Competing against the best

How important is it for junior golfers, for long term development?

Is it better to win early and often against inferior, but not terrible, competition? Or should they struggle, and typically lose to, the best there is?

Comments

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    edited Apr 3, 2019 2:40pm #2

    Neither matter.

    You will have the crowd that says it is good for long term development to know how to win.

    You have the crowd that will say winning early will put too much pressure on a kid.

    Honestly, neither matter because every kid is different. They are going to be successful if it is meant to be and they won't if it isn't meant to be.

    I think it is more important to practice with good players on a daily basis. The end goal is to get to the top and stay at the top.

    Post edited by heavy_hitter on
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    @leezer99 said:
    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    Nice hyperbole

    I will ask a follow up: if a kid gets easily discouraged and quits due to losing to the best, don’t you think that is good to know sooner than later (and perhaps work on improving that mental aspect)? Or are you in the “ignorance is bliss”, living in slow motion camp?

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    Nice hyperbole

    I will ask a follow up: if a kid gets easily discouraged and quits due to losing to the best, don’t you think that is good to know sooner than later (and perhaps work on improving that mental aspect)? Or are you in the “ignorance is bliss”, living in slow motion camp?

    Why change your kid into something that he isn't? Be happy with who they are without making them into who you want them to be.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    Nice hyperbole

    I will ask a follow up: if a kid gets easily discouraged and quits due to losing to the best, don’t you think that is good to know sooner than later (and perhaps work on improving that mental aspect)? Or are you in the “ignorance is bliss”, living in slow motion camp?

    Why change your kid into something that he isn't? Be happy with who they are without making them into who you want them to be.

    To be fair, my comment assumes parents are actually interested in helping their children develop to reach their potential, including working on weaknesses. It has nothing to do with what I want for my kid (he chose golf, not me).

    If that makes me an overbearing parent then so be it.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    Nice hyperbole

    I will ask a follow up: if a kid gets easily discouraged and quits due to losing to the best, don’t you think that is good to know sooner than later (and perhaps work on improving that mental aspect)? Or are you in the “ignorance is bliss”, living in slow motion camp?

    Why change your kid into something that he isn't? Be happy with who they are without making them into who you want them to be.

    To be fair, my comment assumes parents are actually interested in helping their children develop to reach their potential, including working on weaknesses. It has nothing to do with what I want for my kid (he chose golf, not me).

    If that makes me an overbearing parent then so be it.

    My kid loves basketball. He would have given anything to not be short and slow with a build and athletic prowess not suited to play that sport. There is nothing a parent can do to change that.

    He loves playing golf as well and is really good at it. He has faults mentally and physically. The physical faults he works on all the time. The mental faults are a tight line that you have to walk because you don't want to change who they are. You also don't want to make them feel awkward about the way they think. Let them develop at their own pace mentally until they reach puberty and have a better understanding. At puberty, they will have raging hormones and do really stupid stuff. After puberty is the time to teach them the mental side in my opinion.

    I will add this as well as my kid is in the middle of going through puberty. The puberty thing is REAL if you haven't been through it with you kid yet. There are a lot of mental and physical changes in this time period.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    Nice hyperbole

    I will ask a follow up: if a kid gets easily discouraged and quits due to losing to the best, don’t you think that is good to know sooner than later (and perhaps work on improving that mental aspect)? Or are you in the “ignorance is bliss”, living in slow motion camp?

    Why change your kid into something that he isn't? Be happy with who they are without making them into who you want them to be.

    To be fair, my comment assumes parents are actually interested in helping their children develop to reach their potential, including working on weaknesses. It has nothing to do with what I want for my kid (he chose golf, not me).

    If that makes me an overbearing parent then so be it.

    My kid loves basketball. He would have given anything to not be short and slow with a build and athletic prowess not suited to play that sport. There is nothing a parent can do to change that.

    He loves playing golf as well and is really good at it. He has faults mentally and physically. The physical faults he works on all the time. The mental faults are a tight line that you have to walk because you don't want to change who they are. You also don't want to make them feel awkward about the way they think. Let them develop at their own pace mentally until they reach puberty and have a better understanding. At puberty, they will have raging hormones and do really stupid stuff. After puberty is the time to teach them the mental side in my opinion.

    I will add this as well as my kid is in the middle of going through puberty. The puberty thing is REAL if you haven't been through it with you kid yet. There are a lot of mental and physical changes in this time period.

    I personally don’t agree that you shouldnt work on mental approach (to all aspects of life) until after puberty. If you wait until they are 14 or 15 it might already be too late. And I am not talking about sending them to a psychiatrist - more along the lines of having a positive attitude, not being afraid or intimidated, staying focused, not giving up or becoming discouraged, visualizing success, and learning to bounce back quickly (reset mentally) after setbacks.

    Should we just leave kids on their own, “letting them be who they are” in these very basic approaches to life?

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    Quite possibly the most ridiculous question ever put on GolfWRX. Absolutely has no bearing on anything long term. A kid that loses to the best might be motivated to work harder, get better and overcome failure. Another kid that loses to the best might decide golf isn't for them, get demotivated and give up.

    Let your kids athletic life unpack in real time and stop living on fast forward.

    Nice hyperbole

    I will ask a follow up: if a kid gets easily discouraged and quits due to losing to the best, don’t you think that is good to know sooner than later (and perhaps work on improving that mental aspect)? Or are you in the “ignorance is bliss”, living in slow motion camp?

    Why change your kid into something that he isn't? Be happy with who they are without making them into who you want them to be.

    To be fair, my comment assumes parents are actually interested in helping their children develop to reach their potential, including working on weaknesses. It has nothing to do with what I want for my kid (he chose golf, not me).

    If that makes me an overbearing parent then so be it.

    My kid loves basketball. He would have given anything to not be short and slow with a build and athletic prowess not suited to play that sport. There is nothing a parent can do to change that.

    He loves playing golf as well and is really good at it. He has faults mentally and physically. The physical faults he works on all the time. The mental faults are a tight line that you have to walk because you don't want to change who they are. You also don't want to make them feel awkward about the way they think. Let them develop at their own pace mentally until they reach puberty and have a better understanding. At puberty, they will have raging hormones and do really stupid stuff. After puberty is the time to teach them the mental side in my opinion.

    I will add this as well as my kid is in the middle of going through puberty. The puberty thing is REAL if you haven't been through it with you kid yet. There are a lot of mental and physical changes in this time period.

    I personally don’t agree that you shouldnt work on mental approach (to all aspects of life) until after puberty. If you wait until they are 14 or 15 it might already be too late. And I am not talking about sending them to a psychiatrist - more along the lines of having a positive attitude, not being afraid or intimidated, staying focused, not giving up or becoming discouraged, visualizing success, and learning to bounce back quickly (reset mentally) after setbacks.

    Should we just leave kids on their own, “letting them be who they are” in these very basic approaches to life?

    I don't recall stating that.

    Everything you mentioned is parenting.

    I am talking about the mental aspect and approach to the game after puberty. There is a huge difference to what you are talking about and I am talking about.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    edited Apr 3, 2019 3:15pm #11

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    I agree with you. Too many parents trying to push the envelope and get their kids to a school with a scholarship. Baseball is the worst. I could honestly care less if my kid gets a scholarship. I would rather him walk on to the school that he wants to play for than to take scholarship money to a school he doesn't want to go to or doesn't fit him. If we have to pay for that school we will pay for it.

    Sport is just sport. If golf ends tomorrow it will save me a lot of money.

    Post edited by heavy_hitter on
  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
    edited Apr 3, 2019 4:42pm #13

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Didn't realize we were in a parenting forum now.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • wlmwlm Members Posts: 85 ✭✭

    Of course all kids are different, but for the player who wants to (and has the ability to) progress and compete at a high level, then I think both of your points are important. I think the universe changes a bit at age 12/13 (or maybe 13/14). In the younger group, you are somewhat at the mercy of the strength of your local tours with some regional travel as a possibility, and maybe pinehurst. After age 13 or 14, for us that is when it came time to decide when it was best to travel for the highest competition. I tried to find my son the best competition within which he could compete, and he wanted to do that. Certain local tours had varying fields, some were very winnable and some were stiff competition. Sometimes he played up in age (even though he was small), and sometimes we traveled (especially for AJGA's). Anyway, to come full circle, I think both of your considerations are important for the competitive player who is looking to keep advancing, and it is somewhat of a personal balancing act as to the approach. This probably didn't help much, but just my perspective coming from the dad of a high school senior.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @wlm said:
    Of course all kids are different, but for the player who wants to (and has the ability to) progress and compete at a high level, then I think both of your points are important. I think the universe changes a bit at age 12/13 (or maybe 13/14). In the younger group, you are somewhat at the mercy of the strength of your local tours with some regional travel as a possibility, and maybe pinehurst. After age 13 or 14, for us that is when it came time to decide when it was best to travel for the highest competition. I tried to find my son the best competition within which he could compete, and he wanted to do that. Certain local tours had varying fields, some were very winnable and some were stiff competition. Sometimes he played up in age (even though he was small), and sometimes we traveled (especially for AJGA's). Anyway, to come full circle, I think both of your considerations are important for the competitive player who is looking to keep advancing, and it is somewhat of a personal balancing act as to the approach. This probably didn't help much, but just my perspective coming from the dad of a high school senior.

    CT is talking about a 9 year old I believe.

    I agree with you. I have said on here many times that golf is different pre and post puberty. Many of these guys are trying to find meaning of their kids being successful at golf before puberty. It really doesn't matter in the development of the athlete what they do before they hit puberty because it changes everything and in many cases levels the playing field.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    Go back and read what I wrote above and your over the top responses. Perhaps you should refrain from comment if you don’t have anything constructive to add. Just a suggestion.

    My son was 9yo...years ago

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    Go back and read what I wrote above and your over the top responses. Perhaps you should refrain from comment if you don’t have anything constructive to add. Just a suggestion.

    My son was 9yo...years ago

    Hmmmm.... maybe you should as well referring to a parenting style. SMH

  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 827 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:
    How important is it for junior golfers, for long term development?

    Is it better to win early and often against inferior, but not terrible, competition? Or should they struggle, and typically lose to, the best there is?

    Having read this thread, I do wish that all of these threads could have some "age parameters" wrapped around the questions. Regardless, to improve (develop long term) in golf I think you need 3 important things:
    1.) The right attitude (competitive)
    2.) Dedication (discipline)
    3.) A plan (goals)

    Some kids have #1 and #2 straight away. In some kids, those can be developed. In some kids, they just aren't built that way. Every kid is different. As far as long term development, I'd say it is good to struggle and good to have it easier some days. This would be akin to playing longer yardages (to struggle) and shorter yardages (to learn to live under par) during practice rounds.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    Go back and read what I wrote above and your over the top responses. Perhaps you should refrain from comment if you don’t have anything constructive to add. Just a suggestion.

    My son was 9yo...years ago

    I reread this post and you are trolling for info. All you are doing. Must be bored at work.

    I went through older posts as well and you mention younger kids. You wouldn't be asking this information if you had a 14 year old as you should already know it. The questions you ask wouldn't be for an older kid.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    Go back and read what I wrote above and your over the top responses. Perhaps you should refrain from comment if you don’t have anything constructive to add. Just a suggestion.

    My son was 9yo...years ago

    I reread this post and you are trolling for info. All you are doing. Must be bored at work.

    I went through older posts as well and you mention younger kids. You wouldn't be asking this information if you had a 14 year old as you should already know it. The questions you ask wouldn't be for an older kid.

    Yes I am asking for info on this forum, like everyone else

    No my son isn’t 14 like yours is (or about to be)

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,003 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    @heavy_hitter said:

    @CTgolf said:

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    @leezer99 said:
    So if your kid is the 'best' 9 year old out there and has no competition does that mean they will develop into becoming the next #golfprodigy or will they lose their edge because winning comes so easy to them? This line of questioning has no bearing on anything.

    And yes, your entire line of thought is exactly what is wrong with youth sports.

    Take a chill pill - I’m sorry if this is conflicts with your free range parenting style.

    Wow.... That is your conclusion? How old was your kid when he started wiping his own *** or do you still do it for him?

    Go back and read what I wrote above and your over the top responses. Perhaps you should refrain from comment if you don’t have anything constructive to add. Just a suggestion.

    My son was 9yo...years ago

    I reread this post and you are trolling for info. All you are doing. Must be bored at work.

    I went through older posts as well and you mention younger kids. You wouldn't be asking this information if you had a 14 year old as you should already know it. The questions you ask wouldn't be for an older kid.

    Yes I am asking for info on this forum, like everyone else

    No my son isn’t 14 like yours is (or about to be)

    To my point. You have asked the same question 1000 different ways. Sometimes you have to slow down. Don't get so impatient. There isn't a book, a blog, a podcast, or a movie on how to develop a kid into a collegiate or beyond golfer. Every kid is different and if there was an answer to it we could bottle it and sell it. If it happens it will happen and if doesn't it won't.

  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    I don’t think I have asked the same question in many (let alone 1000s) of ways.

    I asked be it was a topic of discussion among parents I interact with and wanted to get the forum’s views.

    I guess I made a mistake in doing so.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    @CTgolf said:
    I don’t think I have asked the same question in many (let alone 1000s) of ways.

    I asked be it was a topic of discussion among parents I interact with and wanted to get the forum’s views.

    I guess I made a mistake in doing so.

    If you want them to play against better competition have them play up. If you want to only play kids in your same graduating class you're going to have to fly all over the country seeking the top talent out.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • kekoakekoa ClubWRX Posts: 8,782 ClubWRX

    Ill let you know in a few years. Yup my kid is 9 and started competing against 11 yr olds. He beats a lot of them and has won as well. Honestly Im not sure whats going on in his head and if he even cares thats he beat a kid a kid that hits it 50 yards longer than him. Honestly him winning is important to me, but I dont think he gives a rats ****. Currently he is getting comfortable competing at a higher level which is great.

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 207 ✭✭

    Okay I am going to try to respond to your original question, with a little less abrasive attitude, from the perspective of someone who has coached a multitude of sports for over a decade.
    It all depends on your son. This is not a question you can get a fundamental answer on because it is entirely dependent on the mental and personality make up of your son. I primarily coached teams in the middle levels of school size which offered both opportunity to demolish lower sized schools and struggle against larger schools. Certain players/teams I have coached have thrived on playing beyond their capability and sometimes struggling while others it destroyed their psyche and we had severe issues re-building their confidence. By the same token some enjoyed that feeling of accomplishment by winning against level or inferior opponents while others found it to be an empty victory. You have to gauge your own son and what is going to do him best. Is he mentally comfortable enough with his own level of play to step up against opponents who are going to most likely defeat him or does he need the validation of winning no matter the opponent? You aren't going to find the answers here, this is something that you are going to have to get defined from where your son is at this moment. Just remember, golf is fundamentally not about playing against the other person, it is about playing against the course and against your own capabilities. My son has really taken this attitude this year that his goal should be to play the best he can and improve as the year goes on and finishing places are secondary.

    Dad's Bag

    Driver: Ping G30 10 degree, Aldila Reg Flex
    3W, and 7W: Cleveland Black, Bassara, Lite Flex
    5i - PW: Titleist AP1 716, DG XP90 Reg Flex
    W: 48 Cleveland Rotex 3
    W: 52 Cleveland Rotex 2
    W: 56 Vokey SM6 F Grind
    P: TP Mills Flat-T Proto
    Ball: Srixon Q-Star

    Son's Bag (9 years old)
    Driver: Callaway XR16, Flynn Shaft (Set to 15.5)
    3W: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 19.5)
    4H: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 25)
    5i-PW: US Kids Tour Series TS2
    W: 52, 56 degree US Kids Tour Series TS2
    P: Nike Oven MC-07W Prototype
    Ball: Wilson Duo Soft/Callaway Chrome Soft Truvis
  • TigerMomTigerMom Posts: 222 ✭✭

    This post is funny - I literally LOL’d

    To become the best you have to compete against the best, period

    Becoming the best doesn’t just mean being ranked #1, it is BECOMING THE BEST YOU CAN BE FOR YOUR OWN POTENTIAL

    You also eventually become who you spend time with in general

    If you compete against lower level competition IN ANY SPORT OR ACTIVITY you will play worse than your potential

    Opposite is true if you play with/against better players - kids who are competitive will RISE TO THE OCCASION

    Good to win and have positive associations, but if a child is that easily discouraged she won’t have what it takes to succeed down the line anyway - sorry

  • kcapkcap Members Posts: 154 ✭✭

    Welcome Back TM!
    My son prefers playing with better competition -only because he wants to beat them some day!

    That said, what i love about golf is that you are playing against the golf course and yourself at this junior age. We have played rounds and been in the bottom 25% - but liked the score. Conversely, we have played tournaments and won or placed but hated the score. My point being... for me - it all boils down to the score - given the yardage, golf course, conditions, did he play better or worse than potential.

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