, someone here may have some info on them. Spalding sold a number of models branded Legacy over the years. Callaway continues to use that name on clubs sold outside the USA. Henrik Stenson's Callaway irons are a Legacy model.
  • CarpCarp Members Posts: 47
    Thanks for the info. Didn't know that about Callaway. I'll try to get a photo up. I played with them today and noticed they are actually called 'Legacy Gold'. Did a google search to try and swipe a photo but there was nothing remotely similar. I'm usually pretty good at finding photos, too. I mentioned they look really close to Eye 2s...oddly, while I was searching I came across a set called 'Spalding Eclipse' which look a lot like Ping Zings.
    jus chillin
  • ShallowfaceShallowface Members Posts: 1,481 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jan 12, 2017 #8
    Carp wrote:


    Thanks for the info. Didn't know that about Callaway. I'll try to get a photo up. I played with them today and noticed they are actually called 'Legacy Gold'. Did a google search to try and swipe a photo but there was nothing remotely similar. I'm usually pretty good at finding photos, too. I mentioned they look really close to Eye 2s...oddly, while I was searching I came across a set called 'Spalding Eclipse' which look a lot like Ping Zings.




    Back in the day when component clubmaking was popular and companies offered a number of clone clubheads, those companies (and on a larger scale, the foundries themselves) offered what were called "open stock" clubheads. They would take a clubhead that they were already making and put your brand and model name on it, and companies such as Spalding and Wilson that were doing a lot of store line business took advantage of that option. Companies that have been in the business a long time have a long list of trademarks they can use and they recycle them freely.



    The original Spalding Legacy iron was their 100th anniversary Top-Flite iron in 1976, which was a remake of the 1953 Top Flite iron. But after that the name was used on less expensive cluibs and balls, and was even used on a Golfsmith component iron when Golfsmith was selling Spalding branded components in the 90s after Spalding started marketing most of their golf business under the Top Flite brand. When Callaway acquired Spalding's golf business, that list of trademarks (intellectual property) came along with it. Apex, from Spading's ownership of Ben Hogan, is one example. And Legacy is another, which they have chosen to use on products sold outside the USA.



    Wilson did something similar with labels such as 1200 and X-31. Originally those were top of the line offerings. In later years, the names were used on box sets.



    Callaway's newest driver is called the Epic. Could be another recycled Spalding label, as there were a number of clubs produced by Spalding called Spalding Epic over the years. Next year's model could be called the Callaway GBB Elite. Callaway GBB Executive doesn't have much of a ring to it.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • CarpCarp Members Posts: 47
    Wow. Great info!



    It's been interesting to see Spalding, Wilson and other companies progress (and regress) over the years. Didn't realize there was a relationship at some point with Callaway and Spalding. Interestingly, to me anyway, the sporting goods store I work for used to use the name Golfmate for its products. After ownership changed several years ago, they dropped the Golfmate line and made a deal with Wilson to brand the same products under the Wilson Ultra brand. Hate to see an established brand come to that since it's mostly cheap equipment and accesories, even though I have always known 'Ultra' stuff to be pretty entry-level.



    I included a picture of a 'Legacy Gold' iron with the Spalding brand. I could definitely see these being component clubs from the period you mentioned.



    16144519_994084607402716_1239513710_n.jpg?oh=72d62f46aea125b74e50d9dbe62ccec9&oe=587F75D9
    jus chillin
  • ShallowfaceShallowface Members Posts: 1,481 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Jan 17, 2017 #10
    Carp wrote:


    Wow. Great info!



    It's been interesting to see Spalding, Wilson and other companies progress (and regress) over the years. Didn't realize there was a relationship at some point with Callaway and Spalding. Interestingly, to me anyway, the sporting goods store I work for used to use the name Golfmate for its products. After ownership changed several years ago, they dropped the Golfmate line and made a deal with Wilson to brand the same products under the Wilson Ultra brand. Hate to see an established brand come to that since it's mostly cheap equipment and accesories, even though I have always known 'Ultra' stuff to be pretty entry-level.



    I included a picture of a 'Legacy Gold' iron with the Spalding brand. I could definitely see these being component clubs from the period you mentioned.



    16144519_994084607402716_1239513710_n.jpg?oh=72d62f46aea125b74e50d9dbe62ccec9&oe=587F75D9




    I haven't seen this particular model before, but yes it is a store line club and an "open stock" head that Spalding had branded with a trademark they already owned. That said, they probably play just fine. Just because a club has that sort of origin doesn't make it a bad club. In fact, the story is that the original King Cobra Oversize iron was another open stock clubhead, and that club was highly regarded and very successful.



    Re: Wilson and Ultra. Wilson owned the Ultra trademark from its ownership of the Walter Hagen company (Haig ULTRA). After a run on pro line 2-piece balls, it's now being used on lower end balls and box sets.



    The fact that Wilson, or anyone else for that matter, offers store line equipment shouldn't reduce the reputation of the brand in anyone's eyes. Wilson has ALWAYS offered store line equipment alongside its pro line offerings going back to the very beginnings of its history. Also, Wilson is a full line sporting goods company that sells all manner of product at all levels of retail. To expect them not to have golf equipment in department stores alongside the tennis, football, basketball and baseball gear is unrealistic. The key is for them to help the customer make the distinction by maintaining a high profile in the pro line world. They do a good job of that on their website by having separate sections for, as they refer to it, "Recreational" products versus Staff products.
  • CarpCarp Members Posts: 47
    Yeah, they seem to play pretty well. I hate that it makes me want to get a set of Eye 2s so that I can see just how well. Prolly do that at some point being the club ho that I am.



    I remember Haig Ultra. Didn't know that's where Wilson got it from though. And we have Wilson stuff throughout our store, tennis, football, basketball, etc. as well as golf, geared both toward recreational and better players. I suppose my concern is more sentimental and solely related to their golf brand, especially Wilson Staff, as I've seen it decline in popularity over the years. But hey, I've seen that with Spalding too, not to mention Hogan, Walter Hagen and a host of others.



    One thing that is really cool about Wilson, though, is how innovative they have been. Not only in golf, but in so many different sports. Interesting how some of the recent TM irons have the Reflex style slot. Also everything that led to the Triton driver, just to mention a couple. Not all of their innovations pan out, but they have never been reluctant to put em out there. We've all benefited from that.
    jus chillin
  • El_RatadorEl_Ratador Members Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Similar question: I have a lefty set of the MacGregor MX Tour Oversize 3-Pw. A little snazzier looking than those MXs but presumably made around the same time. Something ablut them works perfect for my game - actually "downgraded" from a set of Nike VR-S irons (the cast cavity back version) and my ball-striking improved massively.



    But I can't find ANY info about these wrenches anywhere. No specs, no year of production, nada. I'd love to know as much as possible. Any info would be greatly appreciated.



    Link to a pic of my 7i: http://imgur.com/sOWeQeV
  • James the Hogan FanJames the Hogan Fan Members Posts: 679 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Carp wrote:


    Thanks for the info. Didn't know that about Callaway. I'll try to get a photo up. I played with them today and noticed they are actually called 'Legacy Gold'. Did a google search to try and swipe a photo but there was nothing remotely similar. I'm usually pretty good at finding photos, too. I mentioned they look really close to Eye 2s...oddly, while I was searching I came across a set called 'Spalding Eclipse' which look a lot like Ping Zings.




    Back in the day when component clubmaking was popular and companies offered a number of clone clubheads, those companies (and on a larger scale, the foundries themselves) offered what were called "open stock" clubheads. They would take a clubhead that they were already making and put your brand and model name on it, and companies such as Spalding and Wilson that were doing a lot of store line business took advantage of that option. Companies that have been in the business a long time have a long list of trademarks they can use and they recycle them freely.



    The original Spalding Legacy iron was their 100th anniversary Top-Flite iron in 1976, which was a remake of the 1953 Top Flite iron. But after that the name was used on less expensive cluibs and balls, and was even used on a Golfsmith component iron when Golfsmith was selling Spalding branded components in the 90s after Spalding started marketing most of their golf business under the Top Flite brand. When Callaway acquired Spalding's golf business, that list of trademarks (intellectual property) came along with it. Apex, from Spading's ownership of Ben Hogan, is one example. And Legacy is another, which they have chosen to use on products sold outside the USA.



    Wilson did something similar with labels such as 1200 and X-31. Originally those were top of the line offerings. In later years, the names were used on box sets.



    Callaway's newest driver is called the Epic. Could be another recycled Spalding label, as there were a number of clubs produced by Spalding called Spalding Epic over the years. Next year's model could be called the Callaway GBB Elite. Callaway GBB Executive doesn't have much of a ring to it.




    Interesting you bring up the Hogan thing with Callaway, I read an article about new-Hogan and someone there was lamenting that Callaway would not part with Apex but they managed to get everything elseish. Callaway has a line of wedges called ”sure-out” I imagine that’s a retained Hogan name as well.



    It would be interesting to see who owns what in the word of old golf trademarks... ”Kro-Flite”, ”Exploder”, ”VIP”, ”Citation” and so on. Somebody has to...
    Golfing in Finland!
    Wilson D300
    W/S Fybrid 3W
    W/S Fybrid 5W
    Hogan Apex 2003 (3-E)
    Mizuno 56
    Maxfli Revolution 60
    Macgregor Jackie Pung Putter #10

  • ShallowfaceShallowface Members Posts: 1,481 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Feb 12, 2019 3:48pm #14


    Carp wrote:


    Thanks for the info. Didn't know that about Callaway. I'll try to get a photo up. I played with them today and noticed they are actually called 'Legacy Gold'. Did a google search to try and swipe a photo but there was nothing remotely similar. I'm usually pretty good at finding photos, too. I mentioned they look really close to Eye 2s...oddly, while I was searching I came across a set called 'Spalding Eclipse' which look a lot like Ping Zings.




    Back in the day when component clubmaking was popular and companies offered a number of clone clubheads, those companies (and on a larger scale, the foundries themselves) offered what were called "open stock" clubheads. They would take a clubhead that they were already making and put your brand and model name on it, and companies such as Spalding and Wilson that were doing a lot of store line business took advantage of that option. Companies that have been in the business a long time have a long list of trademarks they can use and they recycle them freely.



    The original Spalding Legacy iron was their 100th anniversary Top-Flite iron in 1976, which was a remake of the 1953 Top Flite iron. But after that the name was used on less expensive cluibs and balls, and was even used on a Golfsmith component iron when Golfsmith was selling Spalding branded components in the 90s after Spalding started marketing most of their golf business under the Top Flite brand. When Callaway acquired Spalding's golf business, that list of trademarks (intellectual property) came along with it. Apex, from Spading's ownership of Ben Hogan, is one example. And Legacy is another, which they have chosen to use on products sold outside the USA.



    Wilson did something similar with labels such as 1200 and X-31. Originally those were top of the line offerings. In later years, the names were used on box sets.



    Callaway's newest driver is called the Epic. Could be another recycled Spalding label, as there were a number of clubs produced by Spalding called Spalding Epic over the years. Next year's model could be called the Callaway GBB Elite. Callaway GBB Executive doesn't have much of a ring to it.




    Interesting you bring up the Hogan thing with Callaway, I read an article about new-Hogan and someone there was lamenting that Callaway would not part with Apex but they managed to get everything elseish. Callaway has a line of wedges called "sure-out" I imagine that's a retained Hogan name as well.



    It would be interesting to see who owns what in the word of old golf trademarks... "Kro-Flite", "Exploder", "VIP", "Citation" and so on. Somebody has to...




    Sometimes it depends on what part of the world the products are being offered. I believe it was someone on this site that posted pictures of a set of Northwestern irons with the "Kro-Flite" name. Don't know if Spalding had allowed that trademark to lapse sometime in the past, or if that was a Northwestern set from some part of the world other than the USA. While Northwestern has ceased to exist as an entity in the USA, there are still Northwestern branded products available in Europe.



    i notice Callaway is selling a ball called the "Strata Eagle." When they sold the Top-Flite brand to Dick's Sporting Goods they turned around and started marketing their less expensive balls and box sets that had been carrying the Top-Flite name under the Strata name, which was an old Spalding brand. Seeing that Strata Eagle ball set off a wave of nostalgia in me as the Spalding Eagle was one of the first balls I can remember playing as a kid in the 1970s.



    Regarding old MacGregor trademarks, I would have to believe Dick's owns the rights to them through their acquisition of Golfsmith, who was the last company to own that brand and market products with it. As far as I know, Dick's has yet to use it. There is a MacGregor company in Japan that is still active and was separate from the US version.



    The Hireko component company is marketing clubs under the Powerbilt Citation and TPS labels. They also offer products branded Orlimar. I don't know if they own the Powerbilt brand or if they are licensing it from someone. The baseball side of the old H&B company, Louisville Slugger, is owned by Wilson these days.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • WrigglesWriggles Members Posts: 3,264 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I recall seeing a set of new Legacy Gold irons at a golf store in Youngstown, OH around 1988. Thought they were really beautiful. Looked for a set in a local store where I lived, and was told, they were a special issue, only sold in certain chains of golf stores.



    Bought a set of Pal Joeys, instead. Nice cavity backs, like 845's or Pings. Wish I still had them.

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