Played a Private Course And Regret It

13

Comments

  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    It's sort of circular to say "you can't justify the expense unless you're willing to spend it". I'm not sure what that means other than don't buy something you can't afford.



    Playing at the nicest golf course in town which happens to be private costs a lot more than playing a cheap-but-cheerful muni right down the road. Whether you figure it per month, per year, per round, whatever. It costs more but it is also better quality.



    Joining a private golf club for some people is about making business contacts or finding an instant social network or rubbing shoulders with people from their same social stratum. But it can also be about a golfer wanting to play golf at that particular course with those particular other golfers. Nothing to be ashamed of there, you're not a lesser member if you're there for the golf than if you bring along a non-golfing spouse and three non-golfing kids and want to join the social scene.



    It's typically pretty expensive relative to the alternatives. Just like eating a steak is more expensive than eating hamburger or raman noodles. But there's no special financial calculus involved. It costs what it costs, the quality is what it is, you just make up your mind and pay if it's worth it to you for whatever reason(s).
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • zoned_post_meridiemzoned_post_meridiem Members Posts: 95 ✭✭✭
    edited Aug 28, 2018 #63


    But it can also be about a golfer wanting to play golf at that particular course with those particular other golfers. Nothing to be ashamed of there, you're not a lesser member if you're there for the golf than if you bring along a non-golfing spouse and three non-golfing kids and want to join the social scene.






    That's a great point. My hesitation to joining one is precisely this ... I'd join for the quality of the course/golf-related amenities, but don't really care about the social scene. In a place with 10+ months of golf, I'd go for it and just skip most of the social stuff. But up here, there's little *but* social events for about 5.5 months.
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Without knowing you or your family and friends, I'd give the generic advice that if you really want to join because of the golf in a 6-month golf climate then be careful not to try to convince yourself by thinking "But there's also the social benefits...."



    We can all get carried away by wanting something so we mentally search around for extra "reasons" we ought to get it! Been there, done that.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • radimanradiman Members Posts: 4,724 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭


    Without knowing you or your family and friends, I'd give the generic advice that if you really want to join because of the golf in a 6-month golf climate then be careful not to try to convince yourself by thinking "But there's also the social benefits...."



    We can all get carried away by wanting something so we mentally search around for extra "reasons" we ought to get it! Been there, done that.




    Sounds like me every time I talk myself into changing to a different set of clubs.
    Callaway Epic Flash SZ 9* HZRDUS Smoke Green "The Hulk" 60 6.5TX
    Callaway Epic Flash SZ 15* Evenflow Black 75 6.5
    Callaway X-Forged UT 21* w/Motore Speeder TS 8.8 X
    Callaway 2016 Apex Pro 4-PW KBS 130X
    Taylormade Spider X Navy/White 35"
    Callaway MD3 52, 56, 60
    All sitting comfortably in my Sun Mountain Sync Cart Bag
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    radiman wrote:



    Without knowing you or your family and friends, I'd give the generic advice that if you really want to join because of the golf in a 6-month golf climate then be careful not to try to convince yourself by thinking "But there's also the social benefits...."



    We can all get carried away by wanting something so we mentally search around for extra "reasons" we ought to get it! Been there, done that.




    Sounds like me every time I talk myself into changing to a different set of clubs.




    The classic one is, "And these are so sweet to hit I'll practice a lot more". That's kind of like promising to feed and walk that puppy you wanted when you were eight years old ;-)
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • zoned_post_meridiemzoned_post_meridiem Members Posts: 95 ✭✭✭
    edited Aug 28, 2018 #67

    radiman wrote:



    Without knowing you or your family and friends, I'd give the generic advice that if you really want to join because of the golf in a 6-month golf climate then be careful not to try to convince yourself by thinking "But there's also the social benefits...."



    We can all get carried away by wanting something so we mentally search around for extra "reasons" we ought to get it! Been there, done that.




    Sounds like me every time I talk myself into changing to a different set of clubs.




    The classic one is, "And these are so sweet to hit I'll practice a lot more". That's kind of like promising to feed and walk that puppy you wanted when you were eight years old ;-)




    Or, as half of this thread is doing right now, you start mentally committing yourself to a CC membership just so you can decide not to join and use the money you "saved" on a new set of clubs.
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭


    radiman wrote:



    Without knowing you or your family and friends, I'd give the generic advice that if you really want to join because of the golf in a 6-month golf climate then be careful not to try to convince yourself by thinking "But there's also the social benefits...."



    We can all get carried away by wanting something so we mentally search around for extra "reasons" we ought to get it! Been there, done that.




    Sounds like me every time I talk myself into changing to a different set of clubs.




    The classic one is, "And these are so sweet to hit I'll practice a lot more". That's kind of like promising to feed and walk that puppy you wanted when you were eight years old ;-)




    Or, as half of this thread is doing right now, you start mentally committing yourself to a CC membership just so you can decide not to join and use the money "saved" on a new set of clubs.




    Your time here has not been wasted, young Grasshopper. The student has now become the master.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,839 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Aug 28, 2018 #69



    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />
    Post edited by Unknown User on
    • Titleist TS2 9.5, PX HZRDUS Red 65 "6.0"
    • Titleist 917D2 15*, Diamana Blueboard 83 x5ct "S"
    • Titleist 716T-MB 17* 2 iron, Steelfiber i95cw "S"
    • Titleist 716CB 3i-PW, Steelfiber i95cw "S"
    • SM6 F-52*, Steelfiber i110cw "S"
    • SM6 M-58*, DG-S200
    • SC California Monterey
    • ProV1





  • FairwindsgolferFairwindsgolfer Members Posts: 625 ✭✭✭✭✭




    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle".

    Bridgestone J33 combo 5-pw
    Ping G400 LST driver
    Callaway Rogue 4 wood
    Nike CPR 2 hybrid
    Cobra Baffler 3 hybrid
    Callaway MD4 50, 54, 60 wedges
    Putter- I hate them all

  • thejuicethejuice AtlantaMembers Posts: 2,082 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited Sep 3, 2018 #71
    OP, I don’t think it’s worth it unless you get reciprocation at other courses. You’re going to get bored with the same course and a monthly bill. Plus it’s not like you have year-round golf, so you’ll pay that much for four to five months of golf? Save your money and move to the South!!!
    TaylorMade M3 w/HZRDUS Yellow stiff
    TaylorMade M4 Tour 3 wood w/HZRDUS Red stiff
    TaylorMade M3 2 hybrid (set to 19*) w/HZRDUS Black stiff
    Srixon U65 4i Miyazaki Stiff
    Srixon 765 5-PW Modus 120 Stiff
    Cleveland RTX 3.0 50*, 54*, and 58* KBS 61
    TaylorMade Spider Black

    Gameball: Vice Pro Plus, Srixon Q Star Tour
  • ddettsddetts Roy McAvoy Sioux Falls, SDClubWRX Posts: 1,713 ClubWRX
    thejuice wrote:


    OP, I don’t think it’s worth it unless you get reciprocation at other courses. You’re going to get bored with the same course and a monthly bill. Plus it’s not like you have year-round golf, so you’ll pay that much for four to five months of golf? Save your money and move to the South!!!




    ^^^ This right here!



    I'd have to be in a financially good enough spot that it wouldn't bother me to spend another $1000 a season to golf a few other places for variety.

    > See my current WITB
    Callaway Rogue Sub Zero 9°, Project X Even Flow Blue 6.5 65 gram
    TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15°, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
    TaylorMade P790 UDI 17°, Project X HZRDUS85 6.0
    Mizuno MP-18 MMC 3 Fli-Hi | 4-PW, Project X LZ 6.5
    Mizuno T7 52-09 | 58-12
    TaylorMade TP Mullen

    Twitter-icon.png lDLcKyO.png?1
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,737 ✭✭✭✭✭✭





    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle".






    Even members already in at the club, current on dues all payments, may be asked to leave. It is more legend now, but the owners of the island used to blackball members with a black sweater if they had worn out their welcome. It was a nice sweater too, black handmade cashmere but it was like the blackspot to pirates death amongst the club.
  • radimanradiman Members Posts: 4,724 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    thejuice wrote:


    OP, I don’t think it’s worth it unless you get reciprocation at other courses. You’re going to get bored with the same course and a monthly bill. Plus it’s not like you have year-round golf, so you’ll pay that much for four to five months of golf? Save your money and move to the South!!!




    I don't know if I could convince my wife to move that far away from her Mother! I've been trying though. I keep telling her that Texas would be a great state to live in.
    Callaway Epic Flash SZ 9* HZRDUS Smoke Green "The Hulk" 60 6.5TX
    Callaway Epic Flash SZ 15* Evenflow Black 75 6.5
    Callaway X-Forged UT 21* w/Motore Speeder TS 8.8 X
    Callaway 2016 Apex Pro 4-PW KBS 130X
    Taylormade Spider X Navy/White 35"
    Callaway MD3 52, 56, 60
    All sitting comfortably in my Sun Mountain Sync Cart Bag
  • zoned_post_meridiemzoned_post_meridiem Members Posts: 95 ✭✭✭
    This thread has me looking ever-so-slightly more seriously at country clubs, even though the economics (given our cheap and relatively good public courses) just don't make sense around here. **** it.



    If they had anything decent/golf-related programmed for the winter months, I'd be seriously tempted to make the leap. OP, keep us (especially us locals) updated.
  • az2auaz2au Members Posts: 1,895 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Honestly, I'd probably play less than 5 rounds/year locally if I didn't belong to a club. Another wrx'er and I who belong to the same club played a round at a casual pace today in 3:03 (I was walking, he was in a cart). There's a 0.0% chance I would have played if I were facing a 4.5+ hour round at a public course in a cart. Two reasons. I can no longer tolerate golf in a cart unless I'm on some sort of vacation/drinking thing. As Brad Klein said the other day on a podcast, "Playing golf in a cart is like watching other people have [email protected]" That's just not interesting to me. The other is that from the time I left him till the time I got back was right around 5 total hours because we sat around and chatted for a few minutes due to something my wife had going on. I could have legitimately been back in 4:15 without hurrying and I live 20 minutes from the club I played at today. 4:00 golf is almost as bad as riding in a cart. I'll never figure it out for the life of me as we couldn't have played more casually than we did and still finished in just over 3:00 (if we hurried 2:30 was quite possible but, why hurry?). 4:00 is glacier/sloth like. 4:30 is like someone is trying to drain the life out of me. Playing the best possible golf course, in the best possible conditions at a reasonable pace is worth paying far more to me.
  • jboogie146jboogie146 Members Posts: 35 ✭✭
    edited Sep 4, 2018 #77
    I just joined a private course in my area, Northwest Indiana. I'm sure the amenities are similiar to most other private courses out there, Pool, nice driving range, putting green and chipping area. A very nice newer updated club house, which is really nice. And obviously the golf course, which is also very nice. The membership is where they don't take tee times, you just show up and play.



    I'm just curious what others are paying for your memberships in your area? This year, being a new member, I paid $2,500. Which includes the rest of this year and all of next year. This includes (for my whole family) golf, pool, range but the cart is extra if your not a walker. I also don't have to pay F&B dues until April, which is $125 a month. If I pay upfront then I will have a balance of $1,125 to use through out the year. I can spend $0 for 2 months and then $375 the next and its all the same.



    After next year, it increases to $3,000 a year and F&B stays the same, $125 a month, or pay upfront and its the same as above ($1500 a year). So $4,500 total.



    So what is everyone else paying for their memberships?
  • me05501me05501 Members Posts: 412 ✭✭





    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle".




    Can I answer that from my perspective even if I wasn't the poster you asked?



    There are definitely people who make their country club the center of their social life not only for rounds of golf but dinner on the weekends, pool time with the family, participating in all the special events, and all that. That member's social lifestyle depends heavily on the club and its membership. I'm not sure what proportion of members fit into this category, but the members who do use the club this way tend to call the shots over time. They end up on the board of directors, they become captains for the money games, and their opinions are considered as management decisions are made. It could be argued that they spend the most money and time at the club, so perhaps they should have more input on how it's run.



    I see this as separate from "private club golf." There are members who join a club primarily for access to a better course that is well-maintained and less crowded than public courses. Maybe they want a great practice area, or a ready stable of other players who know and enjoy the course and might give them a game on the spur of the moment.



    No matter which type of member you might be, there are certain expectations of club member behavior. Members are expected to obey and protect the club rules, treat other members with respect, defer to the club pro's authority over the course, accommodate the club's junior members, etc. There are times when a club member will have to sacrifice his own immediate best interests in favor of the club's overall interests.



    I've been a club member, but I'm mostly a public golfer at this point. I meet and play with plenty of people who aren't "cut out for" private club golf or the social lifestyle that might go along with it. They enjoy playing the game, but maybe they care nothing about the rules of golf or simple golf decorum. Maybe they ignore the course rules as soon as they're out of site of the clubhouse. Maybe they disrespect the group ahead of or behind their group. Maybe they're indiscreet when they pee on a tree within site of someone's home. They're not into being chided or corrected for this kind of stuff. And honestly, they can be a lot of fun to play with, as long as you're not too stuffy to have a good time. Still, they'd never fit in at a country club.



    There are all kinds of people. That's what makes the world fun.
  • The PearlThe Pearl Members Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I am lucky in that my muni options are plentiful. A nice rotation of 6 courses, all in decent shape and very rarely do I experience a round over 4 hours. There is a very nice private CC very close to my house. Very little play and the place is immaculate, but the course layout is not any better than two of the muni's which are very nice. The big draw back is that they are equity memberships, so once you are in you are captive. I have know 4 members over the years and they all wanted out after a couple of years. So I think there is a culture issue.
  • thejuicethejuice AtlantaMembers Posts: 2,082 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    radiman wrote:

    thejuice wrote:


    OP, I don’t think it’s worth it unless you get reciprocation at other courses. You’re going to get bored with the same course and a monthly bill. Plus it’s not like you have year-round golf, so you’ll pay that much for four to five months of golf? Save your money and move to the South!!!




    I don't know if I could convince my wife to move that far away from her Mother! I've been trying though. I keep telling her that Texas would be a great state to live in.




    I hope she comes to her senses soon!!!! OR you move to Texas and build a really nice mother-in-law suite for dear old mom!!!!
    TaylorMade M3 w/HZRDUS Yellow stiff
    TaylorMade M4 Tour 3 wood w/HZRDUS Red stiff
    TaylorMade M3 2 hybrid (set to 19*) w/HZRDUS Black stiff
    Srixon U65 4i Miyazaki Stiff
    Srixon 765 5-PW Modus 120 Stiff
    Cleveland RTX 3.0 50*, 54*, and 58* KBS 61
    TaylorMade Spider Black

    Gameball: Vice Pro Plus, Srixon Q Star Tour
  • MignuzMignuz Members Posts: 118 ✭✭✭
    In Italy we kind don't have these kind of problems.

    All our courses are private and, to play golf, you have to be a member of the Italian Federation (€ 100/year) to play and you have to be member of a Golf Club.

    But, in exchange, we could find different kind of courses of different prices.

    Ah, to "solve" the problem of the obligation to be member of the italian federation and of a GC, there is the possibility to join an online GC, with an expence of 150 €/ year more or less and pay green fees (quite expansive anyway) when you play.

    Anyway, let's say that being member of a GC similar to your muni course costs around 7/800 € a year, but being member of a GOOD golf course costs 2/3.000 € a year.

    Of course, depends on the location, some GC are very exclusive and request an entrance fee plus the year membership, but you can find great courses at a reasonable price.

    This is my GC: 27 holes, pool, gym, tennis and futsal courts, sauna etc: http://www.asologolf.it/

    Membership costs 2.500 € a year.



    I wish that even here it would be possible to have muni courses and just play when and where you want, without being member of a GC, even if I would be a member of a GC anyway.
  • Lagavulin62Lagavulin62 Members Posts: 2,318 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    me05501 wrote:


    The grass is always greener (pun intended). For every guy standing outside a great private club looking in, there's another guy inside who is dreading his next monthly bill.








    Exactly how I would put it. Well said.



    OP, not sure what your choices are but maybe try and play different courses more often. Also if you are bored hitting driver wedge, well dont hit driver wedge. Tiger is cool with it.



    Bottom line, your satisfaction with golf has nothing to do with joining an expensive club with pristine conditions. Oh and that BMW won’t increase your lifelong love of driving.
  • FairwindsgolferFairwindsgolfer Members Posts: 625 ✭✭✭✭✭
    me05501 wrote:






    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle".




    Can I answer that from my perspective even if I wasn't the poster you asked?



    There are definitely people who make their country club the center of their social life not only for rounds of golf but dinner on the weekends, pool time with the family, participating in all the special events, and all that. That member's social lifestyle depends heavily on the club and its membership. I'm not sure what proportion of members fit into this category, but the members who do use the club this way tend to call the shots over time. They end up on the board of directors, they become captains for the money games, and their opinions are considered as management decisions are made. It could be argued that they spend the most money and time at the club, so perhaps they should have more input on how it's run.



    I see this as separate from "private club golf." There are members who join a club primarily for access to a better course that is well-maintained and less crowded than public courses. Maybe they want a great practice area, or a ready stable of other players who know and enjoy the course and might give them a game on the spur of the moment.



    No matter which type of member you might be, there are certain expectations of club member behavior. Members are expected to obey and protect the club rules, treat other members with respect, defer to the club pro's authority over the course, accommodate the club's junior members, etc. There are times when a club member will have to sacrifice his own immediate best interests in favor of the club's overall interests.



    I've been a club member, but I'm mostly a public golfer at this point. I meet and play with plenty of people who aren't "cut out for" private club golf or the social lifestyle that might go along with it. They enjoy playing the game, but maybe they care nothing about the rules of golf or simple golf decorum. Maybe they ignore the course rules as soon as they're out of site of the clubhouse. Maybe they disrespect the group ahead of or behind their group. Maybe they're indiscreet when they pee on a tree within site of someone's home. They're not into being chided or corrected for this kind of stuff. And honestly, they can be a lot of fun to play with, as long as you're not too stuffy to have a good time. Still, they'd never fit in at a country club.



    There are all kinds of people. That's what makes the world fun.


    I appreciate your explanation and I now see what was meant by that.

    My initial concern was the duplicate mentioning of living in a gated community and then ending his post by saying some people are not cut out for private golf.

    Initially, it wreaked of elitism which I don't do very well with but now I understand it probably wasn't the author's intention to come across like that

    Bridgestone J33 combo 5-pw
    Ping G400 LST driver
    Callaway Rogue 4 wood
    Nike CPR 2 hybrid
    Cobra Baffler 3 hybrid
    Callaway MD4 50, 54, 60 wedges
    Putter- I hate them all

  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    me05501 wrote:





    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.


    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle".




    Can I answer that from my perspective even if I wasn't the poster you asked?



    There are definitely people who make their country club the center of their social life not only for rounds of golf but dinner on the weekends, pool time with the family, participating in all the special events, and all that. That member's social lifestyle depends heavily on the club and its membership. I'm not sure what proportion of members fit into this category, but the members who do use the club this way tend to call the shots over time. They end up on the board of directors, they become captains for the money games, and their opinions are considered as management decisions are made. It could be argued that they spend the most money and time at the club, so perhaps they should have more input on how it's run.



    I see this as separate from "private club golf." There are members who join a club primarily for access to a better course that is well-maintained and less crowded than public courses. Maybe they want a great practice area, or a ready stable of other players who know and enjoy the course and might give them a game on the spur of the moment.



    No matter which type of member you might be, there are certain expectations of club member behavior. Members are expected to obey and protect the club rules, treat other members with respect, defer to the club pro's authority over the course, accommodate the club's junior members, etc. There are times when a club member will have to sacrifice his own immediate best interests in favor of the club's overall interests.



    I've been a club member, but I'm mostly a public golfer at this point. I meet and play with plenty of people who aren't "cut out for" private club golf or the social lifestyle that might go along with it. They enjoy playing the game, but maybe they care nothing about the rules of golf or simple golf decorum. Maybe they ignore the course rules as soon as they're out of site of the clubhouse. Maybe they disrespect the group ahead of or behind their group. Maybe they're indiscreet when they pee on a tree within site of someone's home. They're not into being chided or corrected for this kind of stuff. And honestly, they can be a lot of fun to play with, as long as you're not too stuffy to have a good time. Still, they'd never fit in at a country club.



    There are all kinds of people. That's what makes the world fun.


    I appreciate your explanation and I now see what was meant by that.

    My initial concern was the duplicate mentioning of living in a gated community and then ending his post by saying some people are not cut out for private golf.

    Initially, it wreaked of elitism which I don't do very well with but now I understand it probably wasn't the author's intention to come across like that




    If our Pepper said it, then you can be certain it WAS intended to be elitist, dismissive and condescending. That's his thing.
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • 2bGood2bGood Members Posts: 5,224 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I been playing private golf for 15 years now. I am actually shocked what goes on at (some) public courses when I do play them. Players don't rake traps, fix ball marks, fill divots, over 4 hour rounds, they hit into you, pick up your ball etc etc.





    If you join the right private club you do really get spoiled.





    For me joining a private club was nothing short of life changing. Made GREAT friends ad my social life revolves around the club.
  • radimanradiman Members Posts: 4,724 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    2bGood wrote:


    I been playing private golf for 15 years now. I am actually shocked what goes on at (some) public courses when I do play them. Players don't rake traps, fix ball marks, fill divots, over 4 hour rounds, they hit into you, pick up your ball etc etc.





    If you join the right private club you do really get spoiled.





    For me joining a private club was nothing short of life changing. Made GREAT friends ad my social life revolves around the club.




    The one club I could possibly afford doesn't seem to have much of a social scene. There is golf, a pool, and a bar. I think it is a golf first club. So, I don't see my social life (or lack there of) changing much. If I do join, I may wait until the end of next year. They always do an August deal. Pay $500 to play the rest of the season and that goes towards your membership the next year. Maximize my investment you could say.
    Callaway Epic Flash SZ 9* HZRDUS Smoke Green "The Hulk" 60 6.5TX
    Callaway Epic Flash SZ 15* Evenflow Black 75 6.5
    Callaway X-Forged UT 21* w/Motore Speeder TS 8.8 X
    Callaway 2016 Apex Pro 4-PW KBS 130X
    Taylormade Spider X Navy/White 35"
    Callaway MD3 52, 56, 60
    All sitting comfortably in my Sun Mountain Sync Cart Bag
  • Lagavulin62Lagavulin62 Members Posts: 2,318 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    2bGood wrote:


    I been playing private golf for 15 years now. I am actually shocked what goes on at (some) public courses when I do play them. Players don't rake traps, fix ball marks, fill divots, over 4 hour rounds, they hit into you, pick up your ball etc etc.





    If you join the right private club you do really get spoiled.





    For me joining a private club was nothing short of life changing. Made GREAT friends ad my social life revolves around the club.








    I guess it really has been a long time since I played a fully muni/public course. Golf etiquette should not be exclusive to private clubs.



    I get where club life is not fir everyone. It’s sure not for me. But that has nothing to do with golf.
  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers Posts: 15,839 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭





    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle."




    I have encountered many people that for different reasons don't fit into private clubs. The biggest reason, however, is they are not joiners and maybe shy, socially. I won't go into the second reason.

    After many years chairing membership committees and on the BOD and visiting other private clubs to see how they lead & manage, there's a core reason many new members leave within a year. Most clubs don't have programs that help new members assimilate.



    Also, private clubs have a rule limitation that new members are seldom told exists. A limited number of times members can bring friends to play each month. That number depends on the clubs charter.

    Accordingly, shy new members are left to make friends on their own. After an extended period in a private club, to some people, it can appear difficult to get into inner-circles to make new friends. A husband or wife might be a joiner, but the SO may not be, which can be challenging at home. Though private club golf is in many ways superior to public golf, even golf clubs without country club facilities have social structures. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />
    • Titleist TS2 9.5, PX HZRDUS Red 65 "6.0"
    • Titleist 917D2 15*, Diamana Blueboard 83 x5ct "S"
    • Titleist 716T-MB 17* 2 iron, Steelfiber i95cw "S"
    • Titleist 716CB 3i-PW, Steelfiber i95cw "S"
    • SM6 F-52*, Steelfiber i110cw "S"
    • SM6 M-58*, DG-S200
    • SC California Monterey
    • ProV1





  • Schley Schley Love ya don't tell ya enough! Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaMembers Posts: 1,219 ✭✭✭✭✭✭






    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle."




    I have encountered many people that for different reasons don't fit into private clubs. The biggest reason, however, is they are not joiners and maybe shy, socially. I won't go into the second reason.

    After many years chairing membership committees and on the BOD and visiting other private clubs to see how they lead & manage, there's a core reason many new members leave within a year. Most clubs don't have programs that help new members assimilate.



    Also, private clubs have a rule limitation that new members are seldom told exists. A limited number of times members can bring friends to play each month. That number depends on the clubs charter.

    Accordingly, shy new members are left to make friends on their own. After an extended period in a private club, to some people, it can appear difficult to get into inner-circles to make new friends. A husband or wife might be a joiner, but the SO may not be, which can be challenging at home. Though private club golf is in many ways superior to public golf, even golf clubs without country club facilities have social structures. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />




    What do you mean by this? The limit on any 1 guest who can play in a calendar year or????
  • North ButteNorth Butte Members Posts: 10,965 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Schley wrote:



    Also, private clubs have a rule limitation that new members are seldom told exists. A limited number of times members can bring friends to play each month. That number depends on the clubs charter.

    Accordingly, shy new members are left to make friends on their own. After an extended period in a private club, to some people, it can appear difficult to get into inner-circles to make new friends. A husband or wife might be a joiner, but the SO may not be, which can be challenging at home. Though private club golf is in many ways superior to public golf, even golf clubs without country club facilities have social structures. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />




    What do you mean by this? The limit on any 1 guest who can play in a calendar year or????




    I find it hard to believe someone would pony up an initial buy-in of tens of thousands of dollars (for a Pepper-level club) and not bother to read up on the rules concerning when and with whom they can play how often. But maybe there are lots of complete idiots out there with money to burn...
    “1lb beefstak, with
    1pt bitter beer
    every 6 hours.
    1 ten-mile walk every morning.
    1 bed at 11 sharp every night.
    And don't stuff your head with things you don't understand.” 
  • Lagavulin62Lagavulin62 Members Posts: 2,318 ✭✭✭✭✭✭






    My only advice if you're considering joining a private club is don't drag a friend along. Private clubs are not only about the quality of golf but meeting other members and developing new friendships.




    THIS.



    My wife just started playing last year, and really enjoys it, so we decided to take the plunge and get a membership somewhere. We looked at a few privates and a few publics in the area. When we visited the course we eventually joined, all the members were very friendly and outgoing, and the place just felt right. We've been members for just over a year now, and have developed a lot of close friendships. I've got a group of about 8 guys that I'll play regularly with, and about another dozen that I'll play random occasional rounds with. I've played more golf in the last year than I did in the previous 15 years combined (I picked up the clubs again about 3 years ago after a long hiatus where I only played drunken charity scrambles). The club has really become the focal point of our social lives, and it's been fantastic.




    Glad for you and the wife. When we first joined a private club, we did it for golf. But I am a joiner, and so is my wife. I signed up for a few committees, and my wife did the same in the women's club. Before I knew it, I was chairing committees and found myself meeting darn near all the members. Like you, the Country Club became the focal point in our social lives. I joined inter-club team play a year later, and so did my wife. We had so much fun when we got home from work we seldom left our gated community. Our non-club long-time friends loved visiting us for days and golfing. We took the street-legal golf cart everywhere.



    I can't say enough good things about private club membership and living in a gated community. The club room bartender even kept my brand of single malt for me behind the bar. Except it must be said, not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle. For the time being, we're club-less but looking forward to finding another club in the not too distant future when we're both retired and find our final gated golf course community home. Anyway, good luck and great golf. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />


    Can you please elaborate what you mean by the following statement:

    "not everyone is cut out for private club golf and social lifestyle."




    I have encountered many people that for different reasons don't fit into private clubs. The biggest reason, however, is they are not joiners and maybe shy, socially. I won't go into the second reason.

    After many years chairing membership committees and on the BOD and visiting other private clubs to see how they lead & manage, there's a core reason many new members leave within a year. Most clubs don't have programs that help new members assimilate.



    Also, private clubs have a rule limitation that new members are seldom told exists. A limited number of times members can bring friends to play each month. That number depends on the clubs charter.

    Accordingly, shy new members are left to make friends on their own. After an extended period in a private club, to some people, it can appear difficult to get into inner-circles to make new friends. A husband or wife might be a joiner, but the SO may not be, which can be challenging at home. Though private club golf is in many ways superior to public golf, even golf clubs without country club facilities have social structures. image/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />




    “SO” ?

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file