Why don't people take lessons ?

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  • BB28403BB28403 Members Posts: 3,645 ✭✭
    Because guys have their swing ingrained and even if an instructor makes some changes , they will probably eventually revert to their established original swing.




    That’s why you take detailed notes of each lesson. So later on you can see the progression from your old swing to the new swing and you hopefully can follow the breadcrumbs to get it back if you lose it.
  • OldFrog75OldFrog75 Fort Worth, TexasMembers Posts: 67 ✭✭
    edited Feb 10, 2019 9:51am #33
    Three things come to mind:



    1) The cost - $100/hour minimum and 1 lesson would never be enough

    2) Lack of trust finding the "right" coach - I'm older with some physical issues that affect my swing. Most of the instructors I see out on the range are half my age and so I question how much empathy and experience they can have working with someone like me.

    3) Finding a coach whose SOP (or MO) is to tweak a few things rather than attempt to completely rebuild my swing based upon their perception of perfection.



    But for $20/hour I would forget about points 2 and 3 and try some lessons.
    Post edited by Unknown User on
  • MelloYelloMelloYello Upstate, SCMembers Posts: 3,269 ✭✭
    edited Feb 10, 2019 9:25am #34
    Good Lord, guys...be honest, it's cost!





    I used to teach guitar when I was a student. I taught at a local mom & pop shop that sold guitars and other music-related stuff. Our rates were $60/mo which meant that parents could easily budget for their kids to come in once a week and receive 30-minute lessons.



    The full-time teachers worked a 40-hour week so they could theoretically accommodate 80 half-hour lessons or 80 students. The agreement was that teachers kept $45 out of the $60 and that $15 went to the store. This system meant that a full-time teacher would max out at $45 x 80 x 12 = $43k / yr. While that's not awesome by a lot of standards, it allowed full-time instructors to stay mostly booked up, which they liked.



    For any musician in the early 2000s, a stable salary north of $40k was attractive. That was 15 years ago, too. Now I see similar programs charging $75-$100 per month. I bet that extra money only goes to the stores though. Our particular store owner was an ex-teacher so he was good about letting the money go straight to the instructors.



    Anyway, the students in that scenario were essentially being charged $30 per hour. If we do that same math with someone who's charging $60, $80 or $100 per hour the "theoretical salary" gets ridiculous. In my experience, golf pros aren't making that kind of money because unlike the guitar instructor with their reasonable rates, the golf pros are starving for students.



    If I could sign up for golf lessons that were reasonable in price, I'd do it in a heartbeat as a matter of course. Just having a good player's eyes on my swing would likely be worth that. But usually rates are $50 - $75 per lesson! That adds up fast. And I don't know what I'm paying for. Am I paying for the time it takes to walk from the clubhouse to the range? Am I paying for chit-chat? Is this guy going to stop dead at 30-minutes and go back to work behind the counter? It's not like your doctors are ever dying to spend extra time with you when you're there! I know that for me, I usually seem to end up spending about 30% of my time waiting, 20% talking to the scheduler, 30% in the room with the nurse/assistant and maybe 20% with the actual doctor.



    So there's a worry about costs and benefits. That's all I'm saying.



    I'll be working with an instructor this year but that's largely because financially, I'm doing okay right now. I can splurge. But if an instructor really wants to fill up his schedule, he's got to price himself so that it's not just a luxury for the more wealthy people who may come and go at his course.



    The simple fact is that the common lesson packages you see priced at $300+ cannot be sustained by someone like myself. I'd like to do a weekly or bi-weekly lesson throughout the season and if they were $60-$75 per month I would, but ****, with the actual rates people are charging I'd end up spending thousands of dollars by the end of the year. F that.
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  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,720 ✭✭
    MelloYello wrote:


    Good Lord, guys...be honest, it's cost!





    I used to teach guitar when I was a student. I taught at a local mom & pop shop that sold guitars and other music-related stuff. Our rates were $60/mo which meant that parents could easily budget for their kids to come in once a week and receive 30-minute lessons.



    The full-time teachers worked a 40-hour week so they could theoretically accommodate 80 half-hour lessons or 80 students. The agreement was that teachers kept $45 out of the $60 and that $15 went to the store. This system meant that a full-time teacher would max out at $45 x 80 x 12 = $43k / yr. While that's not awesome by a lot of standards, it allowed full-time instructors to stay mostly booked up, which they liked.



    For any musician in the early 2000s, a stable salary north of $40k was attractive. That was 15 years ago, too. Now I see similar programs charging $75-$100 per month. I bet that extra money only goes to the stores though. Our particular store owner was an ex-teacher so he was good about letting the money go straight to the instructors.



    Anyway, the students in that scenario were essentially being charged $30 per hour. If we do that same math with someone who's charging $60, $80 or $100 per hour the "theoretical salary" gets ridiculous. In my experience, golf pros aren't making that kind of money because unlike the guitar instructor with their reasonable rates, the golf pros are starving for students.



    If I could sign up for golf lessons that were reasonable in price, I'd do it in a heartbeat as a matter of course. Just having a good player's eyes on my swing would likely be worth that. But usually rates are $50 - $75 per lesson! That adds up fast. And I don't know what I'm paying for. Am I paying for the time it takes to walk from the clubhouse to the range? Am I paying for chit-chat? Is this guy going to stop dead at 30-minutes and go back to work behind the counter? It's not like your doctors are ever dying to spend extra time with you when you're there! I know that for me, I usually seem to end up spending about 30% of my time waiting, 20% talking to the scheduler, 30% in the room with the nurse/assistant and maybe 20% with the actual doctor.



    So there's a worry about costs and benefits. That's all I'm saying.



    I'll be working with an instructor this year but that's largely because financially, I'm doing okay right now. I can splurge. But if an instructor really wants to fill up his schedule, he's got to price himself so that it's not just a luxury for the more wealthy people who may come and go at his course.



    The simple fact is that the common lesson packages you see priced at $300+ cannot be sustained by someone like myself. I'd like to do a weekly or bi-weekly lesson throughout the season and if they were $60-$75 per month I would, but ****, with the actual rates people are charging I'd end up spending thousands of dollars by the end of the year. F that.




    You don’t need weekly or biweekly lessons. One a month is sufficient. It takes time to change motor patterns. And plenty of teachers charging $150+ an hour teach more than 40 hours a week. The good ones aren’t starving for students. They have to turn them away at times
  • RichieHuntRichieHunt Members Posts: 3,646 ✭✭
    Perceived payoffs versus perceived investment.



    The golfers see them having to put in too much money and too much of their time and effort and not seeing enough of a return (improved golf).



    Most golfers that are 10+ handicaps are pretty satisfied if they can consistently get the ball airborne. But, getting the ball airborne consistently is not something they deem as enough of a benefit that they would pay extra money and put all of this extra time into trying to achieve.



    To compound the problem, they think that getting the ball airborne consistently is just a case of 'keeping your head down.' It's not, but the perception is different and in the business world...perception becomes reality. And their thinking is 'I don't need an instructor to teach me to keep my head down.'



    Thus, they'll never get lessons unless they cannot consistently get the ball airborne (or if they are hitting shanks). If they go to a teacher to start getting the ball consistently airborne...once that is accomplished they stop getting lessons because they don't think the rewards of getting beyond consistent airborne shots are great enough or they think they would have to invest and unreasonable amount of money and time to do so.



    I don't believe these things are true, but again...perception becomes reality in the world of consumerism.

















    RH
  • chris975dchris975d GeorgiaClubWRX Posts: 1,912 ClubWRX
    BrianMcG wrote:
    Because a lesson may cost $50, whereas that new driver that promises lower scores costs $500. Wait, never mind.



    Really, I think some people have a very fragile ego, and don't want to be told they are wrong, or are really self conscious about their game.



    I've heard lots of new golfers say they want to get better first before taking a lesson, because they don't want to embarrass themselves in front of the Pro.




    From being in the business over 20 years, this is a lot of it. The average golfer feels a lot of embarrassment and anxiety hitting in front of "experts". It's also the reason the majority of new clubs are sold off the rack. I hear it almost every day as to why golfers won't go through a proper fitting...they are too self conscious about their game/swing to do it.
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  • Hateto3PuttHateto3Putt Smoking Makes You Look Cool! Members Posts: 6,277 ✭✭
    My buddy took a few lessons, then quit. I asked him why he quit and he replied....



    "The guy kept trying to tell me what to do!"



    Golf_lessonstudentdriver_767.jpg
  • BKN1964BKN1964 Members Posts: 968 ✭✭
    I fit your stated criteria of a high index (20) golfer who is dedicated to improving. I'm either at the range or the course at least 5 times per week, working hard to improve and making no progress.



    My experience, having seen at least 6 instructors over the past 5 years: Each time I try a new instructor, I ask them specifically to show me how to swing the club through the ball, as I truly feel I don't understand the basics of swinging from the top of the backswing through the ball. To a person, the response has always been "show me a few swings and we'll go from there". I suppose it's my fault for not being more emphatic and insisting. They then end up working on something like keeping my left arm straight, or getting my hands higher, etc. These may all be valid faults on my end, but they mean nothing to me if I feel like they're not addressing my core question, which is how to swing through the ball.



    Try finding any published media (video, books, etc.), that make it very clear how to swing the club. I haven't been able to. At least not something I can make any sense of. Mike Malaska comes closest in his videos, although his method seems to get me very steep and lacking power.



    So for me, it's become a matter of feeling like I'm wasting money. I'll likely keep trying different instructors, hoping I'll find one that can give me a swing feel that makes sense, but I'm becoming less confident that will happen.
  • J2puttsJ2putts Members Posts: 611 ✭✭
    I am fortunate that I found a great instructor right off the bat. I see him once a week from early December to beginning of March . I pay $50 an hour , and it's on trackman , in a heated bay , hitting out to range . So for me i find that very affordable and it keeps me swinging through new England winters. Even more valuable is that I shoot video back and forth to him, and there's a constant line communication. He has become so busy , that his rates went up, but pre-existing students rate stay the same. So perhaps my situation is pretty ideal in regards to others.
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  • robert lindrobert lind Members Posts: 17 ✭✭
    BKN1964 wrote:


    My experience, having seen at least 6 instructors over the past 5 years: Each time I try a new instructor, I ask them specifically to show me how to swing the club through the ball, as I truly feel I don't understand the basics of swinging from the top of the backswing through the ball. To a person, the response has always been "show me a few swings and we'll go from there". I suppose it's my fault for not being more emphatic and insisting. They then end up working on something like keeping my left arm straight, or getting my hands higher, etc. These may all be valid faults on my end, but they mean nothing to me if I feel like they're not addressing my core question, which is how to swing through the ball.



    Try finding any published media (video, books, etc.), that make it very clear how to swing the club. I haven't been able to. At least not something I can make any sense of. Mike Malaska comes closest in his videos, although his method seems to get me very steep and lacking power.



    So for me, it's become a matter of feeling like I'm wasting money. I'll likely keep trying different instructors, hoping I'll find one that can give me a swing feel that makes sense, but I'm becoming less confident that will happen.




    BKN I totally agree.



    I have stopped taking lessons becouse I have never noticed any improvmen in my swing.

    After each lesson I have had the habit to write down what the Pro said and strangely all the Pros talked about different things, little things of no importance in my swing and no one mentioned anything about the really important stuff you must know for you to become a better golfer. Actually one Pro refused to answer my specific question that I had prepared about these more important parts of the swing.



    I strongly belive that the Pros of PGA don´t want to teach us "hackers" a decent golfswing. At all cost they avoid teaching parts of the swing that really would make a difference. On internet there are instructors with no connection to PGA and they seem to be more free to speak about the swing.



    Now, please investigate and do some thinking of your own.

    The single most important thing to learn in golf is the common normal swing. You use it all the time with the driver, to transport the ball to get it onto the green and so on.

    If you know how to execute this swing you will soon be a singleplayer. This swing is so important for every golfer that every golfmagasine should have at least one in deapth article about this swing every year. I mean they have 2-3 articles about putting, chipping or bunkershots every year so how come there is not one article abt the full swing. It´s really weard.

    Now just find me one in deapth article about the normal swing, you can look in all golfmagasines and you can go back as manny year you want. Sadly you will not find anything except stack and tilt. Remember who´s writing instruction articles, well off course it´s the pros. And…..

    The Pros don´t want to teach us hackers to be better golfers, they want to keep us ignorant at all cost.

    I have stopped taking lessons becouse I have never noticed any improvmen in my swing.

    After each lesson I have had the habit to write down what the Pro said and strangely all the Pros talked about different things, little things of no importance in my swing and no one mentioned anything about the really important stuff you must know for you to become a better golfer. Actually one Pro refused to answer my specific question that I had prepared about these more important parts of the swing.



    I strongly belive that the Pros of PGA don´t want to teach us "hackers" a decent golfswing. At all cost they avoid teaching parts of the swing that really would make a difference. On internet there are instructors with no connection to PGA and they seem to be more free to speak about the swing.



    Now, please investigate and do some thinking of your own.

    The single most important thing to learn in golf is the common normal swing. You use it all the time with the driver, to transport the ball to get it onto the green and so on.

    If you know how to execute this swing you will soon be a singleplayer. This swing is so important for every golfer that every golfmagasine should have at least one in deapth article about this swing every year. I mean they have 2-3 articles about putting, chipping or bunkershots every year so..........

    Now just find me one in deapth article about the normal swing, you can look in all golfmagasines and you can go back as manny year you want. Sadly you will not find anything except stack and tilt. Remember who´s writing instruction articles, well off course it´s the pros. And…..

    The Pros and PGA don´t want to teach us hackers to be better golfers, they want to keep us ignorant at all cost.



    Why? Ohh common, the hole golfindusties revenue is depending on this. The ignorant hacker buys a lot more than a scilled singlehandicapper.
  • jut111jut111 Members Posts: 1,625 ✭✭
    right because you haven’t had success it’s a conspiracy. Good lord.
  • sandtrapsandtrap Members Posts: 823 ✭✭
    I think most will put you into a cookie cutter "this is the way you need to do it" rather than work with what you have.

    And, Most of us won't go and hit enough balls to make the changes natural so it probably will never translate into a better game.
  • 596596 Lakeland, FLMembers Posts: 3,624 ✭✭
    I'm not afraid of lessons. I just don't want to have one, period. Ya, it might be nice. Do I really really need one? no. Could it improve my game? Maybe, maybe not. I started playing golf at age 54. I never took a lesson. I played golf, not swing. I watched the ball flight and adjusted from there til I got the ball to do and go where and how I wanted/needed. In 18 months I was a 2 handicap. I love playing the game of golf, not golf swing. I still score in the 70s, I can play under par for 9 holes. I'm currently 63 years old.



    Peoples priorities are different. They play the game for different reasons. I play the game for fun and to learn all by myself. It's what I enjoy. Yes, I'll watch a video or 2 every year, I'll browse the instruction forum for thoughts but thats about it. I don't use "drills" since I have no idea what the problem is for that drill or if it applies to me.



    So, no, I'm not afraid of lessons, I'd rather do it myself and I'm happy with my game and the way and why I play.
  • BKN1964BKN1964 Members Posts: 968 ✭✭
    Posts 41 and 42 above:



    I don't believe there's any conspiracy going on. That would be just about impossible to hide.



    I do think there's something else going on.



    Maybe something more like:

    - People who can hit a ball well don't truly comprehend the lack of understanding by someone who can't, and therefore don't truly understand what's being sought.

    - Describing the golf swing is incredibly difficult.

    - There are so many ways to swing a club that instructors range between teaching one method that may not work for you, to trying to work with the way the student is swinging the club to optimize the results, even though, like in my case, I'm changing that way constantly because none of the things I try seem to "work".
  • parformeparforme Members Posts: 107 ✭✭
    Most people don't take lessons because they don't get the results they hoped for. First, most amateurs have so many compensations in their swings, fixing just one or two of them often causes them to take two steps backwards. And once they start playing worse, they immediately revert back to their "old" swing that they knew they could live with. My PGA pro has often told me he would be more successful if I stopped playing rounds and spent all my time on the range after my lessons until whatever we were working on was fixed, to prevent me from doing just that.
  • Cpm881Cpm881 Rookie Members Posts: 170 ✭✭
    BKN1964 wrote:


    I fit your stated criteria of a high index (20) golfer who is dedicated to improving. I'm either at the range or the course at least 5 times per week, working hard to improve and making no progress.



    My experience, having seen at least 6 instructors over the past 5 years: Each time I try a new instructor, I ask them specifically to show me how to swing the club through the ball, as I truly feel I don't understand the basics of swinging from the top of the backswing through the ball. To a person, the response has always been "show me a few swings and we'll go from there". I suppose it's my fault for not being more emphatic and insisting. They then end up working on something like keeping my left arm straight, or getting my hands higher, etc. These may all be valid faults on my end, but they mean nothing to me if I feel like they're not addressing my core question, which is how to swing through the ball.



    Try finding any published media (video, books, etc.), that make it very clear how to swing the club. I haven't been able to. At least not something I can make any sense of. Mike Malaska comes closest in his videos, although his method seems to get me very steep and lacking power.



    So for me, it's become a matter of feeling like I'm wasting money. I'll likely keep trying different instructors, hoping I'll find one that can give me a swing feel that makes sense, but I'm becoming less confident that will happen.




    Google robo golf pro. It's a crazy looking machine that swings the golf club for you. Wish I could get on one these just to see what feels I could pick up.
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  • LambLamb LondonMembers Posts: 325 ✭✭
    Teaching is an art. I don't believe many instructors have mastered this art.
  • oikos1oikos1 Members Posts: 2,268 ✭✭
    BKN1964 wrote:


    I fit your stated criteria of a high index (20) golfer who is dedicated to improving. I'm either at the range or the course at least 5 times per week, working hard to improve and making no progress.



    My experience, having seen at least 6 instructors over the past 5 years: Each time I try a new instructor, I ask them specifically to show me how to swing the club through the ball, as I truly feel I don't understand the basics of swinging from the top of the backswing through the ball. To a person, the response has always been "show me a few swings and we'll go from there". I suppose it's my fault for not being more emphatic and insisting. They then end up working on something like keeping my left arm straight, or getting my hands higher, etc. These may all be valid faults on my end, but they mean nothing to me if I feel like they're not addressing my core question, which is how to swing through the ball.



    Try finding any published media (video, books, etc.), that make it very clear how to swing the club. I haven't been able to. At least not something I can make any sense of. Mike Malaska comes closest in his videos, although his method seems to get me very steep and lacking power.



    So for me, it's become a matter of feeling like I'm wasting money. I'll likely keep trying different instructors, hoping I'll find one that can give me a swing feel that makes sense, but I'm becoming less confident that will happen.


    They can't give you a swing feel. They can say "This is what it should feel like" and "This is how it feels to me" and "Here, try this", but your feel is yours and yours alone.
  • Santiago GolfSantiago Golf I Strive to make you Better Members Posts: 4,997 ✭✭
    Lamb wrote:


    Teaching is an art. I don't believe many instructors have mastered this art.




    I agree with this. The PGA sucks at training teachers



    Driver: Taylormade M2 '17 10.5*; Accura Tour Z Pink, 85 M5 (285, can get one or two to carry 300+ if needed)
    Fairway: Taylormade Aeroburner TP 15*; Diamana Blueboard 72x (255)

    LOOKING FOR A 7 Wood (probably gunna be 230-235 club)
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    S Wedge: Scratch 1018 DS 57*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35.5", 63.5* lie (85): I HARDLY USE IT IN THE BUNKER
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  • Santiago GolfSantiago Golf I Strive to make you Better Members Posts: 4,997 ✭✭
    Number 1 reason is ego. All golfers have them. Golfers i teach learn right away that if you wanna get better you have tl drop your ego
    Driver: Taylormade M2 '17 10.5*; Accura Tour Z Pink, 85 M5 (285, can get one or two to carry 300+ if needed)
    Fairway: Taylormade Aeroburner TP 15*; Diamana Blueboard 72x (255)

    LOOKING FOR A 7 Wood (probably gunna be 230-235 club)
    Irons: Nike Vapor Pro Combo 4-AW; Aldila VS Proto "By You" 100x
    4-5; 38", 61* lie, 5 iron weight (220, 210) 6-8; 37", 62* lie, 8 iron weight (195, 180, 165) 9-AW; 36", 63* lie (150, 130, 110)

    S Wedge: Scratch 1018 DS 57*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35.5", 63.5* lie (85): I HARDLY USE IT IN THE BUNKER
    L Wedge: Maltby Third Wedge (Custom Grind) 62*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35", 64* lie: THIS IS MY BUNKER CLUB, HARDLY USE FROM OUTSIDE 40 YARDS!!
    Putter: Scotty Cameron Studio Design #5 MB, YES! Tour Tracey (for practice only)

    Ball: Vice Pro
    Grip: Super Stroke S-Tech Cord (Woods +6 wraps, Irons and wedges +8 wraps)
  • sdandreasdandrea Steve Members Posts: 2,352 ✭✭
    I play golf 4 days per week, so no time or money for lessons.
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  • Santiago GolfSantiago Golf I Strive to make you Better Members Posts: 4,997 ✭✭
    sdandrea wrote:


    I play golf 4 days per week, so no time or money for lessons.




    Why couldnt you take one week off every other month, take a lesson, practice and get a little better?
    Driver: Taylormade M2 '17 10.5*; Accura Tour Z Pink, 85 M5 (285, can get one or two to carry 300+ if needed)
    Fairway: Taylormade Aeroburner TP 15*; Diamana Blueboard 72x (255)

    LOOKING FOR A 7 Wood (probably gunna be 230-235 club)
    Irons: Nike Vapor Pro Combo 4-AW; Aldila VS Proto "By You" 100x
    4-5; 38", 61* lie, 5 iron weight (220, 210) 6-8; 37", 62* lie, 8 iron weight (195, 180, 165) 9-AW; 36", 63* lie (150, 130, 110)

    S Wedge: Scratch 1018 DS 57*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35.5", 63.5* lie (85): I HARDLY USE IT IN THE BUNKER
    L Wedge: Maltby Third Wedge (Custom Grind) 62*; Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx; 35", 64* lie: THIS IS MY BUNKER CLUB, HARDLY USE FROM OUTSIDE 40 YARDS!!
    Putter: Scotty Cameron Studio Design #5 MB, YES! Tour Tracey (for practice only)

    Ball: Vice Pro
    Grip: Super Stroke S-Tech Cord (Woods +6 wraps, Irons and wedges +8 wraps)
  • Redjeep83Redjeep83 Members Posts: 5,133 ✭✭
    Cpm881 wrote:

    BKN1964 wrote:


    I fit your stated criteria of a high index (20) golfer who is dedicated to improving. I'm either at the range or the course at least 5 times per week, working hard to improve and making no progress.



    My experience, having seen at least 6 instructors over the past 5 years: Each time I try a new instructor, I ask them specifically to show me how to swing the club through the ball, as I truly feel I don't understand the basics of swinging from the top of the backswing through the ball. To a person, the response has always been "show me a few swings and we'll go from there". I suppose it's my fault for not being more emphatic and insisting. They then end up working on something like keeping my left arm straight, or getting my hands higher, etc. These may all be valid faults on my end, but they mean nothing to me if I feel like they're not addressing my core question, which is how to swing through the ball.



    Try finding any published media (video, books, etc.), that make it very clear how to swing the club. I haven't been able to. At least not something I can make any sense of. Mike Malaska comes closest in his videos, although his method seems to get me very steep and lacking power.



    So for me, it's become a matter of feeling like I'm wasting money. I'll likely keep trying different instructors, hoping I'll find one that can give me a swing feel that makes sense, but I'm becoming less confident that will happen.




    Google robo golf pro. It's a crazy looking machine that swings the golf club for you. Wish I could get on one these just to see what feels I could pick up.




    Robo golf pro seems awkward when people are on it. You aren’t hitting a ball either and it’s pretty slow. Plus, the pros swings they can configure it to look nothing like their swings. I’ve always been able to make a good swing in slow motion and no ball, don’t need a robot for that, maybe for an absolute beginner
  • oz dee ceeoz dee cee Members Posts: 474 ✭✭
    For me there are no notable good coaches around. I’m sure some of them may be okay, but they teach old school stuff with positions and feels. They don’t seem to now biomechanics or basic faults. So I never get to the cause so never improve.



    So I go online now which works but takes a little more work as you don’t have that watchful eye on you for 30-60 mins.
  • MtlJeffMtlJeff MontrealMembers Posts: 28,370 ✭✭
    Some people don't REALLY want to get better.

    Some people don't really want to get better, even if they say they do

    It's hard knowing how to find a good instructor if you aren't a member at a private club

    Time commitments of golf are already high, spending time with am instructor means even more time



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  • CaddiesFaultCaddiesFault Golf Professional Members Posts: 802 ✭✭
    edited Feb 10, 2019 5:18pm #57
    Seeing improvement from someone that you are working with is super satisfying. The requisite work it takes from the player to keep progressing still must happen though. Taking lessons from a pro will put you in a position to keep progressing. It keeps your practice sessions from spinning your wheels or going backwards, but Its still up to you to actually go forwards. There is no substitute for hard work, lessons will just get you there quicker so long as you put in said work.



    It reminds me of a saying my HS Chemistry teacher used to say: "practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect". Instructors verify that what you are practicing is perfect for you, its still up to you to perform it in order to get better.



    That being said, there are people who make it though the PGA process who have no business teaching the golf swing. Knowing your limitations is important for a golf pro. A previous GM of mine, who is now a PGA Class A GM at a prominent club(was head pro previously), used to be a banker before going the PGA route. It took him a bunch of tries to pass the PAT. Hes a great GM, but he knows that teaching the golf swing is not his forte. Thats part of what makes him great at his job; he knows what he does well, and hires others to cover the rest.



    Personally I always open up my lesson by asking what you want to get from the lesson today. You want to see how a club should move through the zone? sure, lets do it. You want to fix a slice? well you probably wont be hitting a high draw in an hour, but we can detail a plan of action on how to change the path of the club, and what it will take. Need to put a bandaid over something for a tournament this weekend? lets find a go-to shot or thought. The lesson is for you, I'm just here to impart wisdom in the best manner possible. Knowledge is power!
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  • MaineMarinerMaineMariner Members Posts: 330 ✭✭
    I spent $150 on a set of lessons with a guy that came recommended to me and feel like I've gotten more value from YouTube. There were a few changes he made that were pretty helpful, but he spent so much time spouting platitudes and anecdotes that it drove me nuts. He must have spent half the time I had on the mental side of things, which is nice and all, but I can read books on that. And have! I really just needed someone to look at my swing.



    So, I really don't feel like spending another $150 on a wildcard.



    I think most people would be better off spending their money on a gym membership. Fitness is probably the bigger barrier to a solid golf swing for the average weekend golfer.
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  • SNIPERBBBSNIPERBBB Hit Ball Hard SE OhioMembers Posts: 2,208 ✭✭

    Lamb wrote:


    Teaching is an art. I don't believe many instructors have mastered this art.




    I agree with this. The PGA sucks at training teachers




    Teaching is either something you have or you dont. Maybe it could be taught, but there should be some student teaching and observation so new teachers could get feedback.
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  • Man_O_WarMan_O_War Members Posts: 2,752 ✭✭
    it's figuring it out for self. With all the tutorials on the web etc.. going to see someone to watch you sounds too serious and assume they know how to teach... having said that...lessons path is best for fundamentals. Someone has to let you know if you are doing it right...feeling it right.
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  • J2puttsJ2putts Members Posts: 611 ✭✭
    sdandrea wrote:
    I play golf 4 days per week, so no time or money for lessons.
    That's not " no time or money for lessons. That's I rather spend my money and time on playing instead lol.
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