Clubhouse Grille

1684685687689690839

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  • ReasonabilityReasonability Mirror work is a good idea. Members Posts: 8,529 ✭✭
    edited Oct 10, 2018 #20582
    Before going off to sleep-land - visions of holes in one dancing my head - I don't think I've ever told the story of the closest I ever came to a hole-in-one.



    Now I'll spin a tale that's clearly some whacked-out fantasy story for grins now and then. But this is actually how it happened.



    Somewhere around 1985-ish. Must have been the 4th of July cause at least four or five foursomes from my neighborhood managed to all go play. The goal was to get in 18 and come back for a mass cook-out with grills wheeled into a culdesac. Several of the players either had never played or played very rarely. I end up with a a guy from a couple of streets over in my cart. He shows up in this khaki safari shirt. Big pockets in the front, squared off and un-tucked... hiking boots...borrowed sticks...and a hat with the brim pinned up on one side and a big feather in it.



    Yes - I was in the cart with first-time golfer who for all the world was potentially gong to change his name mid-round to Jim of the Jungle.



    For a first timer - he's actually not doing too badly at all. Yea there were the normal first-time whiffs and worm burners but the guy seemed to get the groove of his swing much faster than most. I had to keep biting my tongue to avoid laughing. Not at his game but the mere fact he kept a spare ball in each of the front shirt pockets - which given his general physique left him looking a like bra-burning feminist. But that aside he was doing pretty darn good.



    We get to 17. A par 3. Nothing tricky about it. Short (around 135 yards). We decide Jim hadn't had the honors all day and invite him to hit first. He asks me what club to hit. I say "9 iron is good this time." He holds up his 6 AND his 9 for me to see the soles (and numbers) on both and asks me which one is the 9. I tap the right one and up he goes on to the tee box.



    He whacks it. It flies pretty. Lands about 8 feet short and she sinks in the cup. We all go ape-crap crazy. Jim is in shock. Then it's my turn.



    I wedge on the same line. Hits in about the same spot. It disappears. We were sure it dropped then one of the guys says, "I think it's right behind the pin. Looks like you'll be putting.



    It sure enough was on the back lip. I'm convinced to this day it went it - bounced off the top of his ball - and popped back out.



    The moral of this story MUST be that if you've been trying and not succeeding in getting that first ace.... try burning your bra. .
    A cynic sees the cost of everything
    and the value of nothing.
  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    bscinstnct wrote:



    My definition of the redtail hawk...always plugged in, switched on, vigilant, but very cool at the same time image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

    Full dress uniform:




    When me and wife started goin for walks in Prospect Park, we just noticed the wildlife on the ground. The squirrels, chipmunks.



    Then, some cool birds. Garden variety. But then some cool ones. Warblers. This yellow one especially.



    We get geese nesting.



    But even better.



    Hawks. Number of varieties.



    Our favorites are the blue herons. Total predators. Come in swooping, poised to kill.



    [media=]



    In Brooklyn! Lol ; )



    One day, Ill move into some *real* open skies country.



    That would be nice.


    Herons are fun to watch too, slow but interesting. Their nests can be quite large, look like an eagle nest from a distance, only eagle nests get much larger. Eagle nests can get well over a ton, sometimes 2 tons. 6 to 8 feet across and such. These birds all make fascinating homes...



    Heron nest:

  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    bscinstnct wrote:



    My definition of the redtail hawk...always plugged in, switched on, vigilant, but very cool at the same time image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

    Full dress uniform:




    When me and wife started goin for walks in Prospect Park, we just noticed the wildlife on the ground. The squirrels, chipmunks.



    Then, some cool birds. Garden variety. But then some cool ones. Warblers. This yellow one especially.



    We get geese nesting.



    But even better.



    Hawks. Number of varieties.



    Our favorites are the blue herons. Total predators. Come in swooping, poised to kill.







    In Brooklyn! Lol ; )



    One day, Ill move into some *real* open skies country.



    That would be nice.




    Wildlife is one of our passions, we have many different types on our block. We are in a rural area with a Forrest only 50ft from our back fence. We have many different birds, snakes , goanas, Bush rats that like the chicken food, possums kangaroos, bush turkeys, and in a pond about 40 ft from our back fence with fresh water eel as thick as your arm, one of our neighbours decided to breed barramundi, which is a salt and fresh water fish and they grow very large, good eating. They kept fingerlings in a tub for months, fed them up ready to put into the pond. The day came, the fish were about two inches long so they released them, they lasted about ten seconds, the eels came up and consumed all of them, the other part is no one knew they were there, so now they were catching the ells and selling them. Still plenty in there.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭

    BIG STU wrote:

    Wriggles wrote:


    Best wishes to Mrs. Tol.



    Sixty, I remember the 5 and 10 back then sold fake pineapple hand grenades for 10 cents. They were OD green and made out of plastic, about 3/4 the size of a real one. I had three or four that we threw around playing army.



    I had a small arsenal of military toys back then. Marx company made nice, cheap authentic looking stuff. I recall having a Sharps carbine, M1 rifle, a 45 auto with plastic belt and holster, and a Luger. I believe the Luger and the Sharps both had a cartridge that was metal with an orange plastic projectile which fired from the percussion of a single cap.



    I also had a Mattel snub nose 38 which shot a spring loaded cartridge. Held 6 cartridges, just like a real one. My Uncle Charlie commented that you could rob a bank with one.



    Didn't want any part of army and war, especially when I was drafted.



    When I had the gun shop and antiques dealer for clients, I bought a 1915 Luger pistol from them. Have never fired it, only bought a box of shells on original 9/11. The day I bought it, I showed it to my WW2 veteran Dad, and he exclaimed, "Why the h*** did you buy that?" Still have it, have no desire to fire it, just look at it once in a while.



    Probably, the Luger is the only item I ever bought that has some real collectible value. Some years ago, a guy offered to buy it for twice what I paid for it, sight unseen. I won't sell it, unless financial circumstances would dictate it.



    Cheers!
    You remember you and I talked about that Mattel Dick Tracy .38 on here one night many moons ago. Yeah I had a bunch of Army stuff when I was a kid. One of the old man's cronies owned a Army Navy Surplus store. I had a real Army helmet steel pot with liner and all a Army Backpack , A duty belt with a genuine .45 holster but no real .45 but did have a Marx Toy .45 and a genuine Army hatchet and shovel. Later on I carried my Ruger .22 target pistol in that holster. I even got a real bayonet and sheath too. Had lots of stuff like that. That guy was always bringing me something. Later on after I got drivers license he asked me to help him pick up some jeeps he had dropped at a paint shop. He was also a used car dealer. Went to the local Earl Scheib and those clowns had painted everything gauges steering wheels and all. Needless to say he raised holy ****. Went by there the next day and they had some temps (rent a drunks) scraping that crap off because the manager ( who owned the franchise) fired everyone there.


    Exactly, we had stuff back then that they would freak out over now. I had that shotgun at 12 yrs old and a Bowie knife along with assorted pocket knifes and fishing filet knives. Of course nowadays all that would have to be locked up and could only be used and controlled by certified licensed lethal weapon handlers.




    Even back in the UK we had firearms when I was young, my uncle had a farm and we were always hunting rabbits from around the fields for lunch, the only problem was the lead shot was usually still in the meat when we ate it. Health and safety people would go bananas with what we used to do, funny enough we survived.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • WrigglesWriggles Members Posts: 3,195 ✭✭
    Walked 14 holes yesterday, played terribly. Must be just tired. A bit of rain this morning, by Saturday, highs in the 50's. Contacted the Zippo company the other day, regarding a Zippo zip light case I had, given to me years ago. The Zip light was a regular Zippo lighter case with a flashlight insert, discontinued. I don't know who thinks up the brilliant R&D stuff, but it amazes me that stupid stuff gets into production.



    Anyhow, I got an email back, stating they will put a regular lighter insert in the case, no charge. The case is happily on its way to Bradford, PA. Great company.



    Our course is still hanging on, barely. Didn't think we'd make it this long. The manager said two more members have resigned for next year. We'll see.



    Take care, guys.
  • scomac2002scomac2002 Inside the Starters' Hut Members Posts: 5,507 ✭✭
    Up early this morning. 3:30, I think was when I first awoke. Couldn't get comfortable as I was feeling pretty owly, likely due to yesterday's biking, but maybe also a bit of worry over what might ensue following the viewings should and offer come in. Popped an Advil about 45 minutes ago along with some Voltaren rub on my low back and feeling better now.



    This morning will be the bigger clean-up with tomorrow only requiring a light go over. The beauty of having viewings on consecutive days. Even my schedule is co-operating with appointments on both days around about the time the buyers will be here.







    Lots of wildlife in these parts living next door to a conservation area. Hawks, herons, geese, turkeys, even a vulture made an appearance yesterday afternoon looking for fresh carrion as the lawn service had just finished cutting. He told me that he had gotten quite a few snakes this summer as they were coming in from the adjacent field to sun themselves in the short grass. It was funny he should mention that as I rode by at least two Garter snakes on the rail trail that were out catching a few mid morning rays. I didn't even realize what they were until they moved. I guess I really do need a new eyeglass prescription!
    Your problem is LOFT -- Lack of friggin' talent!
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  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    tolmij wrote:


    BIG STU wrote:

    Wriggles wrote:


    Best wishes to Mrs. Tol.



    Sixty, I remember the 5 and 10 back then sold fake pineapple hand grenades for 10 cents. They were OD green and made out of plastic, about 3/4 the size of a real one. I had three or four that we threw around playing army.



    I had a small arsenal of military toys back then. Marx company made nice, cheap authentic looking stuff. I recall having a Sharps carbine, M1 rifle, a 45 auto with plastic belt and holster, and a Luger. I believe the Luger and the Sharps both had a cartridge that was metal with an orange plastic projectile which fired from the percussion of a single cap.



    I also had a Mattel snub nose 38 which shot a spring loaded cartridge. Held 6 cartridges, just like a real one. My Uncle Charlie commented that you could rob a bank with one.



    Didn't want any part of army and war, especially when I was drafted.



    When I had the gun shop and antiques dealer for clients, I bought a 1915 Luger pistol from them. Have never fired it, only bought a box of shells on original 9/11. The day I bought it, I showed it to my WW2 veteran Dad, and he exclaimed, "Why the h*** did you buy that?" Still have it, have no desire to fire it, just look at it once in a while.



    Probably, the Luger is the only item I ever bought that has some real collectible value. Some years ago, a guy offered to buy it for twice what I paid for it, sight unseen. I won't sell it, unless financial circumstances would dictate it.



    Cheers!
    You remember you and I talked about that Mattel Dick Tracy .38 on here one night many moons ago. Yeah I had a bunch of Army stuff when I was a kid. One of the old man's cronies owned a Army Navy Surplus store. I had a real Army helmet steel pot with liner and all a Army Backpack , A duty belt with a genuine .45 holster but no real .45 but did have a Marx Toy .45 and a genuine Army hatchet and shovel. Later on I carried my Ruger .22 target pistol in that holster. I even got a real bayonet and sheath too. Had lots of stuff like that. That guy was always bringing me something. Later on after I got drivers license he asked me to help him pick up some jeeps he had dropped at a paint shop. He was also a used car dealer. Went to the local Earl Scheib and those clowns had painted everything gauges steering wheels and all. Needless to say he raised holy ****. Went by there the next day and they had some temps (rent a drunks) scraping that crap off because the manager ( who owned the franchise) fired everyone there.


    Exactly, we had stuff back then that they would freak out over now. I had that shotgun at 12 yrs old and a Bowie knife along with assorted pocket knifes and fishing filet knives. Of course nowadays all that would have to be locked up and could only be used and controlled by certified licensed lethal weapon handlers.




    Even back in the UK we had firearms when I was young, my uncle had a farm and we were always hunting rabbits from around the fields for lunch, the only problem was the lead shot was usually still in the meat when we ate it. Health and safety people would go bananas with what we used to do, funny enough we survived.




    Oh my goodness I remember doing that too, like you, surprised we aren't gonners by now.



    Funniest thing I remember when rabbit hunting I think I was 11, on my first 'excursion' with my brother. My grandparents had 120 a acre farm, so of course we took our scout backpacks along with canteens, and lunch and went deep into a field in late November (always within view of the farmhouse), you know, the survival kind where it's you against 'the elements'. Only a couple candy bars each, maybe 300 yards from the house, really rough. Dark, cloudy, late, probably 4:00 PM, anyway, we had a fiberglass bow each, just like the one below, and a bunch of arrows. And we saw the meanest rabbit we had cornered under a bush. So we started shooting it full of arrows until we were out of them. One of us crawled in, and pulled the dead rabbit out, being successful hunters and all, and we carried it back to the house, arrows sticking out. We asked grandma to cook it for us. I still remember her saying "Uhm, this rabbit is frozen, you shot a frozen rabbit, where did you find it?" So, uh, well, we didn't know it was already dead, we just figured we had trapped it under the bush, and it was either the rabbit or us, so we shot it a whole bunch, then it probably froze on the way back, after all, it was about 25* that day, that should have been enough to freeze a rabbit (it now looked more like a porcupine with all the arrows sticking out of it). We figured the arrows helped cool it off some too. She just laughed and made us take it back somewhere. We took it out back of the house, and tried to cover it up- even the dog didn't want it, hahaha..
  • BIG STUBIG STU Members Posts: 11,277 ✭✭
    scomac2002 wrote:


    I feel an oldie groove coming on tonight...



    [media=]



    [media=]
    Yep The Pusher--- Opening song for "Easy Rider" and now that you mentioned it I heard "Vehicle" on the oldie goldies station Tuesday. Both of those songs sure bring back memories
  • BIG STUBIG STU Members Posts: 11,277 ✭✭

    BIG STU wrote:

    Wriggles wrote:


    Best wishes to Mrs. Tol.



    Sixty, I remember the 5 and 10 back then sold fake pineapple hand grenades for 10 cents. They were OD green and made out of plastic, about 3/4 the size of a real one. I had three or four that we threw around playing army.



    I had a small arsenal of military toys back then. Marx company made nice, cheap authentic looking stuff. I recall having a Sharps carbine, M1 rifle, a 45 auto with plastic belt and holster, and a Luger. I believe the Luger and the Sharps both had a cartridge that was metal with an orange plastic projectile which fired from the percussion of a single cap.



    I also had a Mattel snub nose 38 which shot a spring loaded cartridge. Held 6 cartridges, just like a real one. My Uncle Charlie commented that you could rob a bank with one.



    Didn't want any part of army and war, especially when I was drafted.



    When I had the gun shop and antiques dealer for clients, I bought a 1915 Luger pistol from them. Have never fired it, only bought a box of shells on original 9/11. The day I bought it, I showed it to my WW2 veteran Dad, and he exclaimed, "Why the h*** did you buy that?" Still have it, have no desire to fire it, just look at it once in a while.



    Probably, the Luger is the only item I ever bought that has some real collectible value. Some years ago, a guy offered to buy it for twice what I paid for it, sight unseen. I won't sell it, unless financial circumstances would dictate it.



    Cheers!
    You remember you and I talked about that Mattel Dick Tracy .38 on here one night many moons ago. Yeah I had a bunch of Army stuff when I was a kid. One of the old man's cronies owned a Army Navy Surplus store. I had a real Army helmet steel pot with liner and all a Army Backpack , A duty belt with a genuine .45 holster but no real .45 but did have a Marx Toy .45 and a genuine Army hatchet and shovel. Later on I carried my Ruger .22 target pistol in that holster. I even got a real bayonet and sheath too. Had lots of stuff like that. That guy was always bringing me something. Later on after I got drivers license he asked me to help him pick up some jeeps he had dropped at a paint shop. He was also a used car dealer. Went to the local Earl Scheib and those clowns had painted everything gauges steering wheels and all. Needless to say he raised holy ****. Went by there the next day and they had some temps (rent a drunks) scraping that crap off because the manager ( who owned the franchise) fired everyone there.


    Exactly, we had stuff back then that they would freak out over now. I had that shotgun at 12 yrs old and a Bowie knife along with assorted pocket knifes and fishing filet knives. Of course nowadays all that would have to be locked up and could only be used and controlled by certified licensed lethal weapon handlers.
    I had my first shotgun at 13 or so. It was a single shot .410. I got the previous mentioned pistol about the same time. Around our place you could get all kinds of guns then. Heck I had my fist .38 about 15 or so. In fact my old man made me carry it when I ran the driving range at night because the driving range building was at the bottom of the hill a half mile away from the clubhouse and our house. I had to drive my golf cart between the fence and the creek across our 2nd 4th and 5th holes to get to the house and we had all sorts of feral dogs and stuff around there. But you know I was not out of the norm at school because most of they guys my age owned firearms and we talked about them during hunting season. In fact my Assistant Principal was a avid bird hunter and he had bought a couple of bird dogs from my old man. In fact he stopped me in the hall at lunch one day to inquire how I liked the new Browning 20 gauge bird gun I had just traded for. We ended up having a discussion on the merits of the Browning versus his favorite a Remington 1100. Yeah try having those discussions in school this day and time. I would have been kicked out of school and he would have been fired
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    Thoughts and prayers with the residents of New Mexico, devastating for them. Hope no Grillers or relatives are affected.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    Thought the log splitter was finished with for this year, put it away two weeks ago. Saturday it was a nice spring day mid 90s then the weather turned back down to the low 60s. Lit a fire today and I think it will be going for the next week.



    Golf still on the back burner, had the information today for DWs ablation, life will be much easier when that is done.



    Stu, it was a .410 we used to go rabbit hunting, not too much kick for us beginners.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭

    tolmij wrote:


    BIG STU wrote:

    Wriggles wrote:


    Best wishes to Mrs. Tol.



    Sixty, I remember the 5 and 10 back then sold fake pineapple hand grenades for 10 cents. They were OD green and made out of plastic, about 3/4 the size of a real one. I had three or four that we threw around playing army.



    I had a small arsenal of military toys back then. Marx company made nice, cheap authentic looking stuff. I recall having a Sharps carbine, M1 rifle, a 45 auto with plastic belt and holster, and a Luger. I believe the Luger and the Sharps both had a cartridge that was metal with an orange plastic projectile which fired from the percussion of a single cap.



    I also had a Mattel snub nose 38 which shot a spring loaded cartridge. Held 6 cartridges, just like a real one. My Uncle Charlie commented that you could rob a bank with one.



    Didn't want any part of army and war, especially when I was drafted.



    When I had the gun shop and antiques dealer for clients, I bought a 1915 Luger pistol from them. Have never fired it, only bought a box of shells on original 9/11. The day I bought it, I showed it to my WW2 veteran Dad, and he exclaimed, "Why the h*** did you buy that?" Still have it, have no desire to fire it, just look at it once in a while.



    Probably, the Luger is the only item I ever bought that has some real collectible value. Some years ago, a guy offered to buy it for twice what I paid for it, sight unseen. I won't sell it, unless financial circumstances would dictate it.



    Cheers!
    You remember you and I talked about that Mattel Dick Tracy .38 on here one night many moons ago. Yeah I had a bunch of Army stuff when I was a kid. One of the old man's cronies owned a Army Navy Surplus store. I had a real Army helmet steel pot with liner and all a Army Backpack , A duty belt with a genuine .45 holster but no real .45 but did have a Marx Toy .45 and a genuine Army hatchet and shovel. Later on I carried my Ruger .22 target pistol in that holster. I even got a real bayonet and sheath too. Had lots of stuff like that. That guy was always bringing me something. Later on after I got drivers license he asked me to help him pick up some jeeps he had dropped at a paint shop. He was also a used car dealer. Went to the local Earl Scheib and those clowns had painted everything gauges steering wheels and all. Needless to say he raised holy ****. Went by there the next day and they had some temps (rent a drunks) scraping that crap off because the manager ( who owned the franchise) fired everyone there.


    Exactly, we had stuff back then that they would freak out over now. I had that shotgun at 12 yrs old and a Bowie knife along with assorted pocket knifes and fishing filet knives. Of course nowadays all that would have to be locked up and could only be used and controlled by certified licensed lethal weapon handlers.




    Even back in the UK we had firearms when I was young, my uncle had a farm and we were always hunting rabbits from around the fields for lunch, the only problem was the lead shot was usually still in the meat when we ate it. Health and safety people would go bananas with what we used to do, funny enough we survived.




    Oh my goodness I remember doing that too, like you, surprised we aren't gonners by now.



    Funniest thing I remember when rabbit hunting I think I was 11, on my first 'excursion' with my brother. My grandparents had 120 a acre farm, so of course we took our scout backpacks along with canteens, and lunch and went deep into a field in late November (always within view of the farmhouse), you know, the survival kind where it's you against 'the elements'. Only a couple candy bars each, maybe 300 yards from the house, really rough. Dark, cloudy, late, probably 4:00 PM, anyway, we had a fiberglass bow each, just like the one below, and a bunch of arrows. And we saw the meanest rabbit we had cornered under a bush. So we started shooting it full of arrows until we were out of them. One of us crawled in, and pulled the dead rabbit out, being successful hunters and all, and we carried it back to the house, arrows sticking out. We asked grandma to cook it for us. I still remember her saying "Uhm, this rabbit is frozen, you shot a frozen rabbit, where did you find it?" So, uh, well, we didn't know it was already dead, we just figured we had trapped it under the bush, and it was either the rabbit or us, so we shot it a whole bunch, then it probably froze on the way back, after all, it was about 25* that day, that should have been enough to freeze a rabbit (it now looked more like a porcupine with all the arrows sticking out of it). We figured the arrows helped cool it off some too. She just laughed and made us take it back somewhere. We took it out back of the house, and tried to cover it up- even the dog didn't want it, hahaha..




    Your grandma probably took it out of the freezer and placed it there to keep you busy whilst she was doing chores.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    BIG STU wrote:


    BIG STU wrote:

    Wriggles wrote:


    Best wishes to Mrs. Tol.



    Sixty, I remember the 5 and 10 back then sold fake pineapple hand grenades for 10 cents. They were OD green and made out of plastic, about 3/4 the size of a real one. I had three or four that we threw around playing army.



    I had a small arsenal of military toys back then. Marx company made nice, cheap authentic looking stuff. I recall having a Sharps carbine, M1 rifle, a 45 auto with plastic belt and holster, and a Luger. I believe the Luger and the Sharps both had a cartridge that was metal with an orange plastic projectile which fired from the percussion of a single cap.



    I also had a Mattel snub nose 38 which shot a spring loaded cartridge. Held 6 cartridges, just like a real one. My Uncle Charlie commented that you could rob a bank with one.



    Didn't want any part of army and war, especially when I was drafted.



    When I had the gun shop and antiques dealer for clients, I bought a 1915 Luger pistol from them. Have never fired it, only bought a box of shells on original 9/11. The day I bought it, I showed it to my WW2 veteran Dad, and he exclaimed, "Why the h*** did you buy that?" Still have it, have no desire to fire it, just look at it once in a while.



    Probably, the Luger is the only item I ever bought that has some real collectible value. Some years ago, a guy offered to buy it for twice what I paid for it, sight unseen. I won't sell it, unless financial circumstances would dictate it.



    Cheers!
    You remember you and I talked about that Mattel Dick Tracy .38 on here one night many moons ago. Yeah I had a bunch of Army stuff when I was a kid. One of the old man's cronies owned a Army Navy Surplus store. I had a real Army helmet steel pot with liner and all a Army Backpack , A duty belt with a genuine .45 holster but no real .45 but did have a Marx Toy .45 and a genuine Army hatchet and shovel. Later on I carried my Ruger .22 target pistol in that holster. I even got a real bayonet and sheath too. Had lots of stuff like that. That guy was always bringing me something. Later on after I got drivers license he asked me to help him pick up some jeeps he had dropped at a paint shop. He was also a used car dealer. Went to the local Earl Scheib and those clowns had painted everything gauges steering wheels and all. Needless to say he raised holy ****. Went by there the next day and they had some temps (rent a drunks) scraping that crap off because the manager ( who owned the franchise) fired everyone there.


    Exactly, we had stuff back then that they would freak out over now. I had that shotgun at 12 yrs old and a Bowie knife along with assorted pocket knifes and fishing filet knives. Of course nowadays all that would have to be locked up and could only be used and controlled by certified licensed lethal weapon handlers.
    I had my first shotgun at 13 or so. It was a single shot .410. I got the previous mentioned pistol about the same time. Around our place you could get all kinds of guns then. Heck I had my fist .38 about 15 or so. In fact my old man made me carry it when I ran the driving range at night because the driving range building was at the bottom of the hill a half mile away from the clubhouse and our house. I had to drive my golf cart between the fence and the creek across our 2nd 4th and 5th holes to get to the house and we had all sorts of feral dogs and stuff around there. But you know I was not out of the norm at school because most of they guys my age owned firearms and we talked about them during hunting season. In fact my Assistant Principal was a avid bird hunter and he had bought a couple of bird dogs from my old man. In fact he stopped me in the hall at lunch one day to inquire how I liked the new Browning 20 gauge bird gun I had just traded for. We ended up having a discussion on the merits of the Browning versus his favorite a Remington 1100. Yeah try having those discussions in school this day and time. I would have been kicked out of school and he would have been fired


    I think single shots taught you to be a good shooter, you only had one shot pretty much compared to a pump or a semi. We also knew how to take them apart, clean, oil, and keep our guns super clean back then. Make sure there wasn't any tinge of spent gunpowder of rust in the barrel. These are all things that kids just did back then. You looked forward to your next copy of Field & Stream, or your next Shooter's Bible so you could have a wish list. Maybe in the mean time you would read the latest Mad Magazine on a rainy day...These are things most kids nowadays just won't ever do.
  • scomac2002scomac2002 Inside the Starters' Hut Members Posts: 5,507 ✭✭

    BIG STU wrote:


    BIG STU wrote:


    You remember you and I talked about that Mattel Dick Tracy .38 on here one night many moons ago. Yeah I had a bunch of Army stuff when I was a kid. One of the old man's cronies owned a Army Navy Surplus store. I had a real Army helmet steel pot with liner and all a Army Backpack , A duty belt with a genuine .45 holster but no real .45 but did have a Marx Toy .45 and a genuine Army hatchet and shovel. Later on I carried my Ruger .22 target pistol in that holster. I even got a real bayonet and sheath too. Had lots of stuff like that. That guy was always bringing me something. Later on after I got drivers license he asked me to help him pick up some jeeps he had dropped at a paint shop. He was also a used car dealer. Went to the local Earl Scheib and those clowns had painted everything gauges steering wheels and all. Needless to say he raised holy ****. Went by there the next day and they had some temps (rent a drunks) scraping that crap off because the manager ( who owned the franchise) fired everyone there.


    Exactly, we had stuff back then that they would freak out over now. I had that shotgun at 12 yrs old and a Bowie knife along with assorted pocket knifes and fishing filet knives. Of course nowadays all that would have to be locked up and could only be used and controlled by certified licensed lethal weapon handlers.
    I had my first shotgun at 13 or so. It was a single shot .410. I got the previous mentioned pistol about the same time. Around our place you could get all kinds of guns then. Heck I had my fist .38 about 15 or so. In fact my old man made me carry it when I ran the driving range at night because the driving range building was at the bottom of the hill a half mile away from the clubhouse and our house. I had to drive my golf cart between the fence and the creek across our 2nd 4th and 5th holes to get to the house and we had all sorts of feral dogs and stuff around there. But you know I was not out of the norm at school because most of they guys my age owned firearms and we talked about them during hunting season. In fact my Assistant Principal was a avid bird hunter and he had bought a couple of bird dogs from my old man. In fact he stopped me in the hall at lunch one day to inquire how I liked the new Browning 20 gauge bird gun I had just traded for. We ended up having a discussion on the merits of the Browning versus his favorite a Remington 1100. Yeah try having those discussions in school this day and time. I would have been kicked out of school and he would have been fired


    I think single shots taught you to be a good shooter, you only had one shot pretty much compared to a pump or a semi. We also knew how to take them apart, clean, oil, and keep our guns super clean back then. Make sure there wasn't any tinge of spent gunpowder of rust in the barrel. These are all things that kids just did back then. You looked forward to your next copy of Field & Stream, or your next Shooter's Bible so you could have a wish list. Maybe in the mean time you would read the latest Mad Magazine on a rainy day...These are things most kids nowadays just won't ever do.




    I can remember as a kid going over to my cousin's place on the weekends and leafing through the latest issue of Field & Stream or Mad magazine. I always gravitated to the gun advertisements even though at that point I had never fired anything more serious than a pellet gun that my buddy Ross owned. We'd plink tin cans and such; try and shoot a pigeon up in the barn rafters. Give up in frustration and then head back to the creek to see if we could hook a carp or a grass pike. Budding outdoorsmen like most farm kids were back in the day. Conversely, our kids were anything but. we'd do a bit of fishing when we went to the cottage for a summer vacation when they were growing up, but that was the extent of the outdoorsman activity. Hockey and soccer became the preferred outlets of energy.
    Your problem is LOFT -- Lack of friggin' talent!
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  • BIG STUBIG STU Members Posts: 11,277 ✭✭
    Soco-- Growing up literally in the middle of a golf course was fun. Our lake was a big one with plenty places to fish that were not in the line of fire. Of course I had my own golf cart as did the guy whose Dad actually owned the place. In the summer we carried fishing gear along with golf clubs. We would play golf a while stop and fish usually while my cart was charging. He had a brand new EZ-Go and I had a early 60s Sears (no joke) that used batteries salvaged from old sets taken out of the other carts and treated with new acid and VX-6. But still it would not run with his but I also used mine for chores around the course including emptying trash cans and filling the ball washers. I did finally save enough money when I was about 14 or so to buy me a brand new set of batteries. I also kept mine running from salvage parts from the 5 others we had junked. That helped me develop my early mechanic skills. I also had 2 chargers one at the house and 1 at the driving range. I usually charged it when I worked the cart barn on one of those until the last cart came in. Tires I had plenty of because I had all those salvaged from the junked ones. I also learned how to patch a tube tire and later on plug a tubeless tire when those came about.
  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    BIG STU wrote:


    I usually charged it when I worked the cart barn on one of those until the last cart came in. Tires I had plenty of because I had all those salvaged from the junked ones. I also learned how to patch a tube tire and later on plug a tubeless tire when those came about.


    Man I did plenty of that on my first job at the gas station. I never liked the patches, but really liked it when the plugs came out. It was so much easier to just ream that hole out and run a glued plug in there and cut it and check it in the water trough for a leak. Not sure how it's done now, that was the late 60's. Probably improved much more now. I just know I never liked the inner tube tires, except when you could take a tube to the lake image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    I'll bet you truck guys have done some of the stuff I did when I first learned to change oil, either got some hot oil in on your face when you pulled the plug, stripped out a plug, or forgot to tighten the filter enough or some crazy thing...
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    The. most stupid thing I did with a vehicle was drive over a ditch with a large rock in it, result was a medium sized hole in the sump, very quickly ran out of oil.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • billh17billh17 just happy to play Members Posts: 2,867 ✭✭
    Years ago,i exited a vehicle,to "talk" to an individual. Shut the door.....on my thumb....turned to walk away.and jerked against it. When I

    saw what had happened,i thought,OMG,I am going to lose my thumb. I opened the door,and the blood flowed,and the pain started. When

    I felt the pain,I knew I still had it attached....went to ER...bone broke,stitches,hand protector..and a red face for awhile.
    Certified Orginal Member#2
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    To Heck with the USGA
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    billh17 wrote:


    Years ago,i exited a vehicle,to "talk" to an individual. Shut the door.....on my thumb....turned to walk away.and jerked against it. When I

    saw what had happened,i thought,OMG,I am going to lose my thumb. I opened the door,and the blood flowed,and the pain started. When

    I felt the pain,I knew I still had it attached....went to ER...bone broke,stitches,hand protector..and a red face for awhile.




    I did that last year around November, hurts like ****. We were shopping and I was talking to DW not concentrating when I got out of the car, It was late March before my nail fully grew back. No broken bone but plenty of blood and pain. Went to the local pharmacy and they cleaned and dressed it, no stitches, nice scar though.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    Today was supposed to be the first day of moving and cutting all the wood from the tree felling, temp low sixties, and rain forecast all day. Raining now do a nice restful day instead of hard work image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • billh17billh17 just happy to play Members Posts: 2,867 ✭✭
    Tolj,i remember looking at my thumb in the door,and wondering how the door shut all the way with my thumb in there.

    Man..I mean it was closed..and I couldn't believe how flat my thumb was !

    And the pain was as bad as when my cousin and I fell off Mr Jameson's Clydesdale when we snuck out after dark to ride him, lol
    Certified Orginal Member#2
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    To Heck with the USGA
  • Conrad1953Conrad1953 Members Posts: 15,051 ✭✭
    Weather is certainly turning. Nights are getting cold. Daytime highs only into the 60s and low 70s. So glad

    I won't be doing another winter out here on the road. About 3 more weeks and I'm calling it a day.



    Sixty, I've never worked on my trucks. When I owned trucks I just bit the bullet and paid professionals to

    do the work. Whenever you need a truck repair done you have 2 costs to pay; the first is the actual cost

    of the repair and the second is the opportunity cost, i.e., lost income due to down time.



    I found it more economical to pay and get things fixed quickly. When our truck needed a routine service done,

    PM, oil change, etc. I woud just pull into a Speedco and they would do a full PM in about 30 minutes for about

    $100. This back in 2010 and before; when we owned trucks. Don't know what the cost is now.



    When we needed other things done we went to our favorite shops depending on where we were at the time.

    Down time is often more costly than an actual repair cost so time is of the essence when getting things fixed

    on a big truck, whose primary purpose is to provide revenue $$$.
  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    edited Oct 13, 2018 #20605
    billh17 wrote:


    Tolj,i remember looking at my thumb in the door,and wondering how the door shut all the way with my thumb in there.

    Man..I mean it was closed..and I couldn't believe how flat my thumb was !

    And the pain was as bad as when my cousin and I fell off Mr Jameson's Clydesdale when we snuck out after dark to ride him, lol




    Know exactly how you felt, firstly I could not believe I had been so stupid, then came the realisation and the pain. Trying to be careful since then it has almost happened twice again, now I stand back and put my free hand out of the way.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


    A definite geezer of some repute, ( I think ).
  • BIG STUBIG STU Members Posts: 11,277 ✭✭
    Conrad1953 wrote:


    Weather is certainly turning. Nights are getting cold. Daytime highs only into the 60s and low 70s. So glad

    I won't be doing another winter out here on the road. About 3 more weeks and I'm calling it a day.



    Sixty, I've never worked on my trucks. When I owned trucks I just bit the bullet and paid professionals to

    do the work. Whenever you need a truck repair done you have 2 costs to pay; the first is the actual cost

    of the repair and the second is the opportunity cost, i.e., lost income due to down time.



    I found it more economical to pay and get things fixed quickly. When our truck needed a routine service done,

    PM, oil change, etc. I woud just pull into a Speedco and they would do a full PM in about 30 minutes for about

    $100. This back in 2010 and before; when we owned trucks. Don't know what the cost is now.



    When we needed other things done we went to our favorite shops depending on where we were at the time.

    Down time is often more costly than an actual repair cost so time is of the essence when getting things fixed

    on a big truck, whose primary purpose is to provide revenue $$$.
    I was sorta the opposite. I learned to work on them when I owned them. Of course back in those days when I first got started I had older equipment. Back in the days when I got started trucks were easier to work on than they are now. I had one truck I actually built from a wreck. I bought a wrecked 4070 B cab over International from Schneider cheap. Was messing around up in Green Bay and they had crates stacked with complete 4070 B cabs complete brand new. They were in the process at the time of phasing out the 4070s and going with the 9670 and 9700 Cab Overs. I swung a heck of a deal and ended up with 2 cabs and a assortment of parts cheap. Filled up a 48 foot van with parts for $3500. My partner and I had 6 4070 B models at the time so that was a deal. One of the crated cabs turned out to be a Eagle model which was a Cadillac of a cab. Those cabs were turn key. Just set on hook up air lines and steering and clutch lever and the wires plugged in. In fact I did the cab change over by myself in about 4 or 5 hours. I cut the bent cab hinge mounts on the wrecked one and hooked a chain to the wreck and pulled it off. Had a friend of mine bring the big wrecker over and we rigged the new cab and set it on. In the parts stash there was a brand new 13 speed Road Ranger that was more than likely for one of their tanker trucks from the 903 Cummins V-8 days Of course i went through the 350 in that truck with a fine tooth comb and built a 450 out of it. Those days i was not really driving that much I mostly ran the shop and operations. Of course i would slip off about noon or shortly after to play golf or ride the motorcycle. That truck was mostly a winter project. We kept the trucks staggered in at different times on the weekends for maintenance. Not to be misconstrued I worked my butt off on weekends. Took me about a year to build that truck working on it when I felt like it. When I got it finished I was ready to get out of the shop and ops and back on the road again. LOL drove it about 2 years on and off. Sold it and bought it back 2 times over the next 10 years. Last time I owned it I had a guy driving it in the 90s pulling the big pre stress concrete beams up to the DC area. That gig got over and he moved on. That truck sat about a year even though i fired it up a couple of times a month. I was actually at one time going to change the 5th wheel out so I could pull a 40 ft 5th wheel type trailer to haul the race cars in then I sold it the last time to a well drilling guy out of Gaffney to haul his extension booms and drill pipe with. The last time I heard he was still using it even though one of his guys blew the engine and he had put a standard 350 in it
  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    Now that I'm getting ready to retire in March, I'm thinking back about some of the jobs I've had. The first factory job that got me to where I am today as a Quality Manager, we made hydraulic pumps and motors, really good ones. In fact some of them went in tanks for the military. We had this inspector for them who came in and inspected them before we could ship. Dang he was picky, they were superb in every way, but we had to paint them with this white enamel when they were finished. That seemed to be his big beef. If he didn't like the paint job, he would reject them, and walk out, making us do it again threatening to 'shut us down', although he never did. He was always serious, never cracked a smile, kind of like a black version of Sgt. Joe Friday. Finally he retired and came back to visit us, and was all smiles, joking with us and having a good old time reminiscing. He told us how great of suppliers we were & crap, made us feel good. It was nice to see that he was a regular guy after all.
  • scomac2002scomac2002 Inside the Starters' Hut Members Posts: 5,507 ✭✭


    Now that I'm getting ready to retire in March...




    Does that include getting up at 4 am on weekends? image/happy.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':happy:' />







    Had lunch with my buddy, Dave yesterday while I was banished from the house for another showing. He was twisting my arm to go swimming with him on Tuesday and Thursday mornings at the local YMCA. I'm going to give that a try perhaps as early as next week just to see how I handle that. Still feeling the after effects of my bike ride from Wednesday followed by Thursday morning's "housework". I think the vacuum is the worst. We have an old Kenmore canister model that is probably 40 years old and weighs a ton! I told DW that I'm getting a Dyson as a gift to myself; one of the cordless stick vacuums that weighs about 6 lbs. If I'm going to be her house husband then she's going to have to provide me with good equipment! image/pardon.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':pardon:' />
    Your problem is LOFT -- Lack of friggin' talent!
    _____________________________________

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  • tolmijtolmij Living in paradise Members Posts: 3,670 ✭✭
    scomac2002 wrote:



    Now that I'm getting ready to retire in March...




    Does that include getting up at 4 am on weekends? image/happy.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':happy:' />







    Had lunch with my buddy, Dave yesterday while I was banished from the house for another showing. He was twisting my arm to go swimming with him on Tuesday and Thursday mornings at the local YMCA. I'm going to give that a try perhaps as early as next week just to see how I handle that. Still feeling the after effects of my bike ride from Wednesday followed by Thursday morning's "housework". I think the vacuum is the worst. We have an old Kenmore canister model that is probably 40 years old and weighs a ton! I told DW that I'm getting a Dyson as a gift to myself; one of the cordless stick vacuums that weighs about 6 lbs. If I'm going to be her house husband then she's going to have to provide me with good equipment! image/pardon.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':pardon:' />




    Two good points.



    A house husband needs good tools for the jobs he is trusted with. I, note not we, have a Dyson, top gear.



    Swimming is the best all round exersize you will get, DW swims for 1 1/2 hours a week in the spring and summer back pains are very much reduced during these periods.
    Way down under in (not New Orleans) Australia.

    Living the dream.

    OGA Member no #8

    Kindly donated by mdgboxx and worn with pride


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  • SixtySomePingSixtySomePing Members Posts: 5,106 ✭✭
    scomac2002 wrote:



    Now that I'm getting ready to retire in March...




    Does that include getting up at 4 am on weekends? image/happy.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':happy:' />




    Yes because I'll still have to clock in, in order to get benefits image/taunt.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':taunt:' /> Actually I will get up with my DW because her retirement is still a few years away. So I'll want to see her in the morning. Then probably go back to bed before I begin my important work day.... do whatever retired people do.... I know that one of the big jobs I have lined up already since I'm retiring at the end of March, and I've been putting this off since I've been working, and it really is a 4 day job, but I'm planning to take 4 days starting probably around- well, I guess I'll wait till the end of the second week I'm off, maybe towards the end, say starting Thursday April 11th, and watch what is called The Masters Tournament on TV. It's a golf tournament, pretty popular, comes from Augusta. So, I know it will be a struggle, but hey, I think I can do it. Dang, retirement, I knew I'd get busy right away.... image/golfer.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':golfer:' />
  • Conrad1953Conrad1953 Members Posts: 15,051 ✭✭

    scomac2002 wrote:



    Now that I'm getting ready to retire in March...




    Does that include getting up at 4 am on weekends? image/happy.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':happy:' />




    Yes because I'll still have to clock in, in order to get benefits image/taunt.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':taunt:' /> Actually I will get up with my DW because her retirement is still a few years away. So I'll want to see her in the morning. Then probably go back to bed before I begin my important work day.... do whatever retired people do.... I know that one of the big jobs I have lined up already since I'm retiring at the end of March, and I've been putting this off since I've been working, and it really is a 4 day job, but I'm planning to take 4 days starting probably around- well, I guess I'll wait till the end of the second week I'm off, maybe towards the end, say starting Thursday April 11th, and watch what is called The Masters Tournament on TV. It's a golf tournament, pretty popular, comes from Augusta. So, I know it will be a struggle, but hey, I think I can do it. Dang, retirement, I knew I'd get busy right away.... image/golfer.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':golfer:' />




    Yep, life is going to be rough in retirement. I re-engaged with our cable company and signed up for

    Spectrum internet TV; at a much reduced price than what the "cable" tv was costing us. They came

    out and gave us a new upgraded wireless modem too. Of course, it all comes into the house via

    cable, lol.



    One of the benefits of going this route is no more of this paying extra for more TVs,or paying extra

    for DVR features, pausing live TV, no HD boxes, etc. We already have our Roku system so

    we can connect to the Spectrum TV using that system. Things are certainly changing for the better.

    When consumers start voting with their feet these companies begin to pay attention and make

    changes.



    So, now I'll be watching The Master's with you Sixty.



    Now I can watch golf again, football.....all the channels I had before plus many more....for far less

    that what we were paying before.
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