Where is the best competition for junior golf?

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Comments

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,004 ✭✭




    What do you mean? They leave school and live down south for the winter? Not true - that I know for a fact.



    Playing or traveling during winter breaks - yes. Playing in tournaments year round - yes, but definitely not the case at younger ages.




    You don't know that for a fact. I know several kids that are from up north, the kids are home schooled, and they live in Florida during the winter. Same exact thing goes for several international kids.




    Of the D1 players I mentioned, I know that for a fact. I never said or mentioned there weren't players from the north/international players being home schooled or living down south for the winter.




    You didn't say that. Read what you wrote.
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭
    Both are home schooled: DJ Invitational

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.






  • What do you mean? They leave school and live down south for the winter? Not true - that I know for a fact.



    Playing or traveling during winter breaks - yes. Playing in tournaments year round - yes, but definitely not the case at younger ages.




    You don't know that for a fact. I know several kids that are from up north, the kids are home schooled, and they live in Florida during the winter. Same exact thing goes for several international kids.




    Of the D1 players I mentioned, I know that for a fact. I never said or mentioned there weren't players from the north/international players being home schooled or living down south for the winter.




    You didn't say that. Read what you wrote.




    In response to Tiger’s statement? Anyone that’s ranked?
  • leezer99 wrote:




    Good luck modeling after an overwhelming minority of players that took this route and had success. Let’s pick out the few outliers and ignore the overwhelming majority like the contrarians do on all counter arguments on this forum. And let’s ignore the fact that I said under a certain age as a caveat.
  • Tannerbug33Tannerbug33 Posts: 119 ✭✭
    My sons couch jokes and told my son he needed to be home schooled so he could play more in the winter months.

    I laughed I told him his mother didn't like him that much. They but heads way to much when it comes to school work 🤣🤣🤣
  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 963 ✭✭

    leezer99 wrote:


    Both are home schooled: DJ Invitational




    Good luck modeling after an overwhelming minority of players that took this route and had success. Let's pick out the few outliers and ignore the overwhelming majority like the contrarians do on all counter arguments on this forum. And let's ignore the fact that I said under a certain age as a caveat.




    I was just pointing out a fact. No commentary made on the benefits or pitfalls either way.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • leezer99 wrote:


    leezer99 wrote:




    Good luck modeling after an overwhelming minority of players that took this route and had success. Let's pick out the few outliers and ignore the overwhelming majority like the contrarians do on all counter arguments on this forum. And let's ignore the fact that I said under a certain age as a caveat.




    I was just pointing out a fact. No commentary made on the benefits or pitfalls either way.




    That’s my bad. Just tired of the outlier contrarian arguments and those that are so opinionated based on their own individual situation.
  • kcapkcap Members Posts: 154 ✭✭
    Just curious, Does anyone have a example of home schooled child that did not work out? To clarify, I mean not working out in terms of socially and looking for the overwhelming majority that was mentioned above.
  • barrysmootbarrysmoot It's Not So Much How You Drive, But How You Arrive ;) Posts: 398 ClubWRX
    kcap wrote:


    Just curious, Does anyone have a example of home schooled child that did not work out? To clarify, I mean not working out in terms of socially and looking for the overwhelming majority that was mentioned above.




    Can you clarify what you define by "Did not work out?" Curious too image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
  • kcapkcap Members Posts: 154 ✭✭
    barrysmoot wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Just curious, Does anyone have a example of home schooled child that did not work out? To clarify, I mean not working out in terms of socially and looking for the overwhelming majority that was mentioned above.




    Can you clarify what you define by "Did not work out?" Curious too image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />


    My kids are not home schooled and will not be for the foreseeable future.



    I just keep reading individuals post about how 'home schooling is detrimental". I assume they mean detrimental to the overall development of the child - so just looking for an example. It is a very gray area and really depends upon your definition of development etc.



    To be clear. "Did not work out" -- does not imply success/failure in golf or any other sport/activity. There could be a variety of reasons for that.
  • kcap wrote:

    barrysmoot wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Just curious, Does anyone have a example of home schooled child that did not work out? To clarify, I mean not working out in terms of socially and looking for the overwhelming majority that was mentioned above.




    Can you clarify what you define by "Did not work out?" Curious too image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />


    My kids are not home schooled and will not be for the foreseeable future.



    I just keep reading individuals post about how 'home schooling is detrimental". I assume they mean detrimental to the overall development of the child - so just looking for an example. It is a very gray area and really depends upon your definition of development etc.



    To be clear. "Did not work out" -- does not imply success/failure in golf or any other sport/activity. There could be a variety of reasons for that.




    I’m sure it’s going to be hard to find stories on the ones that didn’t work out without first hand knowlede; highly unlikely that it would be publicized like the success stories. Personally, it would be hard for me to believe that playing an individual sport and being home schooled is beneficial for the skill sets you would need to have success in certain areas of finance, big law or any other service industry.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭
    Regarding home-schooling, I'm sure this post will rub a lot of people the wrong way - but here goes:



    In my limited exposure, parents who are interested in home-schooling their children are capable and motivated to make it work. Some examples I have come across have the kids home-schooled until 6th or 7th grade, at which point they integrate into the local middle school to allow for a year or two ahead of high school to acclimate socially and get used to the daily routine outside the home-school environment. The middle school they attend will typically allow the student to take more advanced classes depending on their aptitude and knowledge base.



    By the time the kids join the traditional school, they are usually far ahead of their peers, in all disciplines, but particularly in subjects like math, where large(r) class sizes prevent kids from learning at their ideal pace due to teachers having to accomodate to the lowest level (hard to move ahead to the next subject if the weakest student still doesn't get the initial concepts required as foundation for later). In some cases I've seen children 2-3 years ahead in math, and able to take the SAT while in 8th grade and score exceptionally high on the math portion (trigonometry is the highest level needed for SAT, and usually taught in 10th grade). Imagine not having to spend much time for SAT prep in high school because you've already done all the heavy lifting by middle school - huge advantage for a busy high school student trying to balance a heavy school workload with high level sports to not have to stress for such an important exam, which often helps determine how college coaches perceive your academic strength in the recruiting process.



    Meanwhile home-schooling allows flexibility of schedule and minimizes inefficient downtime, allowing a talented student more free time to focus on an extra-curricular activity that he is passionate about and can achieve/perform at an extremely high level. Some of these kids are practicing/training 5-6 hours a day - you can't do that going to a traditional school. Also, being able to travel freely for tournaments/competitions and migrate to other areas to accomodate for weather/seasons also provides optimal opportunities for becoming an expert in one's chosen craft. And for most home-schoolers the learning doesn't stop in the summer - they go year-round, and can cover more material and subjects at an earlier age. Imagine being able to learn more stuff, and not just to do better on a standardized test which ultimately is used to keep a traditional school accountable, but for the sake of actually learning and enjoying the process.



    And this track is not just for kids looking to make a living in the future doing their chosen activity; yes it could also help them get into college, but more importantly there is inherent value in being one of the best at something: along with the confidence and self-worth it brings, the hard work, determination and sacrifice needed to succeed in something at the highest level as a youth carries over to other aspects of life later on.



    Of course this all comes at a high price: opportunity cost of lost income from a parent who DIY, or the $ spent outsourcing the home-schooling and paying an expert to assist. It's not for people living paycheck to paycheck or worried about getting by financially. But it is an option for a large number of families (particularly ones with a SAH parent), and there are huge economies of scale if you have multiple kids (and a no-brainer if you would have sent them all to private school anyway). But everyone I have talked to who has done it successfully thinks their kids got an education superior to the top private school options in their area while also allowing their children the opportunity to spend the enormous amount of time necessary to master whatever it is they are trying to become an expert in.



    My kid(s) are not home-schooled, but if I could do it all over again I would consider it.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭






    What do you mean? They leave school and live down south for the winter? Not true - that I know for a fact.



    Playing or traveling during winter breaks - yes. Playing in tournaments year round - yes, but definitely not the case at younger ages.




    You don't know that for a fact. I know several kids that are from up north, the kids are home schooled, and they live in Florida during the winter. Same exact thing goes for several international kids.




    Of the D1 players I mentioned, I know that for a fact. I never said or mentioned there weren't players from the north/international players being home schooled or living down south for the winter.




    You didn't say that. Read what you wrote.




    In response to Tiger’s statement? Anyone that’s ranked?




    Really??? What do you mean anyone’s that ranked? I mean everyone is ranked so the answer is yes.



    But your clueless to think that people ranked do not winter in a warm state. Heck some then even go to private schools who work with them.
  • CTgolf wrote:


    Regarding home-schooling, I'm sure this post will rub a lot of people the wrong way - but here goes:



    In my limited exposure, parents who are interested in home-schooling their children are capable and motivated to make it work. Some examples I have come across have the kids home-schooled until 6th or 7th grade, at which point they integrate into the local middle school to allow for a year or two ahead of high school to acclimate socially and get used to the daily routine outside the home-school environment. The middle school they attend will typically allow the student to take more advanced classes depending on their aptitude and knowledge base.



    By the time the kids join the traditional school, they are usually far ahead of their peers, in all disciplines, but particularly in subjects like math, where large(r) class sizes prevent kids from learning at their ideal pace due to teachers having to accomodate to the lowest level (hard to move ahead to the next subject if the weakest student still doesn't get the initial concepts required as foundation for later). In some cases I've seen children 2-3 years ahead in math, and able to take the SAT while in 8th grade and score exceptionally high on the math portion (trigonometry is the highest level needed for SAT, and usually taught in 10th grade). Imagine not having to spend much time for SAT prep in high school because you've already done all the heavy lifting by middle school - huge advantage for a busy high school student trying to balance a heavy school workload with high level sports to not have to stress for such an important exam, which often helps determine how college coaches perceive your academic strength in the recruiting process.



    Meanwhile home-schooling allows flexibility of schedule and minimizes inefficient downtime, allowing a talented student more free time to focus on an extra-curricular activity that he is passionate about and can achieve/perform at an extremely high level. Some of these kids are practicing/training 5-6 hours a day - you can't do that going to a traditional school. Also, being able to travel freely for tournaments/competitions and migrate to other areas to accomodate for weather/seasons also provides optimal opportunities for becoming an expert in one's chosen craft. And for most home-schoolers the learning doesn't stop in the summer - they go year-round, and can cover more material and subjects at an earlier age. Imagine being able to learn more stuff, and not just to do better on a standardized test which ultimately is used to keep a traditional school accountable, but for the sake of actually learning and enjoying the process.



    And this track is not just for kids looking to make a living in the future doing their chosen activity; yes it could also help them get into college, but more importantly there is inherent value in being one of the best at something: along with the confidence and self-worth it brings, the hard work, determination and sacrifice needed to succeed in something at the highest level as a youth carries over to other aspects of life later on.



    Of course this all comes at a high price: opportunity cost of lost income from a parent who DIY, or the $ spent outsourcing the home-schooling and paying an expert to assist. It's not for people living paycheck to paycheck or worried about getting by financially. But it is an option for a large number of families (particularly ones with a SAH parent), and there are huge economies of scale if you have multiple kids (and a no-brainer if you would have sent them all to private school anyway). But everyone I have talked to who has done it successfully thinks their kids got an education superior to the top private school options in their area while also allowing their children the opportunity to spend the enormous amount of time necessary to master whatever it is they are trying to become an expert in.



    My kid(s) are not home-schooled, but if I could do it all over again I would consider it.




    This is a fair response if your educational choices are limited or not on par with your level of expectation.
  • CTgolfCTgolf Posts: 407 ✭✭

    CTgolf wrote:


    Regarding home-schooling, I'm sure this post will rub a lot of people the wrong way - but here goes:



    In my limited exposure, parents who are interested in home-schooling their children are capable and motivated to make it work. Some examples I have come across have the kids home-schooled until 6th or 7th grade, at which point they integrate into the local middle school to allow for a year or two ahead of high school to acclimate socially and get used to the daily routine outside the home-school environment. The middle school they attend will typically allow the student to take more advanced classes depending on their aptitude and knowledge base.



    By the time the kids join the traditional school, they are usually far ahead of their peers, in all disciplines, but particularly in subjects like math, where large® class sizes prevent kids from learning at their ideal pace due to teachers having to accomodate to the lowest level (hard to move ahead to the next subject if the weakest student still doesn't get the initial concepts required as foundation for later). In some cases I've seen children 2-3 years ahead in math, and able to take the SAT while in 8th grade and score exceptionally high on the math portion (trigonometry is the highest level needed for SAT, and usually taught in 10th grade). Imagine not having to spend much time for SAT prep in high school because you've already done all the heavy lifting by middle school - huge advantage for a busy high school student trying to balance a heavy school workload with high level sports to not have to stress for such an important exam, which often helps determine how college coaches perceive your academic strength in the recruiting process.



    Meanwhile home-schooling allows flexibility of schedule and minimizes inefficient downtime, allowing a talented student more free time to focus on an extra-curricular activity that he is passionate about and can achieve/perform at an extremely high level. Some of these kids are practicing/training 5-6 hours a day - you can't do that going to a traditional school. Also, being able to travel freely for tournaments/competitions and migrate to other areas to accomodate for weather/seasons also provides optimal opportunities for becoming an expert in one's chosen craft. And for most home-schoolers the learning doesn't stop in the summer - they go year-round, and can cover more material and subjects at an earlier age. Imagine being able to learn more stuff, and not just to do better on a standardized test which ultimately is used to keep a traditional school accountable, but for the sake of actually learning and enjoying the process.



    And this track is not just for kids looking to make a living in the future doing their chosen activity; yes it could also help them get into college, but more importantly there is inherent value in being one of the best at something: along with the confidence and self-worth it brings, the hard work, determination and sacrifice needed to succeed in something at the highest level as a youth carries over to other aspects of life later on.



    Of course this all comes at a high price: opportunity cost of lost income from a parent who DIY, or the $ spent outsourcing the home-schooling and paying an expert to assist. It's not for people living paycheck to paycheck or worried about getting by financially. But it is an option for a large number of families (particularly ones with a SAH parent), and there are huge economies of scale if you have multiple kids (and a no-brainer if you would have sent them all to private school anyway). But everyone I have talked to who has done it successfully thinks their kids got an education superior to the top private school options in their area while also allowing their children the opportunity to spend the enormous amount of time necessary to master whatever it is they are trying to become an expert in.



    My kid(s) are not home-schooled, but if I could do it all over again I would consider it.




    This is a fair response if your educational choices are limited or not on par with your level of expectation.




    And also you want to free up 4 hours of your kids' time each school day, while allowing for maximum flexibility regardless of time of day or year for activities and family events.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    edited Mar 4, 2019 5:35pm #77

    kcap wrote:

    barrysmoot wrote:

    kcap wrote:


    Just curious, Does anyone have a example of home schooled child that did not work out? To clarify, I mean not working out in terms of socially and looking for the overwhelming majority that was mentioned above.




    Can you clarify what you define by "Did not work out?" Curious too image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />


    My kids are not home schooled and will not be for the foreseeable future.



    I just keep reading individuals post about how 'home schooling is detrimental". I assume they mean detrimental to the overall development of the child - so just looking for an example. It is a very gray area and really depends upon your definition of development etc.



    To be clear. "Did not work out" -- does not imply success/failure in golf or any other sport/activity. There could be a variety of reasons for that.




    I’m sure it’s going to be hard to find stories on the ones that didn’t work out without first hand knowlede; highly unlikely that it would be publicized like the success stories. Personally, it would be hard for me to believe that playing an individual sport and being home schooled is beneficial for the skill sets you would need to have success in certain areas of finance, big law or any other service industry.




    People don’t like to hear this but extremely wealthy people generally home school or have a very flexible private school.



    They also generally have no problem in areas such as law, finance or any other disciplines.



    It too Broad to paint a picture and say that home school is bad. Yes there are plenty of example where I think it is horrible too but in other cases it just makes everyone less stressed.



    When it comes to golf if the kid is at the highest levels the more likely they will not be in traditional public school. I put the emphasis on traditional because there are option In Florida that make public school very very flexible but there not traditional settings like you expect.
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members Posts: 1,011 ✭✭
    Should be a different thread but in Florida they offer classes online. Now most people would think this is home school but it defiantly not.



    We wanted to take advanced classes but they were not offered at the local middle school so we were referred to the district virtual school.



    Very different but still public school. The school and teachers are all in our local district. My daughter see them once a month of if she has a problem or needs to do standardized test. Everything else it done remotely. She free to do her work whenever she wants to but still has talk to teachers every week.



    It’s perfect for a kid who wants to do golf. She able to do her work in half the time and have tons of time to practice. She does the same lessons that she would do at middle school but she does not have the drama or issues. She also meets other kids once a month so and they do team projects together. Some of them are kids into golf too.



    Needless to say this option is perfect but I would also caution that for this to work a kid has to be motivated. The kids she met at through this school are all very motivated and actually very smart and work hard.



    Like I said this has been perfect for us we would have not sent her to public school because her academics were limited on choices. We would had to go to a charter or private school but having a non traditional model was a pretty good choice.
  • kcapkcap Members Posts: 154 ✭✭

    CTgolf wrote:


    Regarding home-schooling, I'm sure this post will rub a lot of people the wrong way - but here goes:



    In my limited exposure, parents who are interested in home-schooling their children are capable and motivated to make it work. Some examples I have come across have the kids home-schooled until 6th or 7th grade, at which point they integrate into the local middle school to allow for a year or two ahead of high school to acclimate socially and get used to the daily routine outside the home-school environment. The middle school they attend will typically allow the student to take more advanced classes depending on their aptitude and knowledge base.



    By the time the kids join the traditional school, they are usually far ahead of their peers, in all disciplines, but particularly in subjects like math, where large® class sizes prevent kids from learning at their ideal pace due to teachers having to accomodate to the lowest level (hard to move ahead to the next subject if the weakest student still doesn't get the initial concepts required as foundation for later). In some cases I've seen children 2-3 years ahead in math, and able to take the SAT while in 8th grade and score exceptionally high on the math portion (trigonometry is the highest level needed for SAT, and usually taught in 10th grade). Imagine not having to spend much time for SAT prep in high school because you've already done all the heavy lifting by middle school - huge advantage for a busy high school student trying to balance a heavy school workload with high level sports to not have to stress for such an important exam, which often helps determine how college coaches perceive your academic strength in the recruiting process.



    Meanwhile home-schooling allows flexibility of schedule and minimizes inefficient downtime, allowing a talented student more free time to focus on an extra-curricular activity that he is passionate about and can achieve/perform at an extremely high level. Some of these kids are practicing/training 5-6 hours a day - you can't do that going to a traditional school. Also, being able to travel freely for tournaments/competitions and migrate to other areas to accomodate for weather/seasons also provides optimal opportunities for becoming an expert in one's chosen craft. And for most home-schoolers the learning doesn't stop in the summer - they go year-round, and can cover more material and subjects at an earlier age. Imagine being able to learn more stuff, and not just to do better on a standardized test which ultimately is used to keep a traditional school accountable, but for the sake of actually learning and enjoying the process.



    And this track is not just for kids looking to make a living in the future doing their chosen activity; yes it could also help them get into college, but more importantly there is inherent value in being one of the best at something: along with the confidence and self-worth it brings, the hard work, determination and sacrifice needed to succeed in something at the highest level as a youth carries over to other aspects of life later on.



    Of course this all comes at a high price: opportunity cost of lost income from a parent who DIY, or the $ spent outsourcing the home-schooling and paying an expert to assist. It's not for people living paycheck to paycheck or worried about getting by financially. But it is an option for a large number of families (particularly ones with a SAH parent), and there are huge economies of scale if you have multiple kids (and a no-brainer if you would have sent them all to private school anyway). But everyone I have talked to who has done it successfully thinks their kids got an education superior to the top private school options in their area while also allowing their children the opportunity to spend the enormous amount of time necessary to master whatever it is they are trying to become an expert in.



    My kid(s) are not home-schooled, but if I could do it all over again I would consider it.




    This is a fair response if your educational choices are limited or not on par with your level of expectation.




    I think this is a really good response irrespective of where you are situated and what educational resources are around you.



    At the end of day..it boils down to the parents and their ability/motivation/knowledge to make work for their child.
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