Living on the golf course – concern about pesticides/chemicals?

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  • Thug HunterThug Hunter Members Posts: 2,615 ✭✭
    edited Oct 28, 2014 #32
    dmblanch wrote:


    You appear to live on the first hole of your country club. I've found which one it is, but I won't name it here. It's a 400 yard par 4 from the blue tees, so good drives are supposed to land between those two sandtraps. Bad drives can reach your house. Drives can go 300 yards or 900 feet. They can break windshields or knock you unconscious.



    What's worse is that you live on the first hole. Nobody is warmed up yet and their drives will be even more erratic than usual. If they lose the first or second attempt, they'll put down a third.



    You may be thinking about this home as a serene country oasis with green space. At night, it will be peaceful. During the day, starting early every morning, expect to have uninvited guests rooting around, mixed with surprising CLUNKS on the roof every so often. Some knuckleheads will try to hop the fence, many will try to fish balls over the fence with ball retrievers.



    Find a driving range and watch people hit for a half an hour sometime. Note how little they can control where their shots go. You may decide this house is not for you.




    I have played the course and found the house. It is indeed the first hole and it's 405 from the men's tees and further form the tips. The bunker on the left side of the fairway is only 226 and 253 to carry from the white tees. So with those numbers it's definitely in range of tee shots as the fence is right off the fairway and only about 50 yards left and slightly behind the bunker's distance. Here's two photos taken from the backyard:

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  • dmblanchdmblanch cranky duffer Members Posts: 757

    dmblanch wrote:


    You appear to live on the first hole of your country club. I've found which one it is, but I won't name it here. It's a 400 yard par 4 from the blue tees, so good drives are supposed to land between those two sandtraps. Bad drives can reach your house. Drives can go 300 yards or 900 feet. They can break windshields or knock you unconscious.



    What's worse is that you live on the first hole. Nobody is warmed up yet and their drives will be even more erratic than usual. If they lose the first or second attempt, they'll put down a third.



    You may be thinking about this home as a serene country oasis with green space. At night, it will be peaceful. During the day, starting early every morning, expect to have uninvited guests rooting around, mixed with surprising CLUNKS on the roof every so often. Some knuckleheads will try to hop the fence, many will try to fish balls over the fence with ball retrievers.



    Find a driving range and watch people hit for a half an hour sometime. Note how little they can control where their shots go. You may decide this house is not for you.




    I have played the course and found the house. It is indeed the first hole and it's 405 from the men's tees and further form the tips. The bunker on the left side of the fairway is only 226 and 253 to carry from the white tees. So with those numbers it's definitely in range of tee shots as the fence is right off the fairway and only about 50 yards left and slightly behind the bunker's distance. Here's two photos taken from the backyard:





    Wow, I merely did a google search, you drove to the actual house! Does the angle of the house to tee get screened by the neighbors house? Meaning, do the neighbors shield the house from direct flight impacts? If so, that's not as bad as having balls land in your big open backyard. I'd love the latter, but hate the former. Your kid could resell found balls over the back fence.
  • dmagalhaesdmagalhaes Members Posts: 750 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I would be willing to bet that the food we eat and the water we drink contain more "toxins" than the air surrounding my golf course...
  • Thug HunterThug Hunter Members Posts: 2,615 ✭✭
    edited Oct 28, 2014 #35
    dmblanch wrote:


    dmblanch wrote:


    You appear to live on the first hole of your country club. I've found which one it is, but I won't name it here. It's a 400 yard par 4 from the blue tees, so good drives are supposed to land between those two sandtraps. Bad drives can reach your house. Drives can go 300 yards or 900 feet. They can break windshields or knock you unconscious.



    What's worse is that you live on the first hole. Nobody is warmed up yet and their drives will be even more erratic than usual. If they lose the first or second attempt, they'll put down a third.



    You may be thinking about this home as a serene country oasis with green space. At night, it will be peaceful. During the day, starting early every morning, expect to have uninvited guests rooting around, mixed with surprising CLUNKS on the roof every so often. Some knuckleheads will try to hop the fence, many will try to fish balls over the fence with ball retrievers.



    Find a driving range and watch people hit for a half an hour sometime. Note how little they can control where their shots go. You may decide this house is not for you.




    I have played the course and found the house. It is indeed the first hole and it's 405 from the men's tees and further form the tips. The bunker on the left side of the fairway is only 226 and 253 to carry from the white tees. So with those numbers it's definitely in range of tee shots as the fence is right off the fairway and only about 50 yards left and slightly behind the bunker's distance. Here's two photos taken from the backyard:





    Wow, I merely did a google search, you drove to the actual house! Does the angle of the house to tee get screened by the neighbors house? Meaning, do the neighbors shield the house from direct flight impacts? If so, that's not as bad as having balls land in your big open backyard. I'd love the latter, but hate the former. Your kid could resell found balls over the back fence.




    Wasn't hard to find, my brother in law is a member of the management company at this course. I know the Dallas area pretty well too. With that and good ole realtor.com, it's that easy to find photos. The neighbors house screens it a little bit, but how good just depends on how bad the hook or pull is. The house has siding that could easily be damaged and plenty of exposed windows as well.
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  • dmblanchdmblanch cranky duffer Members Posts: 757
    Here's what will happen fairly regularly. Some pseudo-big dogs are gonna say, "That left bunker is only 226 to carry, I can get over that and cut the corner." So they line left and snap it further left. I wonder if they replaced the siding before they put the house up for sale to hide the dings.
  • tatertottatertot Members Posts: 4,592 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    dmagalhaes wrote:


    I would be willing to bet that the food we eat and the water we drink contain more "toxins" than the air surrounding my golf course...




    Really? have you ever seen what they spray on most courses? I'm far from a knee jerk hypochondriac, but you do have to be realistic.
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  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    tatertot wrote:

    dmagalhaes wrote:


    I would be willing to bet that the food we eat and the water we drink contain more "toxins" than the air surrounding my golf course...




    Really? have you ever seen what they spray on most courses? I'm far from a knee jerk hypochondriac, but you do have to be realistic.


    dmag is probably right under normal conditions, but, it's just foolishness to think this while they are fertilizing.
  • 2bGood2bGood Members Posts: 5,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I think you have heard plenty of good advice from the folks here. I golf allot and always said I would never live on most lots of a golf course for few reasons.



    1. Noise early every morning as the cutters and equipment comes out (you are on hole #1 so you deal with this the earliest.)

    2. No privacy during the day (you will have people looking into your back yard all day long, and the odd jerk will even climb your fence) good news is you are early enough in the round that you wont have some jerk peeing in your area

    3. "unhappy" people saying "unhappy" things loudly. Here is were being on the first hole as the hot heads are usually able to keep their temper for a few holes

    4. Balls coming into my yard. (your not in the worst spot for this, but you are in range and will some action)



    As for the chemical thing, I can't help much.
  • mwmgolfxmwmgolfx Members Posts: 453 ✭✭✭✭
    I've been living on a Course for over 12 years now. There are a few homes that have been hit and are at risk. But my place has never once been hit in the entire time I've been there. And I find maybe 1-2 balls a year now in the back yard.



    The houses that get hit are about 200-220 out from the tee and on the right side of the fairway. Almost none at that distance on the left (could be that most people slice, eh?). My property is right on the green on the left. And the house is well over 125 yards (maybe closer to 150) to the left of the green. For an approach shot to the green means to hit the house, one would have to pull a 100-200 yard shot 100-150 yards to the left. Not likely.



    This was a major consideration in what lot I bought when I had my place built. Houses on Par-3s on the right and most fairway homes 100-250 on the right of the hole tend to get hit or get balls in the lawn. This is just a characteristic of most golfers.



    Pesticides have never been a consideration for my place. I've watched them a number of times apply the stuff to the course and never seen or even smelled it in my yard ever. Maybe if there no rough/setback from the course, in other words, the house/yard right next to the main-fairway with a smallish rough, it might be an issue. But nobody I've talked to has ever mentioned it either. And we have about 800 homes and 36 holes so if it were any type of issue, someone would have mentioned it. They do mention golf balls once in a while. But nothing else.
  • jbljbl Members Posts: 119 ✭✭✭
    Your concern about the pesticide/fertilizer issue is really unfounded. The industry is so over-regulated and courses watch every penny, that stuff is expensive! Remember that every Joe homeowner can buy the same stuff at Home Depot and apply it to their yard with reckless abandon; if the package says to use 10 oz., then 20 must be better, right? Nice neighborhoods where everyone must have a perfect yard are swimming in more chemicals/fertilizers than any golf course. I'm a third generation superintendent just so you know my perspective. On a side note, I live on my golf course but would never do it again if it weren't for work. Having people basically in your yard all day every day is really annoying.
  • nuthin but a hackernuthin but a hacker Certified Hacker Members Posts: 2,561 ✭✭


    Thank you all for the helpful suggestions!



    My concern with balls landing in the backyard is with regards to potential for injury - is that an issue? I am not sure how heavy a ball is and what risk it poses at the speed it is traveling? Rare to occasional damage to the property I may be able to live with, depending on how much overall it will cost me per year.



    Pardon my naivete, but where exactly is the tee box here? If it is where the 2 cart paths meet to form sort of an apex of a triangle on the left, Google Maps tells me the home sits more than 500 feet to the right from it.




    One course I play has several homes that have a net over the entire back yard to catch stray balls. I've always seen several golf balls in the net.
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  • vernonvernon Hi! I'm Holly! Members Posts: 1,194 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I live a hundred yards from the green on the right side of a par 5. Been here five years and love it even though I rarely play the course and am a member elsewhere. My yard and house catch balls constantly from people trying to reach the green in two. If the wind is out of the south (into the golfers face) I'll get 8 - 10 balls on an average weekend day. House probably gets hit 20 - 25 times per year. My brother lives up the street on a par 4 and he's truly in "kill" zone. About 200 - 230 from the white tees (where most of the slicers play) and about 50 yards to the right. He's replaced three windows this year alone. Pisses him off but I really don't complain as the golf course was here before I was and as a 40 year participant in the game, I knew the risks coming in. Doesn't bother me in the least.



    I have a sign in my backyard welcoming golfers to enter to find their balls but asking them to please not play out of the yard. Even though my yard is 10 yards beyond OB, people still hit em' if they like the lie! As for chemicals, I apply WAY more stuff to my lawn than the golf course ever would over the course of a year. Nonetheless, just from the sounds of your concerns, I sincerely doubt you would be happy in a golf course environment. You have to be pretty laid back or you'll find yourself becoming upset for one reason or another on a daily basis. Every time you see the maintenance crew applying product, you'll be wondering what it is and if you made a mistake. Every time you find a ball in your yard you'll wonder what if your son had been out there. And, it can get pretty noisy if the club hosts many charity tournaments. Lot's of drunks and people who have little experience in golf course etiquette.



    As I said, I love it. My brother on the other hand wishes he would have built elsewhere. Good luck!
  • mr_divotsmr_divots Members Posts: 8,297 ✭✭
    I can't stand the Chemlawn that is applied to residential yards. The smell travels a long distance and I am highly averse to it. Funny enough, I never get any reactions when out on a golf course. I never pick up on the "smell" like the residential applications. Your first inquiry to the HOA, if I may, should be if they use these Chemlawn fertilizers on the homes' lawns. I could never live in say a townhome community where they routinely apply that stuff to everyone's yard.

    I have autoimmune issues and am pretty sensitive to anything chemical. Its gotten to the point I can't stand the granulated stuff even. But golf courses, again, rarely can detect this awful smell. They water frequently, which I imagine helps a lot. And I usually play in the afternoon, so maybe its dissipated by then.
  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    vernon wrote:


    I live a hundred yards from the green on the right side of a par 5. Been here five years and love it even though I rarely play the course and am a member elsewhere. My yard and house catch balls constantly from people trying to reach the green in two. If the wind is out of the south (into the golfers face) I'll get 8 - 10 balls on an average weekend day. House probably gets hit 20 - 25 times per year. My brother lives up the street on a par 4 and he's truly in "kill" zone. About 200 - 230 from the white tees (where most of the slicers play) and about 50 yards to the right. He's replaced three windows this year alone. Pisses him off but I really don't complain as the golf course was here before I was and as a 40 year participant in the game, I knew the risks coming in. Doesn't bother me in the least.



    I have a sign in my backyard welcoming golfers to enter to find their balls but asking them to please not play out of the yard. Even though my yard is 10 yards beyond OB, people still hit em' if they like the lie! As for chemicals, I apply WAY more stuff to my lawn than the golf course ever would over the course of a year. Nonetheless, just from the sounds of your concerns, I sincerely doubt you would be happy in a golf course environment. You have to be pretty laid back or you'll find yourself becoming upset for one reason or another on a daily basis. Every time you see the maintenance crew applying product, you'll be wondering what it is and if you made a mistake. Every time you find a ball in your yard you'll wonder what if your son had been out there. And, it can get pretty noisy if the club hosts many charity tournaments. Lot's of drunks and people who have little experience in golf course etiquette.



    As I said, I love it. My brother on the other hand wishes he would have built elsewhere. Good luck!
    I think that is a very good assessment, you have to be a certain type of individual to enjoy living on a golf course, otherwisea person will lose his patience too often.
  • moose557moose557 Members Posts: 725 ✭✭
    teejaywhy wrote:


    I believe the chemical application practices have changed and improved over the years not just from an environmental standpoint, but cost as well. Chemical application is very tightly controlled. Of course, there is a vocal faction who believe that golf is a threat to the planet but I don't find these claims to have much credibility especially considering the source. Nonetheless, it is a good idea to do your own due diligence as it is you and your family who will be directly affected.



    Personally, I would never want to live on a golf course just because of the daily proximity of... golfers. 40 years of observing the behavior of a small percentage of idiots is enough to make me realize I have no desire to have a steady stream of ball collectors and urinators on my property on a daily basis.



    And the particular property you are looking at... inside dogleg... no thanks.




    Ya I would also be concerned about the house being right on the dogleg. I had a buddy who lived off the fairway of a par 4 and he had an incredible outdoor setup with a pool, hot tub, fire pit, outdoor grilling station and he basically couldnt use it during daylight because golf balls were constantly flying into his yard and no one wanted to risk serious injury. Also, when inside I had the crap scared out of my a couple times by golf balls hitting the house. Especially the windows of the living room. I cant see if there is any fence on the yard, but there is a chance your going to have very little privacy with golfers outside your back door all day, going into your yard to find there balls.



    I would never live on the fairway of a course for these reasons. Add in your son and your concerns over the chemicals and I feel maybe your best bet for peace of mind would be to keep looking.
  • BillyZ2BillyZ2 Members Posts: 5,248 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I think the lack of privacy would bug me, especially when wife or daughter is out sunbathing. Guys will start ogling, especially when they drink beer. I think you really have to be careful when selecting a residence on a golf course.
  • caniac6caniac6 Members Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I have an English Setter that barks at anything that moves, so if I lived on a course, the membership would probably take up a collection to buy a new house for me.
  • ElizabettaElizabetta Members Posts: 3

    I personally would not buy a house on a golf course due to the close proximity of frequent pesticide use. We made the mistake of purchasing our dream home next door to an ornamental nursery, which provided us with beautiful views but almost daily spraying with a fogger. They spray pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides, day in and day out, and we cannot go outside or leave our windows open most days. We had our home tested and found 5 different chemicals that are routinely used on their fields, inside our house, including chlorpyrifos, which has not been sold for household use for at least a decade due to it's toxicity. We do not use any pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or even harsh chemicals for cleaning, so this was quite distressing. We have subsequently read a study showing that people who live within 2,000 meters of a farming operation have higher rates of birth defects and cancer. So, for your own health and piece of mind, I would buy something FAR away from golf courses and ornamental farming operations.

  • ElizabettaElizabetta Members Posts: 3

    I personally would not buy a house on a golf course due to the close proximity of frequent pesticide use. We made the mistake of purchasing our dream home next door to an ornamental nursery, which provided us with beautiful views but almost daily spraying with a fogger. They spray pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides, day in and day out, and we cannot go outside or leave our windows open most days. We had our home tested and found 5 different chemicals that are routinely used on their fields, inside our house, including chlorpyrifos, which has not been sold for household use for at least a decade due to it's toxicity. We do not use any pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or even harsh chemicals for cleaning, so this was quite distressing. We have subsequently read a study showing that people who live within 2,000 meters of a farming operation have higher rates of birth defects and cancer. So, for your own health and piece of mind, I would buy something FAR away from golf courses and ornamental farming operations.

  • ElizabettaElizabetta Members Posts: 3

    I personally would not buy a house on a golf course due to the close proximity of frequent pesticide use. We made the mistake of purchasing our dream home next door to an ornamental nursery, which provided us with beautiful views but almost daily spraying with a fogger. They spray pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides, day in and day out, and we cannot go outside or leave our windows open most days. We had our home tested and found 5 different chemicals that are routinely used on their fields, inside our house, including chlorpyrifos, which has not been sold for household use for at least a decade due to it's toxicity. We do not use any pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or even harsh chemicals for cleaning, so this was quite distressing. We have subsequently read a study showing that people who live within 2,000 meters of a farming operation have higher rates of birth defects and cancer. So, for your own health and piece of mind, I would buy something FAR away from golf courses and ornamental farming operations.

  • stickfishstickfish Members Posts: 110 ✭✭✭

    To begin with, all fungicides and herbicides are pesticides by definition. That being said if the situation you are describing is as bad as it sounds you need to contact your respective State Chemists office. If the drift is as you decribe they may be employing unlicensed applicators and utilizing the one identity on record licensed to purchase what may be a restrictive use product.

  • Man_O_WarMan_O_War Members Posts: 2,897 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @dmblanch said:
    You appear to live on the first hole of your country club. I've found which one it is, but I won't name it here. It's a 400 yard par 4 from the blue tees, so good drives are supposed to land between those two sandtraps. Bad drives can reach your house. Drives can go 300 yards or 900 feet. They can break windshields or knock you unconscious.

    What's worse is that you live on the first hole. Nobody is warmed up yet and their drives will be even more erratic than usual. If they lose the first or second attempt, they'll put down a third.

    You may be thinking about this home as a serene country oasis with green space. At night, it will be peaceful. During the day, starting early every morning, expect to have uninvited guests rooting around, mixed with surprising CLUNKS on the roof every so often. Some knuckleheads will try to hop the fence, many will try to fish balls over the fence with ball retrievers.

    Find a driving range and watch people hit for a half an hour sometime. Note how little they can control where their shots go. You may decide this house is not for you.

    can't he put a high wide net to put up?

    as for the chemicals/toxins.. i remember one Julian something..PGA tour player who passed away some years back. His family blamed it on chemicals from golf courses.

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