Aha Moment--Loading Lag/Float Loading

scopekscopek Members Posts: 515
edited May 15, 2018 in Instruction & Academy #1
Hi.



I have rarely had any "aha" or true break through moments. However, I may have stumbled on something that I *think* might really help. I've always been told that float loading the club to gain lag was a no, no and should be avoided because it requires a lot of timing and is difficult to manage. I've also heard and read everything from the idea of "holding lag as long as possible" to "you should NOT hold lag and start a smooth release from the top." As an amateur trying to learn how to have a decent swing, it's mind blowing confusing with all the contradictions. For the first time I started playing around with idea of keeping my wrist soft on the back swing as if I'm dragging the club and then changing directions on the downswing getting that fly fishing or whip type of feel. When I do this, I feel like I "load" the club and then just whip my hands and let it go and release naturally past the ball. It kinda reminds me of what Dufner looks to be doing in his swing. Now I've only been doing 9 to 3's with this but, WOW! Everything started to make sense...I was starting to take divots in front of the ball, I was maintaining and "holding" lag, and my strikes started having that nice "thud" sound. It's early, but I think this is going to work for me. The weird part is, is that i'm not trying to hold lag nor I'm I trying to manipulate anything.



So my question to the forum is: Am I the only one out there that is finding this to work? I know I could get tons of posts on why I shouldn't do this and I have no doubt this wouldn't work for everyone, but I'm curious who finds this helpful. For myself, it really makes a lot of sense on what lag is and that it's not about "holding" lag but using a natural motion in the swing that will create it as a result of another movement so it can then be released at the correct time. I think Bobby Clampett said something about "loading the lag"...That finally makes sense. Thoughts?
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Comments

  • ferrispgmferrispgm Members Posts: 1,907 ✭✭
    The issue is that, sure it will work for a little bit but eventually it's not the way to go. Plus, having a large amount of shaft lean makes distance control and trajectory/spin control difficult. The TGM/Bobby Clampett way is to load the lag and maintain that loaded feeling into impact. I did it for a while and after a month my game went downhill fast. i would hit some great shots, but then a bunch off the planet bad.



    If you have a decent backswing and a good transition you will automatically achieve your natural amount of lag. Ask yourself this....What is easier to repeat consistently? A natural motion or something forced?
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  • scopekscopek Members Posts: 515
    ferrispgm wrote:


    The issue is that, sure it will work for a little bit but eventually it's not the way to go. Plus, having a large amount of shaft lean makes distance control and trajectory/spin control difficult. The TGM/Bobby Clampett way is to load the lag and maintain that loaded feeling into impact. I did it for a while and after a month my game went downhill fast. i would hit some great shots, but then a bunch off the planet bad.



    If you have a decent backswing and a good transition you will automatically achieve your natural amount of lag. Ask yourself this....What is easier to repeat consistently? A natural motion or something forced?




    Well, that's the thing...For me this feels more natural. I've been struggling for years trying to either do the concept of release from the top (ala Jim Hardy) or holding the lag. This seems like it does both...I'm not trying to hold anything, it's just occur naturally. I can see how it would be easy to loose the feel, though, over time. But I'm going to keep at it.
  • sheldonjhackersheldonjhacker Members Posts: 3,700 ✭✭
    I would love to hear what people think of Clampett's ideas for the swing.
  • sheldonjhackersheldonjhacker Members Posts: 3,700 ✭✭
    ferrispgm wrote:


    The issue is that, sure it will work for a little bit but eventually it's not the way to go. Plus, having a large amount of shaft lean makes distance control and trajectory/spin control difficult. The TGM/Bobby Clampett way is to load the lag and maintain that loaded feeling into impact. I did it for a while and after a month my game went downhill fast. i would hit some great shots, but then a bunch off the planet bad.



    If you have a decent backswing and a good transition you will automatically achieve your natural amount of lag. Ask yourself this....What is easier to repeat consistently? A natural motion or something forced?


    So...what do you do that the OP should be doing? Not the Clampett stuff? Thanks
  • ferrispgmferrispgm Members Posts: 1,907 ✭✭

    ferrispgm wrote:


    The issue is that, sure it will work for a little bit but eventually it's not the way to go. Plus, having a large amount of shaft lean makes distance control and trajectory/spin control difficult. The TGM/Bobby Clampett way is to load the lag and maintain that loaded feeling into impact. I did it for a while and after a month my game went downhill fast. i would hit some great shots, but then a bunch off the planet bad.



    If you have a decent backswing and a good transition you will automatically achieve your natural amount of lag. Ask yourself this....What is easier to repeat consistently? A natural motion or something forced?


    So...what do you do that the OP should be doing? Not the Clampett stuff? Thanks




    I tried the "impact zone" stuff and also worked with a TGM instructor for a while. Again, it worked short term somewhat but my bad rounds were awful. I have started now working on just making my swing/body movements better and letting impact basically sort itself out. Impact is a result of everything that comes before it...not a static position. I won't get the lag of Sergio but who cares as long as I'm hitting it consistently and on a good trajectory.
    Driver: Callaway Epic 9* w/ Graphite Design Tour AD M9003
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    58*: Cleveland CG14 1 dot
    Putter: Taylormade Daytona Rossa with agsi.
  • glkglk send it in jerome Members Posts: 3,319 ✭✭
    If you work float loading into your swing (as opposed to having natural degree of a float load in the downswing - Sergio, Lucas Glover) then you have to have two swings - one for full swings then one for your short game - controlling distance and trajectory in the short game while float loading . . . Love to see a high lob float load over a bunker to a tight pin, or float load a bunker swing, or consistently hit a wedge 60 yards, the list goes on. And if your swing without float loading is out of synch then it can be a real disaster when adding a float load.



    All that said, float loaded last night. Costco vanilla and Sprecher's root beer. Highly recommended.
  • NotForeLongNotForeLong Banned Posts: 139
    First, the reason that there is so much seemingly conflicting information is that most people who are “teachers” especially on the inter webs, have no idea what they are talking about. There are some really good teachers who post here, but they are in a small minority. You’d do much better to assume any and everything you see on like YouTube is wrong unless you have good information on the specific instructor that convinces you otherwise.



    As for the swing, I think it’s fair to say at the beginning that none of us have a clue what is really going given how little information we have. Have you looked at your swing on video to confirm you are actually doing what you are saying? If so, why not just post the video? If you haven’t, then there is no way for you, and especially anyone else, to have any idea if you are doing what you think you are.



    If you are doing what you are describing (and that’s a big if), you are almost certainly gonna get super steep. Have you tried hitting like full 5 irons doing this? Because on half swings and with wedges, if you get steep, it’s very likely to feel like you are hitting it better and even farther. But then as you go up the bag it’s going to turn into a disaster. So I think it would be a good idea to go through the whole bag very soon to see if the results are similar. If you do get results, then what else is there to say other than to keep doing it if you are hitting it better? If you aren’t seeing as good of results as you go up the bag, then you are very likely super steep and I doubt there’s much anyone can do to help you without seeing your swing.
  • cardoustiecardoustie haha, we don't play for 5's Members Posts: 11,860 ✭✭
    Op ... you're onto something



    I overly float load. Great for low growling chips though



    I went to a few key thoughts 2 years back and my ball-striking improved dramatically



    Release hands/angles ... from the top.

    Release right shoulder (watch Tom Watson discover the secret for him)

    Stay tall thru the shot



    Currently continue working on "descending" into tee ball w driver and I can't hook it. It's a wild feeling



    FWIW .... I used to be a guy stuck on his rear foot with too much spine tilt and holding onto lag for dear life
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  • scopekscopek Members Posts: 515
    edited May 15, 2018 #10


    First, the reason that there is so much seemingly conflicting information is that most people who are "teachers" especially on the inter webs, have no idea what they are talking about. There are some really good teachers who post here, but they are in a small minority. You'd do much better to assume any and everything you see on like YouTube is wrong unless you have good information on the specific instructor that convinces you otherwise.



    As for the swing, I think it's fair to say at the beginning that none of us have a clue what is really going given how little information we have. Have you looked at your swing on video to confirm you are actually doing what you are saying? If so, why not just post the video? If you haven't, then there is no way for you, and especially anyone else, to have any idea if you are doing what you think you are.



    If you are doing what you are describing (and that's a big if), you are almost certainly gonna get super steep. Have you tried hitting like full 5 irons doing this? Because on half swings and with wedges, if you get steep, it's very likely to feel like you are hitting it better and even farther. But then as you go up the bag it's going to turn into a disaster. So I think it would be a good idea to go through the whole bag very soon to see if the results are similar. If you do get results, then what else is there to say other than to keep doing it if you are hitting it better? If you aren't seeing as good of results as you go up the bag, then you are very likely super steep and I doubt there's much anyone can do to help you without seeing your swing.




    Thanks for the reply Those are great points. Yes, I have seen my swing on video (I"m always reviewing video) and am a pretty good flat left wrist at impact and good lag. I've been going through my irons from the gap wedge to my 5iron pretty well with the 9 to 3 swings. I haven't tried it with anything above a 5iron. I've also been working a LOT on other things like my foot work and weight shift and being in a decent axis tilt at impact, so those things are also likely helping here. Another thing that might really be at play here is that I think I've had a habit of having a death grip. I wonder if part of the improvement is that I'm relaxing my wrists and this is allowing a more natural release? I have an instructor a at a golftec that I'll be seeing next week so I'll see what he has to say.
  • TroTro Members Posts: 67
    edited May 15, 2018 #11
    scopek wrote:



    First, the reason that there is so much seemingly conflicting information is that most people who are "teachers" especially on the inter webs, have no idea what they are talking about. There are some really good teachers who post here, but they are in a small minority. You'd do much better to assume any and everything you see on like YouTube is wrong unless you have good information on the specific instructor that convinces you otherwise.



    As for the swing, I think it's fair to say at the beginning that none of us have a clue what is really going given how little information we have. Have you looked at your swing on video to confirm you are actually doing what you are saying? If so, why not just post the video? If you haven't, then there is no way for you, and especially anyone else, to have any idea if you are doing what you think you are.



    If you are doing what you are describing (and that's a big if), you are almost certainly gonna get super steep. Have you tried hitting like full 5 irons doing this? Because on half swings and with wedges, if you get steep, it's very likely to feel like you are hitting it better and even farther. But then as you go up the bag it's going to turn into a disaster. So I think it would be a good idea to go through the whole bag very soon to see if the results are similar. If you do get results, then what else is there to say other than to keep doing it if you are hitting it better? If you aren't seeing as good of results as you go up the bag, then you are very likely super steep and I doubt there's much anyone can do to help you without seeing your swing.




    Thanks for the reply Those are great points. Yes, I have seen my swing on video (I"m always reviewing video) and am a pretty good flat left wrist at impact and good lag. I've been going through my irons from the gap wedge to my 5iron pretty well with the 9 to 3 swings. I haven't tried it with anything above a 5iron. I've also been working a LOT on other things like my foot work and weight shift and being in a decent axis tilt at impact, so those things are also likely helping here. Another thing that might really be at play here is that I think I've had a habit of having a death grip. I wonder if part of the improvement is that I'm relaxing my wrists and this is allowing a more natural release? I have an instructor a at a golftec that I'll be seeing next week so I'll see what he has to say.




    I think you're onto something here. I too have found that if I relax my wrists, my club shallows, and allows a better strike. Float load may not even be the right term for what you are doing - anything that implies the "L" word gest people into a frenzy. But if you are relaxing for wrists, and flexing (bowing) into impact, you are probably fine. If you see a massive cup in you lead wrist from down the line, "proceed with caution".
  • Nard_SNard_S Members Posts: 3,220 ✭✭
    I always had a late wrist set, then float loaded to fully **** but had to fix this because it caused a lot of issues at the top, transition and impact. So from things there got tricky. If I'm too keen on holding wrist angles I rob myself, if I fire and release from the top it goes better but it's not optimal either. The best way I get things right is a combo of fire from the top, pull through elbows and create a float load where feel or intent is wrists are leading the hands into the ball. Takes the body and arms to do their job right but results are impressive.
  • MonteScheinblumMonteScheinblum Rebellion Golf Sponsors Posts: 18,240 ✭✭
    Tro wrote:

    scopek wrote:



    First, the reason that there is so much seemingly conflicting information is that most people who are "teachers" especially on the inter webs, have no idea what they are talking about. There are some really good teachers who post here, but they are in a small minority. You'd do much better to assume any and everything you see on like YouTube is wrong unless you have good information on the specific instructor that convinces you otherwise.



    As for the swing, I think it's fair to say at the beginning that none of us have a clue what is really going given how little information we have. Have you looked at your swing on video to confirm you are actually doing what you are saying? If so, why not just post the video? If you haven't, then there is no way for you, and especially anyone else, to have any idea if you are doing what you think you are.



    If you are doing what you are describing (and that's a big if), you are almost certainly gonna get super steep. Have you tried hitting like full 5 irons doing this? Because on half swings and with wedges, if you get steep, it's very likely to feel like you are hitting it better and even farther. But then as you go up the bag it's going to turn into a disaster. So I think it would be a good idea to go through the whole bag very soon to see if the results are similar. If you do get results, then what else is there to say other than to keep doing it if you are hitting it better? If you aren't seeing as good of results as you go up the bag, then you are very likely super steep and I doubt there's much anyone can do to help you without seeing your swing.




    Thanks for the reply Those are great points. Yes, I have seen my swing on video (I"m always reviewing video) and am a pretty good flat left wrist at impact and good lag. I've been going through my irons from the gap wedge to my 5iron pretty well with the 9 to 3 swings. I haven't tried it with anything above a 5iron. I've also been working a LOT on other things like my foot work and weight shift and being in a decent axis tilt at impact, so those things are also likely helping here. Another thing that might really be at play here is that I think I've had a habit of having a death grip. I wonder if part of the improvement is that I'm relaxing my wrists and this is allowing a more natural release? I have an instructor a at a golftec that I'll be seeing next week so I'll see what he has to say.




    I think you're onto something here. I too have found that if I relax my wrists, my club shallows, and allows a better strike. Float load may not even be the right term for what you are doing - anything that implies the "L" word gest people into a frenzy. But if you are relaxing for wrists, and flexing (bowing) into impact, you are probably fine. If you see a massive cup in you lead wrist from down the line, "proceed with caution".




    You are aware that only one guy on the pga tour is bowing (flexing) into impact?
  • MonteScheinblumMonteScheinblum Rebellion Golf Sponsors Posts: 18,240 ✭✭
    My experience is if golfers would just improve their swings and not search for magic moves, they get better long term.
  • Jim WaldronJim Waldron Balance Point Golf Schools Sponsors Posts: 3,214 ✭✭
    edited May 15, 2018 #15
    scopek wrote:


    Hi.



    I have rarely had any "aha" or true break through moments. However, I may have stumbled on something that I *think* might really help. I've always been told that float loading the club to gain lag was a no, no and should be avoided because it requires a lot of timing and is difficult to manage. I've also heard and read everything from the idea of "holding lag as long as possible" to "you should NOT hold lag and start a smooth release from the top." As an amateur trying to learn how to have a decent swing, it's mind blowing confusing with all the contradictions. For the first time I started playing around with idea of keeping my wrist soft on the back swing as if I'm dragging the club and then changing directions on the downswing getting that fly fishing or whip type of feel. When I do this, I feel like I "load" the club and then just whip my hands and let it go and release naturally past the ball. It kinda reminds me of what Dufner looks to be doing in his swing. Now I've only been doing 9 to 3's with this but, WOW! Everything started to make sense...I was starting to take divots in front of the ball, I was maintaining and "holding" lag, and my strikes started having that nice "thud" sound. It's early, but I think this is going to work for me. The weird part is, is that i'm not trying to hold lag nor I'm I trying to manipulate anything.



    So my question to the forum is: Am I the only one out there that is finding this to work? I know I could get tons of posts on why I shouldn't do this and I have no doubt this wouldn't work for everyone, but I'm curious who finds this helpful. For myself, it really makes a lot of sense on what lag is and that it's not about "holding" lag but using a natural motion in the swing that will create it as a result of another movement so it can then be released at the correct time. I think Bobby Clampett said something about "loading the lag"...That finally makes sense. Thoughts?




    First thing is - how do you know you are actually "float-loading"? Very easy to conflate a feel or an intention for something that is not actually happening.

    Second - if you have verified you are really doing this, and hitting it much better, you would be nuts to stop doing it.



    One of Main Rules in golf swing improvement is don''t stop doing something if it is really working well.



    "Holding the Lag" is just an exaggeration intention/drill for folks who are actively throwing the wrist angles away. Not a fundamental because if you actually did "hold" onto it, you would be way late for Release and lose ch speed.



    And "releasing from the top" is just an exaggeration drill for folks who steer, and block their Release.



    Also not a fundamental.



    Fundamental of Lag is to do nothing to throw it away and do nothing to hold onto it.



    Just Pivot Thrust properly and at the right point in time in the forward swing and the angles will release fine.



    Kind of sounds like you stumbled upon this "doing nothing" idea.
  • GarpGarp Members Posts: 44
    edited May 15, 2018 #16
    scopek wrote:


    Hi.



    I have rarely had any "aha" or true break through moments. However, I may have stumbled on something that I *think* might really help. I've always been told that float loading the club to gain lag was a no, no and should be avoided because it requires a lot of timing and is difficult to manage. I've also heard and read everything from the idea of "holding lag as long as possible" to "you should NOT hold lag and start a smooth release from the top." As an amateur trying to learn how to have a decent swing, it's mind blowing confusing with all the contradictions. For the first time I started playing around with idea of keeping my wrist soft on the back swing as if I'm dragging the club and then changing directions on the downswing getting that fly fishing or whip type of feel. When I do this, I feel like I "load" the club and then just whip my hands and let it go and release naturally past the ball. It kinda reminds me of what Dufner looks to be doing in his swing. Now I've only been doing 9 to 3's with this but, WOW! Everything started to make sense...I was starting to take divots in front of the ball, I was maintaining and "holding" lag, and my strikes started having that nice "thud" sound. It's early, but I think this is going to work for me. The weird part is, is that i'm not trying to hold lag nor I'm I trying to manipulate anything.



    So my question to the forum is: Am I the only one out there that is finding this to work? I know I could get tons of posts on why I shouldn't do this and I have no doubt this wouldn't work for everyone, but I'm curious who finds this helpful. For myself, it really makes a lot of sense on what lag is and that it's not about "holding" lag but using a natural motion in the swing that will create it as a result of another movement so it can then be released at the correct time. I think Bobby Clampett said something about "loading the lag"...That finally makes sense. Thoughts?




    Very timely post. I came across this video which deals with exactly this and I thought the instructor did a very good job at explaining the motion.



    https://youtu.be/sqTgJq3ZIFE
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • ferrispgmferrispgm Members Posts: 1,907 ✭✭
    There is a reason you don't see anyone on tour sitting on the range working on increasing their lag. It's not a consistent way to hit the ball. You will struggle with clubface control, and club/turf contact. Heck, there are some pros, ala Sergo, who are working to reduce their lag. I ask you all this....What is more likely? Young future tour pros sitting there on the range working on increasing their lag by holding angles and float loading...Or they learned to develop a repeatable swing and the lag was a by product?



    I will tell you this.....I would much rather play for big money against someone I see working on float loading/holding lag than someone who flips every shot.
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  • NXTNXT Banned Posts: 32
    Take it back any way you like, then do this:



    [media=]



    An easy way to eliminate confusion and contradiction.
  • DoppelgangerDoppelganger Members Posts: 834
    Honestly though when I started getting more into speed I noticed a lot of positive things in my hands and on my launch monitor. Just as a mental thing I like to think of reducing my hands mass to 0 and forgetting about power... sounds weird but what my brain interprets as "powerful" resulted in a lot of restrictive physical actions. I started feeling both sides of my body working together and got a lot better looking at impact. Of course this was after professional instruction and loads of practice but adding speed to the hands set off a lot of light bulbs for me personally.
  • Chase Cooper GolfChase Cooper Golf Members Posts: 2,332 ✭✭
    ferrispgm wrote:


    There is a reason you don't see anyone on tour sitting on the range working on increasing their lag. It's not a consistent way to hit the ball. You will struggle with clubface control, and club/turf contact. Heck, there are some pros, ala Sergo, who are working to reduce their lag. I ask you all this....What is more likely? Young future tour pros sitting there on the range working on increasing their lag by holding angles and float loading...Or they learned to develop a repeatable swing and the lag was a by product?



    I will tell you this.....I would much rather play for big money against someone I see working on float loading/holding lag than someone who flips every shot.




    Good stuff here.
    Lots of Callaway Stuff
  • LlortamaiseyLlortamaisey Members Posts: 5,902 ✭✭
    The more I lag, the more I flip at the last second.
  • wmblake2000wmblake2000 Members Posts: 5,710 ✭✭
    The simpler I can make transition, the better.
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  • Golf nerdGolf nerd Members Posts: 942
    edited May 16, 2018 #24
    I would suggest that you go on with your float load action and make your own experiences. Sometimes it is better to do what you currently do to gain more knowledge and also it may be useful in your current stage of your swing. There are stages like in Martial Arts and probably you need to work on float loading to move forward to the next level.

    I remember that Tiger under Foley released his Driver so late that he couldn't control the release and his ball sprayed everywhere. Another comment here in this thread said that he flips at the last moment the more he lags. All these people have gone down that road already and talk about their experience. Monte hates lagging so much, because it costs him control of trajectory and shot length. Seems to be a two edged sword this float loading. Its a good thing to experience imo and helps to understand the Golf swing better.



    Edit: Just a side note. Dana Dahlquist currently teaches a swing where his students have to release the club from the top to shallow the shaft and to flatten out the angle of attack. They come from inside without moving the body backwards (tilt away from target), but turn their bodies left while keeping the two imaginary swing centers more on top of each other.

    One can release the angle between the left forearm and the shaft while maintaining the right wrist angle, which leads to shaft lean at impact. Notice that the right wrist angle is more important to shaft lean as the left radial (upward wrist ****) wrist angle. Float loading increases the left radial wrist **** and not so much the right wrist bend. I would call float loading the old way of creating visual lag. But it often makes the shaft steep in transition, which needs a compensation (EE or rightward tilt) to flatten the angle of attack.
  • baudibaudi Members Posts: 643 ✭✭
    edited May 16, 2018 #25
    A teaching pro whom I highly regard of, is not rigidly against float loading if it is a natural part in your swing.

    But he had this question pending:
    Try and hit a chip, pitch, 1/2 or 3/4 shot while float loading. That being the case, do you really want two completely different golf swings you have to master?




    The rebellious answer to me is yes. I want to own at least 50 swings serving as an application for all sorts of different shots. All be these variations to a theme the grip, setup and swing are somehow different.



    In high soft green side bunker shots, 30 yard shots from deep rough lob shots 'float loading' was always part of my act.

    These techniques are completely different from my 'normal' iron shots in which I strive for an early full wrist set with fore arm cross over.



    This winter I took notice from an English pro Stewart Smith who teaches a drag and flail for various chip shots.

    I started to practice his ideas and gained 3 new shots which are extremely effective.
  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,167 ✭✭
    One of the challenges in this is maintaining soft/supple wrists while still holding onto the club firmly enough with your hands. If the butt end of the club gets to moving around in your left hand either in transition or through impact and you notice a wear pattern on the heel pad of your glove, your in trouble.
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  • scopekscopek Members Posts: 515
    Garp wrote:




    Very timely post. I came across this video which deals with exactly this and I thought the instructor did a very good job at explaining the motion.



    https://youtu.be/sqTgJq3ZIFE




    Yes! This is exactly what I "discovered." I've been trying to do what he says in holding the lag and it hasn't worked. This makes so much more sense and he explains it well.
    ferrispgm wrote:


    There is a reason you don't see anyone on tour sitting on the range working on increasing their lag. It's not a consistent way to hit the ball. You will struggle with clubface control, and club/turf contact. Heck, there are some pros, ala Sergo, who are working to reduce their lag. I ask you all this....What is more likely? Young future tour pros sitting there on the range working on increasing their lag by holding angles and float loading...Or they learned to develop a repeatable swing and the lag was a by product?



    I will tell you this.....I would much rather play for big money against someone I see working on float loading/holding lag than someone who flips every shot.




    I appreciate your comments, but I think you missed the point of my OP or didn't really read it. I said, or was at least trying to say, that the entire "aha" moment was that I found keeping my wrists soft/relaxed with a sort of fly fishing/whip action resulted in myself NOT trying to hold lag but ends up giving me lag. I said that in the past I have tried to hold the lag and it never worked.


    Golf nerd wrote:


    I would suggest that you go on with your float load action and make your own experiences. Sometimes it is better to do what you currently do to gain more knowledge and also it may be useful in your current stage of your swing. There are stages like in Martial Arts and probably you need to work on float loading to move forward to the next level.

    I remember that Tiger under Foley released his Driver so late that he couldn't control the release and his ball sprayed everywhere. Another comment here in this thread said that he flips at the last moment the more he lags. All these people have gone down that road already and talk about their experience. Monte hates lagging so much, because it costs him control of trajectory and shot length. Seems to be a two edged sword this float loading. Its a good thing to experience imo and helps to understand the Golf swing better.



    Edit: Just a side note. Dana Dahlquist currently teaches a swing where his students have to release the club from the top to shallow the shaft and to flatten out the angle of attack. They come from inside without moving the body backwards (tilt away from target), but turn their bodies left while keeping the two imaginary swing centers more on top of each other.

    One can release the angle between the left forearm and the shaft while maintaining the right wrist angle, which leads to shaft lean at impact. Notice that the right wrist angle is more important to shaft lean as the left radial (upward wrist ****) wrist angle. Float loading increases the left radial wrist **** and not so much the right wrist bend. I would call float loading the old way of creating visual lag. But it often makes the shaft steep in transition, which needs a compensation (EE or rightward tilt) to flatten the angle of attack.




    Thanks. Great post.


    dpb5031 wrote:


    One of the challenges in this is maintaining soft/supple wrists while still holding onto the club firmly enough with your hands. If the butt end of the club gets to moving around in your left hand either in transition or through impact and you notice a wear pattern on the heel pad of your glove, your in trouble.




    Yes, that's going to be the challenge and something I'll need to keep working on. I have a tendency to grip way too hard resulting in tightening my wrist angles too much. Doing this drill has also challenged me to make sure I have a proper grip because it definitely exposed when I wasn't properly holding the club.
  • GolfbeatGolfbeat Swing Lessee Members Posts: 1,657 ✭✭
    Scopek, you mean this?



  • Swisstrader98Swisstrader98 Members Posts: 3,521 ✭✭
    Come talk to us after youve done more than half or three quarter swings or played a few rounds with your new move:)



    On a more serious note, if one simple magic move were the fix for anyone of us, we’d all be on tour.
  • scopekscopek Members Posts: 515
    edited May 16, 2018 #30
    Golfbeat wrote:


    Scopek, you mean this?



    [media=]




    Yes! That's exactly it.




    Come talk to us after youve done more than half or three quarter swings or played a few rounds with your new move:)



    On a more serious note, if one simple magic move were the fix for anyone of us, we'd all be on tour.




    Sure, getting it to a full swing will take practice and maybe I'll change my tune later. But who said anything about a "magic move" or "the fix"? I simply stated that this is something that has helped me in my swing and helped clarify a lot especially in terms of how to generate lag. Why do people get their panties in a bunch when someone stumbles on something that helps them? I also specifically said in my OP that I understand this is probably not for everyone and also said later in my posts that I'm also working on a lot of other things like my foot work that is probably helping a lot as well. Am I the only one who has ever had moments in their hard work where something clicked?
  • GolfbeatGolfbeat Swing Lessee Members Posts: 1,657 ✭✭
    I always thought that lag was created by keeping the wrists hinged up. Now, I understand that lag is created by having the wrists actually unhinge early whilst trying to keep the flex in the right wrist/and bow in left wrist as long as possible (or at least try to keep it past impact. Obviously, this needs to be done with the body rotating through all the way.

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