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College vs turning pro

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  • TripleBogeysrbetterTripleBogeysrbetter Members Posts: 193 ✭✭✭

    There are a lot more high income earners than you think, and they are making a lot more than you think.
    We have now leaped into this.
    Seems a stretch from my original comment about this
    "alot" making 160,000 a year right out of college
    Late twenties old aren't recent college graduates at the 0.1%

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  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 501 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 4, 2019 8:38pm #33

    @TripleBogeysrbetter said:
    There are a lot more high income earners than you think, and they are making a lot more than you think.
    We have now leaped into this.
    Seems a stretch from my original comment about this
    "alot" making 160,000 a year right out of college
    Late twenties old aren't recent college graduates at the 0.1%

    The last chart of $300k+ earners (top 0.1%) are 27-31yo. She's 27.

    But the previous chart also showed 45k (forty-five thousand) 25 year olds making $150k+. It's not much of a stretch.

    Btw, she didn't make $160k out of college either. She only started cashing tournaments 2 years ago (when she was 25).

  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    pretty no brainer decision in my book, she is doing what she loves and as of now, with her earnings she is in the top 1% of population for her age and as a woman. All pro athlete's have to prepare for a second career since most have to hang it up towards mid 30's, golf the exception. So getting the education was good on her behalf and I agree with her Dad there. She will have plenty of time to join the corporate world if that's what she chooses. However, she will probably have more opportunities being a former tennis pro for other ventures especially if she has more success.

  • wlmwlm Members Posts: 100 ✭✭✭

    @leezer99 said:
    That being said, this is the same scenario as Akshay. It hasn't worked out great for him yet but he's getting a ton of experience.

    What hasn't worked out great for him yet. He's still an amateur, playing in the Walker Cup this weekend. He should have at least two starts as a professional before Christmas.

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,311 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @wlm said:

    @leezer99 said:
    That being said, this is the same scenario as Akshay. It hasn't worked out great for him yet but he's getting a ton of experience.

    What hasn't worked out great for him yet. He's still an amateur, playing in the Walker Cup this weekend. He should have at least two starts as a professional before Christmas.

    Monday qualifying. Where is he getting these two starts from?

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 374 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 12:07pm #37

    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    Just a father and son on a journey together through golf....
  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @BloctonGolf11 said:
    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    That’s not how it works in these type of pro sports with money. Can go months not making much and then get hot and make 300 g’s in a few days of work, kind of like golf. I think your missing point though, it’s not always about $.

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 374 ✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 12:24pm #39

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:
    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    That’s not how it works in these type of pro sports with money. Can go months not making much and then get hot and make 300 g’s in a few days of work, kind of like golf. I think your missing point though, it’s not always about $.

    Over 5 years making $538,000 you can still average it out. As well, the crux of the last major set of posts has been about the financials and several people were prognosticating like her $110,000 a year average was without MAJOR expenses that you do not face as a working professional in the accounting field and that is simply not the truth.

    Just a father and son on a journey together through golf....
  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:
    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    That’s not how it works in these type of pro sports with money. Can go months not making much and then get hot and make 300 g’s in a few days of work, kind of like golf. I think your missing point though, it’s not always about $.

    Over 5 years making $538,000 you can still average it out. As well, the crux of the last major set of posts has been about the financials and several people were prognosticating like her $110,000 a year average was without MAJOR expenses that you do not face as a working professional in the accounting field and that is simply not the truth.

    I still don’t think you get it, it’s not always about the money. She obviously had enough to get by or found a way to get by. She’s doing what she likes for now while she still can. You ever made 300,000 in couple days of work?

  • BloctonGolf11BloctonGolf11 Members Posts: 374 ✭✭✭✭

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:
    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    That’s not how it works in these type of pro sports with money. Can go months not making much and then get hot and make 300 g’s in a few days of work, kind of like golf. I think your missing point though, it’s not always about $.

    Over 5 years making $538,000 you can still average it out. As well, the crux of the last major set of posts has been about the financials and several people were prognosticating like her $110,000 a year average was without MAJOR expenses that you do not face as a working professional in the accounting field and that is simply not the truth.

    I still don’t think you get it, it’s not always about the money. She obviously had enough to get by or found a way to get by. She’s doing what she likes for now while she still can. You ever made 300,000 in couple days of work?

    Seriously, I never stated anything about her love of the game or the point of the other parts of the argument, those are separate issues. All I was saying was the numbers being spouted out were a false and overly simplistic picture of the financial situation. Also, you can't take the US Open prize money from this year into the full argument as that was not correlated to her Dad's initial argument or the first 5 years of her career. Quit moving the goalposts and trying to change the subject of what I was responding to.

    Just a father and son on a journey together through golf....
  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 1:06pm #42

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:
    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    That’s not how it works in these type of pro sports with money. Can go months not making much and then get hot and make 300 g’s in a few days of work, kind of like golf. I think your missing point though, it’s not always about $.

    Over 5 years making $538,000 you can still average it out. As well, the crux of the last major set of posts has been about the financials and several people were prognosticating like her $110,000 a year average was without MAJOR expenses that you do not face as a working professional in the accounting field and that is simply not the truth.

    I still don’t think you get it, it’s not always about the money. She obviously had enough to get by or found a way to get by. She’s doing what she likes for now while she still can. You ever made 300,000 in couple days of work?

    Seriously, I never stated anything about her love of the game or the point of the other parts of the argument, those are separate issues. All I was saying was the numbers being spouted out were a false and overly simplistic picture of the financial situation. Also, you can't take the US Open prize money from this year into the full argument as that was not correlated to her Dad's initial argument or the first 5 years of her career. Quit moving the goalposts and trying to change the subject of what I was responding to.

    No one is moving goal posts. We all know there are expenses for being a pro. Maybe she could of gone the corporate route had had a “gasp” kid, which is the biggest major expense you will ever encounter

  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    you say
    “Also, you can't take the US Open prize money from this year into the full argument as that was not correlated to her Dad's initial argument or the first 5 years of her career”

    Can’t take the recent 300,000 into argument because her dad said so?? haha ok

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,322 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 1:54pm #44

    I can tell you this. My daughter is double majoring in Data Analytics and Supply Chain Management. She will make close to 6 figures with a BS and will be paid by the institution that hires her to go back to get her Masters. Once she earns her Master's she will be earning well into 6 figures. She was smart enough as a Freshman to know and understand she didn't care about pursuing golf after college. College golf was just a means to pursue the education she needed to advance into the working world. She loves golf and will continue to play recreational after college. It is also a tool she can use in the business world. There is no way a career in Professional golf will allow her to live the lifestyle she wants to.

  • wlmwlm Members Posts: 100 ✭✭✭

    @leezer99 said:

    @wlm said:

    @leezer99 said:
    That being said, this is the same scenario as Akshay. It hasn't worked out great for him yet but he's getting a ton of experience.

    What hasn't worked out great for him yet. He's still an amateur, playing in the Walker Cup this weekend. He should have at least two starts as a professional before Christmas.

    Monday qualifying. Where is he getting these two starts from?

    Safeway - sponsor exemption
    RSM - exemption from winning Jones Cup Inv'l

  • leezer99leezer99 I swear I am quitting this site every day... Members Posts: 1,311 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @wlm said:

    @leezer99 said:

    @wlm said:

    @leezer99 said:
    That being said, this is the same scenario as Akshay. It hasn't worked out great for him yet but he's getting a ton of experience.

    What hasn't worked out great for him yet. He's still an amateur, playing in the Walker Cup this weekend. He should have at least two starts as a professional before Christmas.

    Monday qualifying. Where is he getting these two starts from?

    Safeway - sponsor exemption
    RSM - exemption from winning Jones Cup Inv'l

    You seem to know. Hope he does well.

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,322 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 5, 2019 8:46pm #47

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:

    @Redjeep83 said:

    @BloctonGolf11 said:
    Okay just catching up but so many of you are not thinking this through. She made $548,000 her first five years (not counting this huge US Open payday) which essentially equates to $110,000 gross per year before taxes. Now start taking out the fact that she is flying to all of these tourneys on her own dime, staying in hotels on her own dime, fronting all of these travelling expenses on her own dime. You can forget this $160,000 a year figure many of you keep throwing out. Once you take out all the expenses involved in being a journeyman tennis player I guarantee you financially she would have done better in 5 years with an accounting degree from Stanford.

    That’s not how it works in these type of pro sports with money. Can go months not making much and then get hot and make 300 g’s in a few days of work, kind of like golf. I think your missing point though, it’s not always about $.

    Over 5 years making $538,000 you can still average it out. As well, the crux of the last major set of posts has been about the financials and several people were prognosticating like her $110,000 a year average was without MAJOR expenses that you do not face as a working professional in the accounting field and that is simply not the truth.

    I still don’t think you get it, it’s not always about the money. She obviously had enough to get by or found a way to get by. She’s doing what she likes for now while she still can. You ever made 300,000 in couple days of work?

    Seriously, I never stated anything about her love of the game or the point of the other parts of the argument, those are separate issues. All I was saying was the numbers being spouted out were a false and overly simplistic picture of the financial situation. Also, you can't take the US Open prize money from this year into the full argument as that was not correlated to her Dad's initial argument or the first 5 years of her career. Quit moving the goalposts and trying to change the subject of what I was responding to.

    I understand exactly what you are saying.

    Tennis players do make more than golfers. I know an average run of the mill LPGA player. She stays in LPGA provided housing when she travels, her husband is her coach, she uses LPGA course provided caddies. At the end of the year she barely breaks even. The grind isn't worth in in my opinion.

  • JuniorGolfParentJuniorGolfParent Members Posts: 75 ✭✭✭

    I’ve always told my son that there are many occupations where you can earn just as much, if not more than, the average PGA Tour Pro; you just have to be willing to work hard to succeed. Find one that you love and keep golf as an avocation.

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