Golf Course Superintendent Ready to Answer Any Questions You May Have

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  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    leftyDH04 wrote:
    Why are golf courses so concerned about the geese? What makes them a problem?



    My area seems to be in the flyway as we have a ton of Canadians and they love the golf course. Makes sense to me that they are attracted to the irrigation ponds and like to forage short grasses.



    The scat is unsightly; does it create other agronomy issues? I do notice a lot of worm castings where there is a lot of goose ****. Does it harbor disease or create bigger problems?



    I really like Australia's model where they cull the kangaroo and process the meat to sell in grocery stores very inexpensively. Seems the overpopulation of geese could be handled this way.




    Because they’ll eat the turf and **** everywhere which will result in turf decline. **** is fertilizer, and too much will result in fertilizer burn. So you’ll see clusters of brown thin areas.



    You can’t kill them because the...environmentalists say so. Those geese are protected under the migratory bird act. Sometimes it is possible to get exemptions and license to kill them. Unfortunately you just have to manage them as best you can.
  • Schley Schley Love ya don't tell ya enough! Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaMembers Posts: 1,179 ✭✭
    Posted this on GCA and wanted to know BNGL and other's take:



    Maybe I haven't been paying attention or this is just the USGA showing some next generation equipment they want to see utilized more, but was just tooling around on the USGA website and stumbled onto this video highlighting "equipment for the future". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lpaEttVipw&index=1&list=PLnU5qUEfww3cOAU8iTQTUpF5S4UqhXJka
    • hybrid and electrically powered mowers/rollers
    • fully automated mowers
    • fully automated chemical spraying
    • Sensors in all equipment that is tracked my GPS to show where each piece of equipment was that day




    Is this actually being used and if so how prevalent is it?I would imagine there is a significant cost to upgrade to this new equipment, what is the break even point to pay for it over paying labor?

    Cool stuff IMO, I thought the sensors and GPS tracking could actually keep tabs on your labor to see what they were doing all day and give you some feedback on their productivity speed wise or if they are napping. grin.gif
  • howellhandmadehowellhandmade Members Posts: 755 ✭✭
    edited Jan 21, 2019 12:50pm #394
    ^^^



    Very interesting. It doesn't seem either surprising or inappropriate that a course's largest expense would be labor. One of the things I like about playing golf is that it keeps my dollar turning in the community through wages. Cleaner, quieter equipment seems good all around, and I understand that many courses are stressed financially, but the course's value to the community as an employer is important. Although, the allure of having mowing done at night so we early morning players wouldn't push the crews is strong.
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,958 ✭✭
    Before BNGL, because he will know way more than me but a few things.



    - Crews don’t nap, generally every task has a rough time associated with it and most crews are way overworked. As for tracking equipment i’ll give you an example, i’m The slowest greens mower on the crew, 1 course takes 5-5.5 and the other takes 5.5-6. We have one guy who finishes each about a half hour early and the other guy is in between us. One day I asked the asst why i’m So slow and he responded “because you take the time to do what you’re supposed to do, you fix every ball mark and you are the first person i’ve seen use the whip. Moral, faster isn’t always better.



    - GPS sprayers are the future but the vast majority of courses can’t buy new technology.



    - GPS automated mowers are the future but we are still quite a ways off from them being the standard.



    Also, many Supers (i’ll Say the older generation) are hesitant to change and are fairly set in their ways. For example, we still use ice picks to repair ball marks. I hate them but it’s what we do.
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,958 ✭✭


    ^^^



    Very interesting. It doesn't seem either surprising or inappropriate that a course's largest expense would be labor. One of the things I like about playing golf is that it keeps my dollar turning in the community through wages. Cleaner, quieter equipment seems good all around, and I understand that many courses are stressed financially, but the course's value to the community as an employer is important. Although, the allure of having mowing done at night so we early morning players wouldn't push the crews is strong.




    I know of a few courses that use automated mowers but they still go out in the morning and need someone to chaperone accompany them. Often that person does ball marks, green side bunkers and then dumps the basket.



    One thing about night mowing is if something goes wrong there is no one there to fix, stop or change things. I.e, the mower gets a hydraulic leak (worst nightmare) does it shut off automatically? Does it pull off the green and park? Does it shut down on the green?
  • chris975dchris975d GeorgiaClubWRX Posts: 1,921 ClubWRX
    mallrat wrote:


    Before BNGL, because he will know way more than me but a few things.



    - Crews don't nap, generally every task has a rough time associated with it and most crews are way overworked. As for tracking equipment i'll give you an example, i'm The slowest greens mower on the crew, 1 course takes 5-5.5 and the other takes 5.5-6. We have one guy who finishes each about a half hour early and the other guy is in between us. One day I asked the asst why i'm So slow and he responded "because you take the time to do what you're supposed to do, you fix every ball mark and you are the first person i've seen use the whip. Moral, faster isn't always better.



    - GPS sprayers are the future but the vast majority of courses can't buy new technology.



    - GPS automated mowers are the future but we are still quite a ways off from them being the standard.



    Also, many Supers (i'll Say the older generation) are hesitant to change and are fairly set in their ways. For example, we still use ice picks to repair ball marks. I hate them but it's what we do.




    As a course general manager who works closely with my super, a lot of this is true. I'm at the daily fee level, far from where BNGL is, but equipment is VERY expensive, especially the "cutting edge" stuff (unintended pun). I'm obviously heavily involved with my super and equipment manager on budgeting and purchasing of new equipment, and even though I've been doing this for 25 years, I'm still sometimes shocked at the cost of new equipment when we price it out. At the costs associated with some of the newer tech equipment (automated mowers, for one), even once they get to the point of being a true option, it would be many years before courses at the daily fee level could implement them. I'm currently budgeting for what will be a light yearly equipment expenditure this upcoming year (my fiscal year begins July 1) of 3 mowers, and its' still going to be a $150K spend, easy, unless I opt for low hour preowned stuff.



    And yes, crews at any course that's still making a go of it DO NOT nap. Probably some of the most overworked and underappreciated workers in any industry. Most maintenance crews in golf are way understaffed compared to the levels they really need. I'm out as much as possible helping my crew in any way that I can, whether that's setting pins, mowing greens, rough, running backpack blowers, etc. I try to have my entire staff, even the proshop employees, involved as much as necessary if possible.



    Sorry BNGL for stepping into your thread. But I have really enjoyed reading and following it, as my first love and position in the golf business is/was on the maintenance side, and you give insight into a level of the golf course industry that I have yet to experience.
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  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,958 ✭✭
    ^^^^



    One more thing to expand upon is the timing of the equipment and when it will be purchased or look at it like a car. We generally run our equipment for 10-12 years then rotate 1/2 into a specific purpose piece of equipment and sell or trade in the rest. An example is our old riding greens mowers we kept all 3 and turned 2 into a muncher (we use them on the greens the first week after topdressing until we get to standard mow height), and 1 is now a collections/approach mower.



    I am lucky in that i’m At a course with a very nice budget and backed by Troon, but we still make do in some areas. One positive is that we are probably the only positive mainanence department because we are lumped in with landscape.
  • chris975dchris975d GeorgiaClubWRX Posts: 1,921 ClubWRX
    mallrat wrote:


    ^^^^



    One more thing to expand upon is the timing of the equipment and when it will be purchased or look at it like a car. We generally run our equipment for 10-12 years then rotate 1/2 into a specific purpose piece of equipment and sell or trade in the rest. An example is our old riding greens mowers we kept all 3 and turned 2 into a muncher (we use them on the greens the first week after topdressing until we get to standard mow height), and 1 is now a collections/approach mower.



    I am lucky in that i'm At a course with a very nice budget and backed by Troon, but we still make do in some areas. One positive is that we are probably the only positive mainanence department because we are lumped in with landscape.




    That is something that we (me, super, and equipment manager) have been working on this Winter...a total redo of a comprehensive equipment replacement schedule. Looking at current hour totals, estimated yearly hour accumulations, and EOL hour marks for all. Looking at where we need to add equipment to slow down overall wear on that category (greens mowers, trim mowers, fairway mowers, rough mowers, etc), what we can do to prolong life, where we need to replace, newer tech mowers that might be more efficient (i.e, faster), whether we need to trade in certain pieces while they still have value, or keep them and re-purpose them to another lighter duty task, etc. I've been blessed in the last year and a half to pick up one of the best equipment managers in the area, and his knowledge and experience has been invaluable. Has REALLY helped us to be a more efficient course, and to put forth a much better product to the customer.
    TaylorMade 9* M5 w/GD AD-IZ 6
    TaylorMade M5 3-wood
    TaylorMade M5 5-wood
    Srixon H85 4
    Srixon 5-PW, AW Z585 w/Project X LZ 6.0
    Cleveland RTX4 54*, 58*
    TaylorMade Spider X Copper
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    chris975d wrote:
    mallrat wrote:


    ^^^^



    One more thing to expand upon is the timing of the equipment and when it will be purchased or look at it like a car. We generally run our equipment for 10-12 years then rotate 1/2 into a specific purpose piece of equipment and sell or trade in the rest. An example is our old riding greens mowers we kept all 3 and turned 2 into a muncher (we use them on the greens the first week after topdressing until we get to standard mow height), and 1 is now a collections/approach mower.



    I am lucky in that i'm At a course with a very nice budget and backed by Troon, but we still make do in some areas. One positive is that we are probably the only positive mainanence department because we are lumped in with landscape.




    That is something that we (me, super, and equipment manager) have been working on this Winter...a total redo of a comprehensive equipment replacement schedule. Looking at current hour totals, estimated yearly hour accumulations, and EOL hour marks for all. Looking at where we need to add equipment to slow down overall wear on that category (greens mowers, trim mowers, fairway mowers, rough mowers, etc), what we can do to prolong life, where we need to replace, newer tech mowers that might be more efficient (i.e, faster), whether we need to trade in certain pieces while they still have value, or keep them and re-purpose them to another lighter duty task, etc. I've been blessed in the last year and a half to pick up one of the best equipment managers in the area, and his knowledge and experience has been invaluable. Has REALLY helped us to be a more efficient course, and to put forth a much better product to the customer.




    Messaged you.
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,958 ✭✭
    BNGL



    Sorry for stealing your thread a few times and answering questions for you, just like throwing in my $.02



  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    Schley wrote:
    Posted this on GCA and wanted to know BNGL and other's take:



    Maybe I haven't been paying attention or this is just the USGA showing some next generation equipment they want to see utilized more, but was just tooling around on the USGA website and stumbled onto this video highlighting "equipment for the future". [url="
    • hybrid and electrically powered mowers/rollers
    • fully automated mowers
    • fully automated chemical spraying
    • Sensors in all equipment that is tracked my GPS to show where each piece of equipment was that day




    Is this actually being used and if so how prevalent is it?I would imagine there is a significant cost to upgrade to this new equipment, what is the break even point to pay for it over paying labor?

    Cool stuff IMO, I thought the sensors and GPS tracking could actually keep tabs on your labor to see what they were doing all day and give you some feedback on their productivity speed wise or if they are napping. grin.gif




    As with any industry technological advancements have made an impact in the ways we do our jobs. Big AG is responsible for most of them, GPS guided spray rigs automatically turn individual nozzles on and off to save product (isn’t much per spray, but over a season it will be; I always calculate 10 percent in overspray so if I can save that every time that’s a chunk of change), cameras that work in conjunction with nozzles will now identify weeds and target it with a precise dab of herbicide without affecting surrounding crops (they’re running trials with 2-4D in cotton fields now). Yes there are automated mowers, even automated cup cutters (that one was a stretch when I saw it at the show, cool idea but...). But as it stands right now, I still need a person there with the machine, so why not have the person mow it by themselves? I’m not opposed to tech in our industry, I think it’s exciting some of the stuff that will come out in the future, but it has to be practical and affordable first and foremost.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    One of the bigger tech things we’ve done recently is the implantation of labor tracker. Gone is the whiteboard with grids and names, now I’ve got a 48 inch flatscreen smart TV that we use to assign jobs and track hours. The best thing about it is that we can update it from the course (don’t have to go to the office) and put pictures up of specific areas to call attention too. It will chart hours as well, but it’s hours we assign to a particular job so after sometime we will be able to get a full list of times for jobs.
  • James the Hogan FanJames the Hogan Fan Members Posts: 493 ✭✭
    Hi, maybe asked or maybe not but; on courses that are snowbound in winter, how do the greens handle the snow? I would like to know specifically about bentgrass but other types too. There comes a point at which I assume you can’t cut them anymore, and then they are covered by snow for 2-3 months. Once they thaw what is the process for getting them back to playing shape? Is it a daily reduction in height for a few weeks?



    Thanks for your time!
    Golfing in Finland!
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    Hi, maybe asked or maybe not but; on courses that are snowbound in winter, how do the greens handle the snow? I would like to know specifically about bentgrass but other types too. There comes a point at which I assume you can’t cut them anymore, and then they are covered by snow for 2-3 months. Once they thaw what is the process for getting them back to playing shape? Is it a daily reduction in height for a few weeks?



    Thanks for your time!






    Snow actually isn’t too bad, because snow actually protects the plant from wind desiccation and allows gases to flow between the air and surface. The big problem is ice. Ice forms an impermeable layer that traps gases(anaerobic) and when they build up in sufficient amounts the turf will show damage particularly as it starts to wake up. If I was running a club and had to worry about winter, I’d be checking the surfaces regularly to see if ice has formed and break it up if necessary then cover it with snow, brush, or even sand. I would know to break it up based on smell, if I detect a sulfur smell I know the turf is hurting. If there’s no smell then we’re probably ok.



    Interestingly enough creeping bent strains possess excellent hardiness to colder temps and conditions, I’m more worried with other species such as annual blue grasses as they begin to exhibit signs of decline earlier typically 40 continuous days.



    So now you have made it through, you think and the snow/ice starts to melt. You have to make sure it drains. Because what can happen is the water freezes at the surface and damages the crown. The crown is literally the plant, what you see and play on is merely the leaf blade, the crown is important because that is where the energy reserves for winter are stored and what the plant will use to start growing again when temps warm up. So if that gets damaged...you’re in trouble. (Desiccation refers to the crown drying out).



    There’s no perfect solution to winter damage, we can only do the best that we can and through a good plan implemented before the colder temperatures move in, examine rates of N-P-K applications and adjust accordingly, break up ice when present etc.





    As far as mowing is concerned, heading into winter the plant is slowing down (temperatures are cooler, the days are shorter) meaning less growth, less growth means less mowing. Even if it was trapped and completely left alone until spring thaw. I haven’t personally had to do anything with ice in a long time so I’m not sure the process. But if I had to speculate I’d pump the plant full of N and K and some fungicides. N would get the plant going, K would be just general plant health. I’d raise the heights a little bit probably start at .125 then gradually take it down to season height. Reason for that would be to not stress it and allow the plant to grow on its on without us destroying its early gains.
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,958 ✭✭
    edited Feb 8, 2019 12:18am #406
    We start at .145 with the end goal being .095 and it takes us almost 2 months to get there. We are all bent and after the last mow we do a wall to wall snow mold app. We actually start rolling before we start mowing. I may be wrong but the surface layers will start thawing and make the course softer than desired. We actually put a roll on the greens a few weeks ago. It’s more an issue of getting the desired firmness vs our mow height.



    As BNGL said we don’t do anything for snow as long as the grass hasn’t woken up. We do our last mow based upon the forecast but usually about 2 weeks before the 1st deep freeze. Right now ice isn’t a big deal because it normally melts within 2-3 days. However come late Feb - early March we scramble to remove the snow and break up any ice. That is generally around when the grass starts coming alive. I’m not sure of the first contents of the first spray but we do a pretty heavy dose of granular gypsum on the tees and fairways about 2 weeks after everything thaws.



    Edit... the .095 green height is only used about 3 weeks out of the year. Mostly .105
  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Members Posts: 1,069 ✭✭
    The winter kill I see here is the result of snow melting and then refreezing as ice at night. Exactly as has been said, ice is the issue, however it forms.



    Two or three years ago this whole area had several inches of snow on the ground, already a rarity, that melted during the day somewhat and then froze at night. The outcome was dead spots of turf in any low spot or any drain type area of the fairway. Took forever that summer for the bermuda and zoysia (depending upon the course) to fill back in. Bermuda was more affected by it than zoysia was my experience. Zoysia tends to green up sooner and go dormant later here. Maybe it is a little more resistant to winter kill as well.
  • ArtMBgolfArtMBgolf Members Posts: 371 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:





    It seems like green covers are becoming more popular after the winter kill of Spring 2018. Do you like them?



    The photo attached is from a course in South Carolina, that isn't maintained well.

    The greens are 2 years old, Champions and in dormant Feb condition.

    I got the photo from a friend, so I did not see this myself. He said most greens have the

    brighter green grass spots.



    If it were summer, I would say the spots are common bermuda invading, but they are probably too new

    for that. What kind of grass or weed would you call that?



    It kinda looks like a wild rye, bluegrass, etc. It appears to be spreading. Thanks!
  • Matt JMatt J Members Posts: 8,735 ✭✭
    Interesting stuff. I've always wondered how the real high country courses deal with the freeze thaw. You hear about cases, like the Running Y, here in southern Oregon, that lost greens last season. I never thought too much about dormancy. I guess that once the greens thaw and begin to sprout again is when you get problems? I heard they were under new ownership and did not cover the greens as the previous super had done during certain conditions.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    ArtMBgolf wrote:
    BNGL wrote:





    It seems like green covers are becoming more popular after the winter kill of Spring 2018. Do you like them?



    The photo attached is from a course in South Carolina, that isn't maintained well.

    The greens are 2 years old, Champions and in dormant Feb condition.

    I got the photo from a friend, so I did not see this myself. He said most greens have the

    brighter green grass spots.



    If it were summer, I would say the spots are common bermuda invading, but they are probably too new

    for that. What kind of grass or weed would you call that?



    It kinda looks like a wild rye, bluegrass, etc. It appears to be spreading. Thanks!




    I e never used covers/tarps personally so I can’t really attest to their effectiveness only the idea behind the principle.



    Yeah that’s not good (referencing the picture) uhm that is high amounts of contamination. Without seeing it up close I can’t say what it is. It looks similar to paspalum contamination that you’ll see here in south Florida.
  • ArtMBgolfArtMBgolf Members Posts: 371 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:

    ArtMBgolf wrote:
    BNGL wrote:



    It seems like green covers are becoming more popular after the winter kill of Spring 2018. Do you like them?



    The photo attached is from a course in South Carolina, that isn't maintained well.

    The greens are 2 years old, Champions and in dormant Feb condition.

    I got the photo from a friend, so I did not see this myself. He said most greens have the

    brighter green grass spots.



    If it were summer, I would say the spots are common bermuda invading, but they are probably too new

    for that. What kind of grass or weed would you call that?



    It kinda looks like a wild rye, bluegrass, etc. It appears to be spreading. Thanks!




    I e never used covers/tarps personally so I can’t really attest to their effectiveness only the idea behind the principle.



    Yeah that’s not good (referencing the picture) uhm that is high amounts of contamination. Without seeing it up close I can’t say what it is. It looks similar to paspalum contamination that you’ll see here in south Florida.


    Contamination sounds like any other grass/weed getting in there.

    What is paspalum contamination? Is it the paspalum going crazy?
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    ArtMBgolf wrote:
    BNGL wrote:

    ArtMBgolf wrote:
    BNGL wrote:



    It seems like green covers are becoming more popular after the winter kill of Spring 2018. Do you like them?



    The photo attached is from a course in South Carolina, that isn't maintained well.

    The greens are 2 years old, Champions and in dormant Feb condition.

    I got the photo from a friend, so I did not see this myself. He said most greens have the

    brighter green grass spots.



    If it were summer, I would say the spots are common bermuda invading, but they are probably too new

    for that. What kind of grass or weed would you call that?



    It kinda looks like a wild rye, bluegrass, etc. It appears to be spreading. Thanks!




    I e never used covers/tarps personally so I can’t really attest to their effectiveness only the idea behind the principle.



    Yeah that’s not good (referencing the picture) uhm that is high amounts of contamination. Without seeing it up close I can’t say what it is. It looks similar to paspalum contamination that you’ll see here in south Florida.


    Contamination sounds like any other grass/weed getting in there.

    What is paspalum contamination? Is it the paspalum going crazy?




    Nah just it’s not 100 percent Champion bermuda. So say the green surface is 10000 square feet, and you have newly installed guaranteed warrantied Champion turf. There’s no contaminants, but if I have a patch here and there then it’s generally referred to as contamination.



    In the south Bermuda’s and Paspalum are competing against each other because they are suited for the same environments relatively speaking. So you can get little patches here and there that need to be addressed before the turn into big patches like what I think I see in your picture. Paspalum is a very deep rooting plant with strong rhizomes that grow beneath the surface other cultivars have rhizomes that grow above the surface (sometimes called stolons) which make them easier to manage.
  • vaca22vaca22 Commander In Beef Members Posts: 677 ✭✭
    My friend is one of 5 assistants being considered for th superintendent's job at his course. I was considering writing a letter of recommendation to the committee, but wasn't sure if I might be overstepping or making the effort seem desperate.



    Is this advisable?
  • augustgolfaugustgolf Golf with dignity Coastal NCMembers Posts: 3,902 ✭✭
    vaca22 wrote:


    My friend is one of 5 assistants being considered for th superintendent's job at his course. I was considering writing a letter of recommendation to the committee, but wasn't sure if I might be overstepping or making the effort seem desperate.



    Is this advisable?




    Just my 2 cents worth, but - how would your relationship be with the other assistants, should your friend get the job?



    I would suggest this: I am sure that he was required/asked to submit a resume, along with references. Perhaps, you could ask him, and if this is the case, suggest he list you as one of the references.



    Good luck to him & you. Please keep us informed.
    Pings from the beginning

    OGA member 1415
    or is it 1514...
    I don't remember exactly
  • vaca22vaca22 Commander In Beef Members Posts: 677 ✭✭
    augustgolf wrote:

    vaca22 wrote:


    My friend is one of 5 assistants being considered for th superintendent's job at his course. I was considering writing a letter of recommendation to the committee, but wasn't sure if I might be overstepping or making the effort seem desperate.



    Is this advisable?




    Just my 2 cents worth, but - how would your relationship be with the other assistants, should your friend get the job?



    I would suggest this: I am sure that he was required/asked to submit a resume, along with references. Perhaps, you could ask him, and if this is the case, suggest he list you as one of the references.



    Good luck to him & you. Please keep us informed.




    I'm not sure if I understand the question about the relationship with the other assistants. The other 4 are from other courses, 2 of them out of state, so I don't know them personally.



    But I see your point, in that I could have been listed as a reference. The purpose of the letter really was to highlight his passion for the craft, since he has been with the club for over 15 years. As others have come and gone, he has remained, and no one knows the property like he does. He has suggested ideas and changes over the years that he would implement if he held that position.



    But I guess that's for him to expand on when he's being interviewed image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
  • augustgolfaugustgolf Golf with dignity Coastal NCMembers Posts: 3,902 ✭✭
    vaca22 wrote:

    augustgolf wrote:

    vaca22 wrote:


    My friend is one of 5 assistants being considered for th superintendent's job at his course. I was considering writing a letter of recommendation to the committee, but wasn't sure if I might be overstepping or making the effort seem desperate.



    Is this advisable?




    Just my 2 cents worth, but - how would your relationship be with the other assistants, should your friend get the job?



    I would suggest this: I am sure that he was required/asked to submit a resume, along with references. Perhaps, you could ask him, and if this is the case, suggest he list you as one of the references.



    Good luck to him & you. Please keep us informed.




    I'm not sure if I understand the question about the relationship with the other assistants. The other 4 are from other courses, 2 of them out of state, so I don't know them personally.



    But I see your point, in that I could have been listed as a reference. The purpose of the letter really was to highlight his passion for the craft, since he has been with the club for over 15 years. As others have come and gone, he has remained, and no one knows the property like he does. He has suggested ideas and changes over the years that he would implement if he held that position.



    But I guess that's for him to expand on when he's being interviewed image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />




    I gotcha - was thinking that the course had 5 assistants, and that the club was looking to hire from within.



    Too much liquor, too little sleep
    Pings from the beginning

    OGA member 1415
    or is it 1514...
    I don't remember exactly
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    vaca22 wrote:
    My friend is one of 5 assistants being considered for th superintendent's job at his course. I was considering writing a letter of recommendation to the committee, but wasn't sure if I might be overstepping or making the effort seem desperate.



    Is this advisable?




    I can’t really say I can’t imagine it would hurt or help significantly either way. If you’re a part of the club the. It would definitely mean more than if you weren’t. Attend the committee meetings and ask about the open position, and who’s being considered.
  • DestroyerDestroyer Members Posts: 334 ✭✭
    OK, i've got one for ya. i go to my brother in laws course to play. i enjoy walking and so does he. i use a push cart. i go to the pro shop and pay for my round. pro asks if i'm riding and i tell him i'm walking with my push cart. he tells me i can't use my push cart that i have to rent one of there's. i politely tell him that i have no problem paying their rental fee but would like to use mine. he tells me no way, your cart has grass from other courses on it and that can contaminate their course. at this point i am puzzled and look at him at asked if i can wear my shoes cause my shoes have grass on them. he looks at me and says those are the rules so i just paid for the cart and road. but really, grass from another course?
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,958 ✭✭
    Where are you located? There are many stories of courses that blow your shoes off before entering a course to keep Poa seed heads away.
  • DestroyerDestroyer Members Posts: 334 ✭✭
    outskirts of chattanooga, tn. the course was council fire. it's bermuda grass
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,685 ✭✭
    Destroyer wrote:
    OK, i've got one for ya. i go to my brother in laws course to play. i enjoy walking and so does he. i use a push cart. i go to the pro shop and pay for my round. pro asks if i'm riding and i tell him i'm walking with my push cart. he tells me i can't use my push cart that i have to rent one of there's. i politely tell him that i have no problem paying their rental fee but would like to use mine. he tells me no way, your cart has grass from other courses on it and that can contaminate their course. at this point i am puzzled and look at him at asked if i can wear my shoes cause my shoes have grass on them. he looks at me and says those are the rules so i just paid for the cart and road. but really, grass from another course?




    He’s full of s***. Just looking for extra revenue. I mean on the surface his claim is valid, but is his course in a dome? Completely isolated and controlled from the surrounding area? I don’t worry about that, you’re going to get far more contamination from seeds blown by the wind and dropped by animals that **** on the property than by a golfers push cart or golf spikes.



    I only worry about it one time, when we overseed the tee tops at our practice facility. And even then it’s not the shoes (lest they’re wet) it’s the spreaders. Well use 6 rotary and two drop spreaders that will be thoroughly cleaned before heading back on to the course, where we don’t overseed.
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