Line on the ball for putting?

 hangontight ·  
hangontighthangontight Members  736WRX Points: 197Posts: 736 Golden Tee
Joined:  edited Jun 11, 2019 in Juniors/College Golf Talk #1

Help? Not help?
If anything, need something to slow him down on green. Routine is too rushed and not putting well. Thinking that using a line, checking it, etc. will force him to focus more on the process. Plays fast Tee to Green (good), but needs to slow down a bit and think more in scoring areas.
Experiences ?

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  • sui generissui generis Members  4449WRX Points: 782Posts: 4,449 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @hangontight said:

    Help? Not help?
    If anything, need something to slow him down on green. Routine is too rushed and not putting well because do it. Thinking that using a line, checking it, etc. will force him to focus more. Plays fast Tee to Green (good), but needs to slow down a bit and think more in scoring areas.
    Experiences ?

    I referee juniors several times every summer. The serious players all use the line, perhaps because they see it on TV. They are well practiced in using the line and I don't see a pace-of-play downside.

    Posted:
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  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members  1572WRX Points: 382Posts: 1,572 Platinum Tees
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    You didn’t mention how old. In some cases we are talking about a maturity thing. If we are talking about older kids just tally up the misses and deduct from next tournament to show potential score. That is how I got my kids attention on rushing.

    Posted:
  • cellywrattcellywratt Members  63WRX Points: 42Posts: 63 Bunkers
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    My boy has the same problem, rushes as soon as he gets over the ball when hes on the green, sometimes doesn't even look at the hole. A line on the ball has helped a little bit but what has worked better is getting him to look at the hole for a long 5 count before taking his putt. This has improved his touch and distance control as well. His coach talks of building a picture in your head about the putt and then putting to the picture.

    Posted:
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Jun 11, 2019 #5

    It depends on how they see the putts. Putting a line on the ball and lining it up doesn't work for everyone. There are linear putters and there are non-linear putters. If you are forcing them to line a ball up, and the are non-linear putters, you may be doing more harm than good.

    A really good book I picked up several years ago was "The Champions Brain" by Bill Hamilton. Talks about getting in the zone and using techniques fro routine. Gives ways to practice routine as well. Very short read and has several good putting drills in the book that we use all of the time.

    https://www.amazon.com/Champions-Brain-Bill-Hamilton/dp/1618632159

    Posted:
  • weavej1weavej1 Members  143WRX Points: 153Posts: 143 Fairways
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    I think it helps...you can also use the line off the tee, not only for aiming down the fairway but the marker transfers on to the face letting you note the contact area. Plus you can quickly identify your ball from across the fairway, speeding play and saving steps.

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  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members  17191WRX Points: 1,419Posts: 17,191 Titanium Tees
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    It helps roughly 25% of people. 50% it does nothing for and about 25% the line actually makes things worse.

    Posted:
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  • luderifficluderiffic Members  16WRX Points: 22Posts: 16 Bunkers
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    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Posted:
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine.

    Posted:
  • leezer99leezer99 Boy - 2026 Members  1817WRX Points: 1,135Handicap: A BillionPosts: 1,817 Platinum Tees
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    Inside 10' use a line. Outside of 10' don't use the line.

    Posted:

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

  • BertGABertGA Members  360WRX Points: 130Posts: 360 Greens
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    I’ve tried encouraging my daughter to use the line. It’s on all her balls. When I ask her to use them, she declines. If she plays with friends, she uses it.

    For myself, I use that line on every single putt outside of 2 ft. I use it so it’s one less thing I have to think about when I’m standing over the ball.

    Posted:
  • leezer99leezer99 Boy - 2026 Members  1817WRX Points: 1,135Handicap: A BillionPosts: 1,817 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @BertGA said:

    .... it’s one less thing I have to think about....

    I have found that thinking and golf don't mix well.

    Posted:

    There's definitely something more important that I should be doing.

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  • luderifficluderiffic Members  16WRX Points: 22Posts: 16 Bunkers
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    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    If my kid was 12 and has been playing for a few years, I would understand your comment.....except my kid is 7. If it were up to him he would just go and wack the ball at the hole without thinking and get frustrated as to why it never goes in. For a 7 year old, to just remember to look at the slope of the green is the start of learning a routine at this point. Having him use a line on the ball is a tool to help him do that. As a father and his golf teacher at this point, it is my job to teach him my routine and he can modify when he gets older.

    Posted:
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    If my kid was 12 and has been playing for a few years, I would understand your comment.....except my kid is 7. If it were up to him he would just go and wack the ball at the hole without thinking and get frustrated as to why it never goes in. For a 7 year old, to just remember to look at the slope of the green is the start of learning a routine at this point. Having him use a line on the ball is a tool to help him do that. As a father and his golf teacher at this point, it is my job to teach him my routine and he can modify when he gets older.

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Posted:
  • nebfannebfan Members  2WRX Points: 62Posts: 2 Starters
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    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Posted:
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @nebfan said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Goes against the opinion of the experts in the business.

    Posted:
  • buckeyeflbuckeyefl Members  6106WRX Points: 1,101Posts: 6,106 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @nebfan said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Winning is fun at any age. Being a parent who puts too much emphasis on winning with a 7-year old is in for a rude awakening in the future. Fun at 7 years old should be the priority instead of living vicariously through our children. Let them be a kid, enjoy other activities and develop the skills, strength and body awareness that comes from kid activities.

    Posted:
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  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @buckeyefl said:

    On -, @nebfan said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Winning is fun at any age. Being a parent who puts too much emphasis on winning with a 7-year old is in for a rude awakening in the future. Fun at 7 years old should be the priority instead of living vicariously through our children. Let them be a kid, enjoy other activities and develop the skills, strength and body awareness that comes from kid activities.

    I also can't stress enough that golf before puberty and after puberty are two different events. What you do before puberty doesn't mean squat.

    Posted:
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members  1572WRX Points: 382Posts: 1,572 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Jun 25, 2019 #19

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @buckeyefl said:

    On -, @nebfan said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Winning is fun at any age. Being a parent who puts too much emphasis on winning with a 7-year old is in for a rude awakening in the future. Fun at 7 years old should be the priority instead of living vicariously through our children. Let them be a kid, enjoy other activities and develop the skills, strength and body awareness that comes from kid activities.

    I also can't stress enough that golf before puberty and after puberty are two different events. What you do before puberty doesn't mean squat.

    No one cares who won the US Kids Worlds when the kids get older. The level and commitment to win at an older age is much higher for both the Kids and the parents. The goal should be to have fun and love playing without that they will never have the commitment that is needed.

    I would argue that winning at very age is very bad for kids. They all learn to expect medals and when they do not win they lose interest. When they get older there is no one that will win every tournament they enter. Just simply not going to happen that is golf. Chances are they lose more tournaments then they will win as they get older.

    Kids actually need to learn how to lose pick themselves up and get better. Learning is very very painful and letting you kids fail at a young age helps them improve. Winning is easy to get addicted to and even more so if you lost a few times.

    Posted:
  • lookylookitzadamlookylookitzadam SoCalMembers  629WRX Points: 232Handicap: 2.7Posts: 629 Golden Tee
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    From what I have gathered, lines on the ball tend to make people tense up and focus so hard on hitting that line that they forget all about speed and tempo. Fluidity is replaced by rigidity and all sorts of pulls/pushes/open face/etc happen.

    Posted:
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
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    On -, @tiger1873 said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @buckeyefl said:

    On -, @nebfan said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Winning is fun at any age. Being a parent who puts too much emphasis on winning with a 7-year old is in for a rude awakening in the future. Fun at 7 years old should be the priority instead of living vicariously through our children. Let them be a kid, enjoy other activities and develop the skills, strength and body awareness that comes from kid activities.

    I also can't stress enough that golf before puberty and after puberty are two different events. What you do before puberty doesn't mean squat.

    No one cares who won the US Kids Worlds when the kids get older. The level and commitment to win at an older age is much higher for both the Kids and the parents. The goal should be to have fun and love playing without that they will never have the commitment that is needed.

    I would argue that winning at very age is very bad for kids. They all learn to expect medals and when they do not win they lose interest. When they get older there is no one that will win every tournament they enter. Just simply not going to happen that is golf. Chances are they lose more tournaments then they will win as they get older.

    Kids actually need to learn how to lose pick themselves up and get better. Learning is very very painful and letting you kids fail at a young age helps them improve. Winning is easy to get addicted to and even more so if you lost a few times.

    I had a short discussion with a Major D1 college coach yesterday at a tournament. He told me he didn't care what a kid did in golf until around 16 years of age. "Girls and Cars change everything. Many of these kids once they hit 16 and get a car drive right by the course and go see a girl."

    Posted:
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members  1572WRX Points: 382Posts: 1,572 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Jun 25, 2019 #22

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @tiger1873 said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @buckeyefl said:

    On -, @nebfan said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    On -, @heavy_hitter said:

    On -, @luderiffic said:

    Seems to have helped my boys at least slow down and look at which way the green is tilting and if its uphill/downhill. I feel they have both improved alot over the past couple of months since we incorporated it into our routine.

    Seriously, if it is "Our Routine" that means it is "Your Routine" not "His Routine". Lining a ball up with a line does not constitute a routine

    Not True my friend. Not True. Your job is to ensure that he has fun. It isn't about winning at 7 or shooting a score.

    Totally disagree if the child is talented. Learning to win at an early age is a skill that stays with a child. Winning is fun at 7. If the child is not very good, then fun is the goal.

    Winning is fun at any age. Being a parent who puts too much emphasis on winning with a 7-year old is in for a rude awakening in the future. Fun at 7 years old should be the priority instead of living vicariously through our children. Let them be a kid, enjoy other activities and develop the skills, strength and body awareness that comes from kid activities.

    I also can't stress enough that golf before puberty and after puberty are two different events. What you do before puberty doesn't mean squat.

    No one cares who won the US Kids Worlds when the kids get older. The level and commitment to win at an older age is much higher for both the Kids and the parents. The goal should be to have fun and love playing without that they will never have the commitment that is needed.

    I would argue that winning at very age is very bad for kids. They all learn to expect medals and when they do not win they lose interest. When they get older there is no one that will win every tournament they enter. Just simply not going to happen that is golf. Chances are they lose more tournaments then they will win as they get older.

    Kids actually need to learn how to lose pick themselves up and get better. Learning is very very painful and letting you kids fail at a young age helps them improve. Winning is easy to get addicted to and even more so if you lost a few times.

    I had a short discussion with a Major D1 college coach yesterday at a tournament. He told me he didn't care what a kid did in golf until around 16 years of age. "Girls and Cars change everything. Many of these kids once they hit 16 and get a car drive right by the course and go see a girl."

    I heard the same thing from a D1 coach as well. it is much more common than people want to believe.

    Posted:
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  • JuniorGolfParentJuniorGolfParent Members  234WRX Points: 139Posts: 234 Fairways
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    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    Posted:
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members  3779WRX Points: 1,104Posts: 3,779 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #24

    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    No there isn't, but we are talking 12-14 year olds in middle school. Golf is different pre and post puberty.
    There is a fine line in top players. Colleges are looking for "The Guy". A top player is a dime a dozen.

    Posted:
  • tiger1873tiger1873 Members  1572WRX Points: 382Posts: 1,572 Platinum Tees
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    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    I would say the better kids have all been playing since they were younger then middle school. I don't think you can tell by just looking at score though. Kids in middle school all have weakness in their games even the ones that win.

    The reason I say score doesn't matter is a kid could be weak in their short game but very strong elsewhere. Some kids might have 12-14 tap in rounds for a bogey while another kid can't hit their irons. The kid who taps in eventually figures out the putting issues and instantly loses those strokes and ends up being under par most of the time.

    Posted:
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members  17191WRX Points: 1,419Posts: 17,191 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #26

    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    My top high school players currently didn’t play golf in middle school.

    Posted:
  • wlmwlm Members  114WRX Points: 103Posts: 114 Fairways
    Joined:  #27

    On -, @iteachgolf said:

    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    My top high school players currently didn’t play golf in middle school.

    That is the exception rather than the rule.

    Posted:
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  • Kcct82Kcct82 Members  322WRX Points: 209Posts: 322 Greens
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    We started with the line, and then got lazy and stopped using it. I think concentrating on how hard to putt to lag it close is more important for beginning to intermediate juniors.

    Posted:
  • BertGABertGA Members  360WRX Points: 130Posts: 360 Greens
    Joined:  edited Jun 26, 2019 #29

    On -, @Kcct82 said:

    We started with the line, and then got lazy and stopped using it. I think concentrating on how hard to putt to lag it close is more important for beginning to intermediate juniors.

    I agree. The line is generally only important for straight putts, unless you are going to read the greens for them as well.

    Posted:
  • JuniorGolfParentJuniorGolfParent Members  234WRX Points: 139Posts: 234 Fairways
    Joined:  #30

    On -, @iteachgolf said:

    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    My top high school players currently didn’t play golf in middle school.

    Ok now I am intrigued. Were they strong in other sports before starting in golf? Were their parents athletes or play golf competitively? What is it about them that makes them your top students?

    Posted:
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  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members  17191WRX Points: 1,419Posts: 17,191 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Jun 26, 2019 #31

    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    On -, @iteachgolf said:

    On -, @JuniorGolfParent said:

    So top players at a younger age can get distracted or lose interest (burn out?) as they get older - that makes sense.

    But are there many top players in high school who weren’t at least decent players in middle school? I would expect any examples of such would be the exception and definitely not the norm.

    My top high school players currently didn’t play golf in middle school.

    Ok now I am intrigued. Were they strong in other sports before starting in golf? Were their parents athletes or play golf competitively? What is it about them that makes them your top students?

    No their parents don’t play golf. They played other sports but weren’t elite at them. They are the best because they shoot the lowest scores. They work hard, one just won US Jr qualifier by 4.

    They knew they started late, worked hard on the right things, and want to be the best

    Posted:
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