Is Bent Grass Becoming Obsolete?

dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,019 ✭✭
...at least south of the Mason-Dixon line



Let me preface by stating that being from NJ I love bent greens and generally prefer them over other grasses. Still, I've really been impressed with the improvements/advancements in the newer strains of Bermuda in the past 10 years.



I'm in the process of moving to FL from NJ, staying for about 1 week in Greenville, SC before heading down to South FL. Played Furman U course today and the Bermuda greens (newer strain) were exceptional despite nearly 2 inches of rain overnight. I've also played on some surprisingly fast and smooth surfaces at a number of clubs in FL including Tequesta CC, Fox Club, and Medalist. All stimped faster than 12 with no real grain to worry about.



I'm told Bermuda is generally less expensive than Bent, but I'm not an expert. Either way, agronomy has come a long way since I started playing in the early 90s and i would not be surprised to see places like Augusta National eventually switch over to these newer strains of Bermuda.



Thoughts?
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Comments

  • davep043davep043 Members Posts: 3,010 ✭✭
    Lots of courses in the Pinehurst area have converted to new strains of dwarf Bermuda, and they're great in that climate. The're more heat-tolerant than bent, and I believe more drought-tolerant as well. On the other hand, they have to be covered during periods of frost, which does require some significant labor. They also do go dormant, although they're still fine to play on. In my relatively uneducated opinion, Bermuda greens will become very prevalent further north than they ever were before, but there will be limits to that. Bent will remain the grass of choice in more northern regions.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    dpb5031 wrote:
    ...at least south of the Mason-Dixon line



    Let me preface by stating that being from NJ I love bent greens and generally prefer them over other grasses. Still, I've really been impressed with the improvements/advancements in the newer strains of Bermuda in the past 10 years.



    I'm in the process of moving to FL from NJ, staying for about 1 week in Greenville, SC before heading down to South FL. Played Furman U course today and the Bermuda greens (newer strain) were exceptional despite nearly 2 inches of rain overnight. I've also played on some surprisingly fast and smooth surfaces at a number of clubs in FL including Tequesta CC, Fox Club, and Medalist. All stimped faster than 12 with no real grain to worry about.



    I'm told Bermuda is generally less expensive than Bent, but I'm not an expert. Either way, agronomy has come a long way since I started playing in the early 90s and i would not be surprised to see places like Augusta National eventually switch over to these newer strains of Bermuda.



    Thoughts?




    No it’s not obsolete and yes I would definitely be surprised to see Augusta go to anything other than PennA1 bent on their greens.



    ANGC is the exception to every environmental, financial, agronomical challenge in the world. (They can handle it better than others, even though their budget isn’t unlimited if it’s needed it’ll be done promptly and properly). They’re still susceptible to downturns, but they can make it happen, just like any other high level club.



  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,019 ✭✭
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.
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    Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
    Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
    Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
    Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
    Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
    Taylormade TP5X Ball
  • BrianMcGBrianMcG Members Posts: 2,224 ✭✭
    Pretty much every course in the south east is converting to that champion Bermuda or whatever it's called. They can really take a beating and still roll nice. The greens near me barley leave a ball mark with full shots they are so dense.
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  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    dpb5031 wrote:
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.




    Yeah these new ultra dwarf strains are vastly superior to those from years ago. And if you’re at a tournament course, or high level private, you’re not seeing much effect from grain and the golf ball. Regardless of what every golf announcer says, the lead blade is so shrunken up in the weeks leading up to an event, that its effect on the roll of a golf ball is infinitesimal.



    Cultural practices help mitigate grain, top dressing which helps to stand the leaf blade up, tournament bedknifes which again help further stand up the leaf blade. We will shrink the leaf blade by starving it, of both nutrients and hydration, and introducing chemicals that stunt the the growth of the plant. Verticutting will help thin out the canopy removing excess tissue that will exert friction on the golf ball influencing its movements across a putting surface. All those are done to provide the best playing surface, not just a healthy resilient surface.
  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,019 ✭✭
    BNGL, are you a super.?
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  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    dpb5031 wrote:
    BNGL, are you a super.?




    Yes.
  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,019 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    BNGL, are you a super.?




    Yes.




    Brutal job...I've worked closely with our guy over the years as a greens committee chair and BOD member. I honestly dont know how you guys do it! 👏
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    Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
    Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
    Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
    Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
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  • fairways4lifefairways4life Members Posts: 1,553 ✭✭
    BrianMcG wrote:


    Pretty much every course in the south east is converting to that champion Bermuda or whatever it's called. They can really take a beating and still roll nice. The greens near me barley leave a ball mark with full shots they are so dense.




    That's probably the biggest advantage in my mind. I live in NC and for the last 10 years it's just been one course after another making the conversion from bent to bermuda.



    Bent greens at high-volume public courses just got so trashed by people not fixing ball marks but the bermuda greens barely make a dent. Personally I prefer bent because I just like the way the ball reacts, spins and rolls on them. But there's no doubting the durability of the bermuda.
  • dpb5031dpb5031 Members Posts: 5,019 ✭✭
    edited Dec 2, 2018 #11

    BrianMcG wrote:


    Pretty much every course in the south east is converting to that champion Bermuda or whatever it's called. They can really take a beating and still roll nice. The greens near me barley leave a ball mark with full shots they are so dense.




    That's probably the biggest advantage in my mind. I live in NC and for the last 10 years it's just been one course after another making the conversion from bent to bermuda.



    Bent greens at high-volume public courses just got so trashed by people not fixing ball marks but the bermuda greens barely make a dent. Personally I prefer bent because I just like the way the ball reacts, spins and rolls on them. But there's no doubting the durability of the bermuda.




    Even the purest bent greens get all spiked up by the end of the day. The new tif/dwarf/eagle (or whatever it is) hardly ever show a spike mark or ball mark.



    In my experience, the very best greens regardless of region are Bent with a fair amount of dormant Poa. Not as spikey as pure bent and no perceptible grain whatsoever
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    Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
    Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
    Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
    Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
    Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
    Taylormade TP5X Ball
  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 7,778 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.




    Yeah these new ultra dwarf strains are vastly superior to those from years ago. And if you’re at a tournament course, or high level private, you’re not seeing much effect from grain and the golf ball. Regardless of what every golf announcer says, the lead blade is so shrunken up in the weeks leading up to an event, that its effect on the roll of a golf ball is infinitesimal.



    Cultural practices help mitigate grain, top dressing which helps to stand the leaf blade up, tournament bedknifes which again help further stand up the leaf blade. We will shrink the leaf blade by starving it, of both nutrients and hydration, and introducing chemicals that stunt the the growth of the plant. Verticutting will help thin out the canopy removing excess tissue that will exert friction on the golf ball influencing its movements across a putting surface. All those are done to provide the best playing surface, not just a healthy resilient surface.
    I may be misunderstanding, but the practices you describe are your normal routine? It seems counterintuitive that stress and starvation will produce a healthy green.
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,873 ✭✭
    farmer wrote:

    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.




    Yeah these new ultra dwarf strains are vastly superior to those from years ago. And if you’re at a tournament course, or high level private, you’re not seeing much effect from grain and the golf ball. Regardless of what every golf announcer says, the lead blade is so shrunken up in the weeks leading up to an event, that its effect on the roll of a golf ball is infinitesimal.



    Cultural practices help mitigate grain, top dressing which helps to stand the leaf blade up, tournament bedknifes which again help further stand up the leaf blade. We will shrink the leaf blade by starving it, of both nutrients and hydration, and introducing chemicals that stunt the the growth of the plant. Verticutting will help thin out the canopy removing excess tissue that will exert friction on the golf ball influencing its movements across a putting surface. All those are done to provide the best playing surface, not just a healthy resilient surface.
    I may be misunderstanding, but the practices you describe are your normal routine? It seems counterintuitive that stress and starvation will produce a healthy green.




    Grass is like most living things in nature in that it adapts. If you starve it but not to death it will eventually learn that is its normal. Plus healthy turf and healthy grass are not always the same thing.
  • ShilgyShilgy Members Posts: 11,288 ✭✭
    mallrat wrote:

    farmer wrote:

    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.




    Yeah these new ultra dwarf strains are vastly superior to those from years ago. And if you’re at a tournament course, or high level private, you’re not seeing much effect from grain and the golf ball. Regardless of what every golf announcer says, the lead blade is so shrunken up in the weeks leading up to an event, that its effect on the roll of a golf ball is infinitesimal.



    Cultural practices help mitigate grain, top dressing which helps to stand the leaf blade up, tournament bedknifes which again help further stand up the leaf blade. We will shrink the leaf blade by starving it, of both nutrients and hydration, and introducing chemicals that stunt the the growth of the plant. Verticutting will help thin out the canopy removing excess tissue that will exert friction on the golf ball influencing its movements across a putting surface. All those are done to provide the best playing surface, not just a healthy resilient surface.
    I may be misunderstanding, but the practices you describe are your normal routine? It seems counterintuitive that stress and starvation will produce a healthy green.




    Grass is like most living things in nature in that it adapts. If you starve it but not to death it will eventually learn that is its normal. Plus healthy turf and healthy grass are not always the same thing.
    I thought BNGL was referring to tournament prep practices. Hmm.
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  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,873 ✭✭
    I may be wrong and if I am I hope i’m Corrected. We have a guy on our crew who runs trials during the week and there’s a course in Scottsdale that waters their greens every 3rd night.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    farmer wrote:
    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.




    Yeah these new ultra dwarf strains are vastly superior to those from years ago. And if you’re at a tournament course, or high level private, you’re not seeing much effect from grain and the golf ball. Regardless of what every golf announcer says, the lead blade is so shrunken up in the weeks leading up to an event, that its effect on the roll of a golf ball is infinitesimal.



    Cultural practices help mitigate grain, top dressing which helps to stand the leaf blade up, tournament bedknifes which again help further stand up the leaf blade. We will shrink the leaf blade by starving it, of both nutrients and hydration, and introducing chemicals that stunt the the growth of the plant. Verticutting will help thin out the canopy removing excess tissue that will exert friction on the golf ball influencing its movements across a putting surface. All those are done to provide the best playing surface, not just a healthy resilient surface.
    I may be misunderstanding, but the practices you describe are your normal routine? It seems counterintuitive that stress and starvation will produce a healthy green.




    To varying degrees yes, but that is mostly referring to tournament setup.

    Shilgy wrote:
    mallrat wrote:

    farmer wrote:

    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    I remember the "old dchool" Bermuda with the wide blades and prevalent grain. The new stuff is nothing like it. Some of the best surfaces I've played in the past 3 years have been Bermuda, and I've played plenty of top level courses with Bent in the Northeast and elsewhere.




    Yeah these new ultra dwarf strains are vastly superior to those from years ago. And if you’re at a tournament course, or high level private, you’re not seeing much effect from grain and the golf ball. Regardless of what every golf announcer says, the lead blade is so shrunken up in the weeks leading up to an event, that its effect on the roll of a golf ball is infinitesimal.



    Cultural practices help mitigate grain, top dressing which helps to stand the leaf blade up, tournament bedknifes which again help further stand up the leaf blade. We will shrink the leaf blade by starving it, of both nutrients and hydration, and introducing chemicals that stunt the the growth of the plant. Verticutting will help thin out the canopy removing excess tissue that will exert friction on the golf ball influencing its movements across a putting surface. All those are done to provide the best playing surface, not just a healthy resilient surface.
    I may be misunderstanding, but the practices you describe are your normal routine? It seems counterintuitive that stress and starvation will produce a healthy green.




    Grass is like most living things in nature in that it adapts. If you starve it but not to death it will eventually learn that is its normal. Plus healthy turf and healthy grass are not always the same thing.
    I thought BNGL was referring to tournament prep practices. Hmm.




    That would be correct.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    mallrat wrote:
    I may be wrong and if I am I hope i’m Corrected. We have a guy on our crew who runs trials during the week and there’s a course in Scottsdale that waters their greens every 3rd night.




    Ideally that is the perfect situation...ideally. When you withhold water from above, it forces the plant to dive to find it, basically the roots with start to move down to find the water table. Which is what you want, a healthy root system, but you don’t wanna see signs of desiccation on the surface. So it’s a balance of things to consider.
  • smashdnsmashdn Let's cut them trees down. Posts: 935 ✭✭
    There will still be courses in the south east under unique circumstances that I cannot see going to bermuda. Higher elevations (Cumberland Plateau courses in TN as one example) snow bird destinations (Fairfield Glade) muni type operations with multiple courses where resources are shared (it would be problematic to turn over 27 or 36 all at once to bermuda).



    I would guess I am about as far north as the bermuda greens go (for now). One of the privates 20 mins to the north of me converted last year or the year before. Prior to that the bermuda green courses were confined to the far western end of the state that is lower in elevation.
  • davep043davep043 Members Posts: 3,010 ✭✭
    smashdn wrote:


    There will still be courses in the south east under unique circumstances that I cannot see going to bermuda. Higher elevations (Cumberland Plateau courses in TN as one example) snow bird destinations (Fairfield Glade) muni type operations with multiple courses where resources are shared (it would be problematic to turn over 27 or 36 all at once to bermuda).




    In the Pinehurst area, the "snowbird" phenomenon made it reasonable to change the greens over during the summer, when demand is relatively low. I know that at both Talamore and MidSouth the new greens required only a 60-day grow-in period, and were reportedly in very good shape as soon as the courses reopened. I played at MidSouth just one month after the course reopened, and the new Champion greens were outstanding, firm, durable, pretty fast, and very true. As you say, for courses in areas that depend on the income from summer play, its a different situation.
  • J13J13 Dad golf Members Posts: 15,262 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:

    dpb5031 wrote:
    ...at least south of the Mason-Dixon line



    Let me preface by stating that being from NJ I love bent greens and generally prefer them over other grasses. Still, I've really been impressed with the improvements/advancements in the newer strains of Bermuda in the past 10 years.



    I'm in the process of moving to FL from NJ, staying for about 1 week in Greenville, SC before heading down to South FL. Played Furman U course today and the Bermuda greens (newer strain) were exceptional despite nearly 2 inches of rain overnight. I've also played on some surprisingly fast and smooth surfaces at a number of clubs in FL including Tequesta CC, Fox Club, and Medalist. All stimped faster than 12 with no real grain to worry about.



    I'm told Bermuda is generally less expensive than Bent, but I'm not an expert. Either way, agronomy has come a long way since I started playing in the early 90s and i would not be surprised to see places like Augusta National eventually switch over to these newer strains of Bermuda.



    Thoughts?




    No it’s not obsolete and yes I would definitely be surprised to see Augusta go to anything other than PennA1 bent on their greens.



    ANGC is the exception to every environmental, financial, agronomical challenge in the world. (They can handle it better than others, even though their budget isn’t unlimited if it’s needed it’ll be done promptly and properly). They’re still susceptible to downturns, but they can make it happen, just like any other high level club.




    My club has A1bent and there's nothing like them. With that said it's not a best in extreme heat and you need to be careful but with temps between 50-85* there's nothing better.
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  • GSDriverGSDriver Members Posts: 576 ✭✭
    Fortunately the new hybrids play nearly like bent, but are much more heat/drought tolerant. Most courses here in N. TX have replaced bent grass, which just couldn't take the summer heat. No more fans around greens, yay!



    I do miss playing off bent grass fairways, but unless have to head north, I likely won't see those again.
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  • airjammerairjammer Members Posts: 971 ✭✭
    The only negative I can say about Bermuda greens is that the previous hole locations don’t heal up quickly. At one local course you can see 5+ old hole locations per green. We always joke when having to putt over one that this is one of the original hole locations when the course opened.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    airjammer wrote:
    The only negative I can say about Bermuda greens is that the previous hole locations don’t heal up quickly. At one local course you can see 5+ old hole locations per green. We always joke when having to putt over one that this is one of the original hole locations when the course opened.




    Where is this course located?



    Only reason I ask is because if you don’t match the surrounding grain correctly to the plug that’s why you’ll see it for a few months especially when the grass isn’t growing as much as in summer. I’ll try to post pictures of some greens with when the plugs were done properly. Because You shouldn’t notice
  • mallratmallrat Members Posts: 2,873 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:

    airjammer wrote:
    The only negative I can say about Bermuda greens is that the previous hole locations don’t heal up quickly. At one local course you can see 5+ old hole locations per green. We always joke when having to putt over one that this is one of the original hole locations when the course opened.




    Where is this course located?



    Only reason I ask is because if you don’t match the surrounding grain correctly to the plug that’s why you’ll see it for a few months especially when the grass isn’t growing as much as in summer. I’ll try to post pictures of some greens with when the plugs were done properly. Because You shouldn’t notice




    Could it also be sloppy plugs that aren’t necessarily level and or mended properly?
  • bradskibradski Members Posts: 2,319 ✭✭
    love this conversation. I would see Bent at many High end courses in the northwest but it ends up being a lot of work keeping the Poa from overtaking it. There are new chemicals that are supposed to do this but I personally thing bent it's awesome unless maintained well.
  • tideridertiderider Members Posts: 1,471 ✭✭

    BrianMcG wrote:


    Pretty much every course in the south east is converting to that champion Bermuda or whatever it's called. They can really take a beating and still roll nice. The greens near me barley leave a ball mark with full shots they are so dense.




    That's probably the biggest advantage in my mind. I live in NC and for the last 10 years it's just been one course after another making the conversion from bent to bermuda.



    Bent greens at high-volume public courses just got so trashed by people not fixing ball marks but the bermuda greens barely make a dent. Personally I prefer bent because I just like the way the ball reacts, spins and rolls on them. But there's no doubting the durability of the bermuda.




    yep ... but i rarely hear any starter remind golfers to fix their ball marks ... that would make a decent dent in the pitchmarks, imo ...
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    mallrat wrote:
    BNGL wrote:

    airjammer wrote:
    The only negative I can say about Bermuda greens is that the previous hole locations don’t heal up quickly. At one local course you can see 5+ old hole locations per green. We always joke when having to putt over one that this is one of the original hole locations when the course opened.




    Where is this course located?



    Only reason I ask is because if you don’t match the surrounding grain correctly to the plug that’s why you’ll see it for a few months especially when the grass isn’t growing as much as in summer. I’ll try to post pictures of some greens with when the plugs were done properly. Because You shouldn’t notice




    Could it also be sloppy plugs that aren’t necessarily level and or mended properly?




    True. If it’s not level enough it could get scalped by the mowers. I was just hoping more common sense would prevail, in that someone would realize that hey that plug is way too high I can’t leave it like that.
  • caniac6caniac6 Members Posts: 2,655 ✭✭
    The course where I play has bent greens, and I'm going to play tomorrow morning. The course up the street has Bermuda greens, and they covered their greens today in anticipation of a cold night. It's going to be cold in the AM, but I walk and bundle up, so it will be tolerable, but I couldn't play if we had Bermuda.
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,557 ✭✭
    caniac6 wrote:
    The course where I play has bent greens, and I'm going to play tomorrow morning. The course up the street has Bermuda greens, and they covered their greens today in anticipation of a cold night. It's going to be cold in the AM, but I walk and bundle up, so it will be tolerable, but I couldn't play if we had Bermuda.




    While I understand your sentiments, I’d just like to point out that certain species don’t necessarily require tarps. Golfers have just generally accepted that tarps are required, I go both ways on it. Every winter is different, sometimes you come out of it fine other times you have major problems and both times you might have used tarps. There’s plenty of research on both sides of tarps debate. But most of the decision making rests on a couple factors;



    budget, tarps can be ridiculously expensive figure 40k and that would last 5 years tops 3 years reasonably (they tear easily). Factor an additional 20k for extra labor to put them out and remove them, fix them etc.



    Surrounding environment, if I have a green that sits in a bowl I would have to trench the **** out of the green surrounds to ensure that water moved away from the greens.



    But I haven’t ever had to tarp greens, so take that with a grain of salt, but from what I know and have read about...idk just rambling I guess.

  • North TexasNorth Texas Members Posts: 4,006 ✭✭
    BNGL wrote:

    caniac6 wrote:
    The course where I play has bent greens, and I'm going to play tomorrow morning. The course up the street has Bermuda greens, and they covered their greens today in anticipation of a cold night. It's going to be cold in the AM, but I walk and bundle up, so it will be tolerable, but I couldn't play if we had Bermuda.




    While I understand your sentiments, I’d just like to point out that certain species don’t necessarily require tarps. Golfers have just generally accepted that tarps are required, I go both ways on it. Every winter is different, sometimes you come out of it fine other times you have major problems and both times you might have used tarps. There’s plenty of research on both sides of tarps debate. But most of the decision making rests on a couple factors;



    budget, tarps can be ridiculously expensive figure 40k and that would last 5 years tops 3 years reasonably (they tear easily). Factor an additional 20k for extra labor to put them out and remove them, fix them etc.



    Surrounding environment, if I have a green that sits in a bowl I would have to trench the **** out of the green surrounds to ensure that water moved away from the greens.



    But I haven’t ever had to tarp greens, so take that with a grain of salt, but from what I know and have read about...idk just rambling I guess.




    Interesting. What species of bermuda don't have to be covered?
  • whynotgolfwhynotgolf Members Posts: 59 ✭✭
    dpb5031 wrote:


    ...at least south of the Mason-Dixon line



    Let me preface by stating that being from NJ I love bent greens and generally prefer them over other grasses. Still, I've really been impressed with the improvements/advancements in the newer strains of Bermuda in the past 10 years.



    I'm in the process of moving to FL from NJ, staying for about 1 week in Greenville, SC before heading down to South FL. Played Furman U course today and the Bermuda greens (newer strain) were exceptional despite nearly 2 inches of rain overnight. I've also played on some surprisingly fast and smooth surfaces at a number of clubs in FL including Tequesta CC, Fox Club, and Medalist. All stimped faster than 12 with no real grain to worry about.



    I'm told Bermuda is generally less expensive than Bent, but I'm not an expert. Either way, agronomy has come a long way since I started playing in the early 90s and i would not be surprised to see places like Augusta National eventually switch over to these newer strains of Bermuda.



    Thoughts?




    While I still think a pure bentgrass green is the best putting surface, but the vast majority of the local tracks I play in metro ATL are migrating to these hybrid Bermuda greens. The change in some cases has been incredibly better. One such case is my home course. It's little dinky semi-private with a quirky layout thru a residential neighborhood. The new greens totally changed the course and made it a lot easier to overlook the layout. With bent greens we had maybe 4 month of ideal conditions and 3 months the heat and traffic made them less than desirable.
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