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Do some courses have a real thick fringe around the green

 Jackal66 ·  
Jackal66Jackal66 Members  316WRX Points: 102Handicap: 22Posts: 316 Greens
Joined:  in Courses, Memberships and Travel #1

A public course that we play a lot, has changed this year.

The fringe around the green is 1inch+ in thickness.

You can't putt onto the green.

It forces a wedge shot.

If I'm in this stuff, a 5 wood putt gets me on the green.

Does any other courses do this?

Everyone hates it.

It's almost like a pool table.

Let me know your experiences.

Thanks

Posted:
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Comments

  • ArtMBgolfArtMBgolf Members  573WRX Points: 127Handicap: 8Posts: 573 Golden Tee
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    Courses that don't have a low cut fringe are usually low budget, trying to save some work.

    During CV we will see other cost/work saving changes.

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  • raynorfan1raynorfan1 Members  3875WRX Points: 401Posts: 3,875 Titanium Tees
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    My home course - which is not generally considered “low budget” - maintains the collars at about 1” height. If you’re more than an inch or two off the green and on the collar, you can’t really putt it.

    The next cut of rough is generally much thicker. If you expect to be able to putt, you should probably hit and hold the green.

    Posted:
  • hollabachgthollabachgt Members  767WRX Points: 200Handicap: 2.0Posts: 767 Golden Tee
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    Philly Cricket Club does not maintain fringes for either their St. Martins or Wissahickon courses (not sure about Militia Hill). The green goes straight into the normal height rough. I know a few others high end private clubs have begun to bring this practice back. It's a bit different at first but you get use to it. Makes you pay for short sided misses and keeps you honest with your approaches.

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  • Jackal66Jackal66 Members  316WRX Points: 102Handicap: 22Posts: 316 Greens
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    That's what I've wondered.

    Some of the nicer courses, and private clubs we've been invited to have a nice apron about 1-1\2 to 2 feet wide.

    You can putt from these aprons.


    Only this season, this particular course had the drop off onto the greens.

    It's a rather short course, and we thought it might be a way to make the course more difficult.

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  • hollabachgthollabachgt Members  767WRX Points: 200Handicap: 2.0Posts: 767 Golden Tee
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    100 years ago fringes on american courses were not a common or standardized as they typically are today. In many instances fringes just didn't exist. As some of these high pedigree classic courses began restoring their course without a fringe cut others have followed.

    Granted, it is not exactly less expensive to care for a course this way, the fringe allows for a turning area for the mower while cutting both the rough and green, it's a bit more challenging without the fringe.

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  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members  2645WRX Points: 1,046Posts: 2,645 Titanium Tees
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    I see places cut the fringe at fairway height and attempt to use their fairway mower to do the job. They just make a pass around the green on a trip down when mowing the fairway. Typically the fringes are, as you might have guessed, one mower width wide. Which is kind of wide. Where it gets messy around here is you have bent grass greens but bermuda or zoysia fairways. The grasses intermingle in the fringe some, exacerbated by the guys mowing the greens mowing less and less. There are a bunch of places with shrinking greens and now have fairway or even rough growing on the green pads.

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  • Jackal66Jackal66 Members  316WRX Points: 102Handicap: 22Posts: 316 Greens
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    I have noticed that. On some of the nice bentgrass greens, you can see runners of bermuda rough creeping out onto the green.

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  • mallratmallrat Members  3343WRX Points: 482Posts: 3,343 Titanium Tees
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    From what I have read it’s just the opposite. As budgets are shrinking, staffs dwindling (becoming harder and harder to find greenskeepers) and time is in shorter supply, I have read that some Supers are doing this in an effort to reduce labor and mow times. Same reason a lot of courses are going away from a step cut, first cut or whatever you want to call it.

    Posted:
  • Jackal66Jackal66 Members  316WRX Points: 102Handicap: 22Posts: 316 Greens
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    One good aspect at this course is: once on the green, your ball won't roll off.

    Posted:
  • BNGLBNGL Jupiter, FloridaMembers  1985WRX Points: 720Posts: 1,985 Platinum Tees
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    As an aside to this, I would go absolutely nuclear on crew members that turned on the fringes/collars. I absolutely despised the wear patterns and didn’t want weak collar areas plus they all had turning boards to use, that was my biggest pet peeve on a golf course. We stressed to them everyday don’t turn on collars/fringes with your walkers, and especially triplexes. But that being said there’s some courses where it’s not possible to not turn in the collar because of a steep bunker face or pond etc.

    Posted:
  • me05501me05501 Members  443WRX Points: 35Posts: 443 Greens
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    When Jack Nicklaus design group build the Bear Trace at Harrison Bay near here they specified fescue collars around all the greens.

    The original greens were bent grass and the fairways are Bermuda, so the fringes looked a little out of place to begin with. The main problem was that they couldn't survive the summers here. The local construction team tried to convince the design team of this early on, but they insisted that the fringes were going to be an integral hallmark of the design.

    After 2-3 seasons of playing around dead fescue sod, the fringes were removed and the course was much better for it.

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