Is skiing too dangerous for serious elite junior golfers?

CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
We go every year, typically locally in the northeast a few times as well as a bigger trip to west coast once, but now that my son is in the prime “skill development” age I’m concerned about significant downtime if a major injury occurred. Seems inevitable given enough iterations.



Thoughts?
«13

Comments

  • scomac2002scomac2002 Inside the Starters' Hut Members Posts: 5,607 ✭✭
    Let him have an enjoyable life, don't turn him into a singularly focused protege. Keep skiing there's more to life than golf and that applies to all of us, even the professionals amongst our ranks.
    Your problem is LOFT -- Lack of friggin' talent!
    _____________________________________

    TM RBZ Black 12°
    Adams Tight Lies 2.0 16°/22°
    TM '09 Rescue 25°
    TM Burner Plus 6-AW
    Cleveland Smart Sole 2.0 C
    TM Z Spin 56°
    Rossa Tourismo 3 counterbalanced 37"
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
    scomac2002 wrote:


    Let him have an enjoyable life, don't turn him into a singularly focused protege. Keep skiing there's more to life than golf and that applies to all of us, even the professionals amongst our ranks.




    Maybe I should have asked a different question: are there activities your kids enjoy but you now avoid in order to prevent injury (for golf or life in general)?



    Seems like Rory regrets getting injured playing soccer and missing the 2015 Open Championship.



    The head rackets pro at our club specifically avoids skiing (despite competing in it as a youth) as he says it is very bad risk/reward for his livelihood.



    Cycling seems like another activity where, given enough iterations, there is almost certainty that one will get into a serious, potentially life-threatening, accident.
  • JBirdUtJBirdUt Members Posts: 363 ✭✭
    No guarantees in life. My daughter both skis and golfs, sometimes the same day. One of the joys of living in SLC.

    Keep your son on the runs within his ability, no hucking cliffs and stay out of the park.
  • NessismNessism To measure is to know... Members Posts: 18,500 ✭✭
    Let the kid enjoy life. Tiger ski's.
    Ping G400 driver w/Aldila Rogue 125 Silver 60S
    Cobra (Lexi blue) F7 5 wood w/Aldila Black 70S
    Cobra (Lexi blue) F7 Hybrid w/Aldila Kuro Kage 80S
    Ping G410 irons w/Recoil 95S (i200 backups)
    Ping Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110S
    Ping Anser/Arna putter - the "real deal!"
  • wildcatdenwildcatden China Cat Sunflower Members Posts: 897 ✭✭
    My kids skis. We got our season pass for 2017-18 already. Just awaiting the snow...
  • LegacyUserLegacyUser Guests Posts: 0
    Perhaps cross training in MMA as well...lol
  • Kenny Lee PuckettKenny Lee Puckett Members Posts: 3,460 ✭✭


    in avoiding possible skiing injuries wouldn't the advice be something just like from golf.... you want to keep it out of the trees?
    [font=tahoma,geneva,sans-serif]PING G LST: Ping Tour 80
    PING Anser 4wd: Accra S380 RT
    PXG 0317: Fujikura Rombax 8D07HB
    PING i500 4 iron: D.G. 120
    PING S55 5-PW: D.G. Tour Issue
    PING Glide 2.0 50/54/58: D.G. Tour Issue
    PING Darby F Ti Pixel: SS 2.0 Mid
    PING: Sensor Glove, Ping 703 Cord grips
    PING: Hoofer Bag
    TaylorMade: TP5 & TP5x ball

    WITB photos: [/font]
    http://www.golfwrx.c...uckett-witb-19/
  • BNGLBNGL Members Posts: 1,686 ✭✭
    From experience, if he's serious about golf and legit elite talent...just focus on golf. I tried surfing once in college with some friends of mine loved it, but scrapped up my knee awfully bad (trainers made me sit a week, bone bruise and swelling). For me it wasn't worth it, BUT there's plenty of PGA pros that ski religiously (no pun intended) The Cranes and Johnson's take an annual trip together along with who ever else wants to go. So choice is yours, but it wasn't right for me.
  • skisnutzskisnutz Members Posts: 226 ✭✭
    I worked for 8 years as a pro ski patroller, ski guide, and avalanche forecaster in Colorado. I can tell you from experience, having seen hundreds of injuries from altitude sickness to minor orthopedic injuries all the way to multi-systems traumatic fatalities ..... the kids get hurt far less often then the adults do. It's probably safest to let your kid ski while you watch from the lodge.
    Ping G400 Max 9.5* TPT Golf 16 MKP-MT-SW
    Ping G400 14.5* TPT Golf 15 LKP-MT-SW
    Ping G400 Hybrid 22* Kuro Kage Silver 80s
    Srixon U85 19* Graphite Design Tour AD-95x
    Srixon 585 5-P N.S. Pro Modus Tour 105s
    Cleveland RTX-4  50, 54, 58 N.S. Pro Modus Wedge 115
    Scotty Cameron California Del Mar Custom
    Srixon Z-Star XV 
  • heavy_hitterheavy_hitter Members Posts: 3,117 ✭✭
    You can walk out of the house, get in the car, and get in a car wreck. That doesn’t mean you never leave the house.
  • TPG1971TPG1971 Don't Get Rolled Members Posts: 962 ✭✭
    Keep him in a plastic bubble, that way he will be able to take care of you when he turns pro...
    PING G30 9.5 Fujikura Speeder Pro XLR8 63 Stiff
    Titleist 917F 16.5 Diamana Blue Stiff
    PING G410 19* Hybrid Mitsubishi CK Pro Blue 80 Stiff
    PING I200 4-PW Red Dot AWT 2.0 R Hard Stepped once
    PING Glide 2.0 Stealth Red Dot AWT Wedge Flex
    RTX-3 54 bent to 55 DG Ti Onyx S400
    Wilson Staff PMP 58* DG S200
    Cameron 009 A012056
  • Matt JMatt J Members Posts: 8,735 ✭✭
    I'd guess I've skied and biked about as many hours as anyone you'd ever meet and never suffered a serious injury. Motocross, boxing, and football are probably the only 3 sports I'd avoid more due to longevity than golf.



    Can't imagine skipping a ski trip because I was worried about playing golf. Talk about making a kid resent golf.
  • SocratesSocrates How can it be so *&#% hard to make a shoulder turn? WinnipegClubWRX Posts: 9,325 ClubWRX
    If the one poster is right (that he's 9) and you're worried about an injury hurting his chances at what? It's not like he's 1 month away from getting a full ride at Stanford. Go skiing and let him have some fun. Unless he pulls a Sonny Bono, all will be fine.
    Ping G400 9º TFC 419 Stiff at 45"
    Cobra F8 5-6 Fwy at 18.5° Stiff
    Ping i20 3 Hyb 707H Stiff
    X2 Hot 4_-PW Recoil 660 F3 +1/2"
    Ping Forged 52°, ES 56º and ES 60º
    Ping Sigma2 Valor at 34.5"
    MCC Align Midsize
    Moving to the bench:
    Jazz Bear Cat 3 wd Aerotech Stiff
    Vokey SM2 52º cc
    Scotty X7M Dual 38"
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
    edited Nov 12, 2017 #15
    Some interesting responses



    We have seen some major injuries (broken or dislocated limbs, sprained joints) that took kids out for an entire season or longer, and in some cases they could not catch up to their peers after falling behind



    That would be a tremendous loss if the goal is to maximize a child’s potential in a sport - and at a crucial age during the narrow window of skill development (9-12yo) no less.



    The likelihood of such an event happening is not extremely high, but if it were to occur the outcome so negative that I believe it might be worth considering vacationing elsewhere (maybe even somewhere warm playing golf!) instead of rolling the dice on the slopes - particularly in the northeast, where conditions are icier. So a better way of thinking about the decision would be how much more fun would a ski trip be vs some other type of vacation or activity, and is the incremental enjoyment worth the risk.



    The expected value of an event with a small probability but with very large consequence is not something to be ignored IMHO.
  • PigemsPigems Members Posts: 10,888 ✭✭
    Matt J wrote:


    I'd guess I've skied and biked about as many hours as anyone you'd ever meet and never suffered a serious injury. Motocross, boxing, and football are probably the only 3 sports I'd avoid more due to longevity than golf.



    Can't imagine skipping a ski trip because I was worried about playing golf. Talk about making a kid resent golf.




    And hockey lol, you can’t play hockey(properly) without getting injured in some way.
    910D2 9.5*- RIP Alpha 70x
    910f 17*- Diamana D+ 82x
    910h 20* Hybrid - S400
    712 CB 4i-Pw - S300
    SM5 51*, 55*- S300
    TVD 59* M - S300
    Studio Select NP2
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,808 ✭✭
    Plenty of the top players I teach didn’t touch a club until they were 12 or older. The “skills” you’re talking about learning 9-12 aren’t golf specific. They are simply being an athlete. You’re thinking about it only in golf terms, those “skills” are learned throwing a ball, running, playing tag, climbing fences, the stuff kids do being kids when not playing video games.



    i did things way more dangerous than skiing ( but also including skiing and snowboarding) my entire childhood and had several injuries, none of which held me back in golf.
  • NessismNessism To measure is to know... Members Posts: 18,500 ✭✭
    Guy where I work has two nephews that his brother has been grooming to be MLB players (pitchers) since they were playing little league. Both have received extensive training and coaching since that time and played on traveling club teams. Both were good and wound up getting scholarships but neither kid was interested in learning, just playing ball. Their father put all their eggs in one basket and promoted this way of thinking. Fast forward to today and both seem to be out of the game now. I had been following their progress out of curiousity but the trail of minor league info has stopped. The older boy had an offer that totaled a little over $1M for a minor league contract too, which he turned down because he thought it "too limiting". Dumb move there. That would have at least given him something to live on for a while.



    Moral of the story: let kids be kids. Nothing worse than an overbearing parent steering the "career" of a kid from a young age.
    Ping G400 driver w/Aldila Rogue 125 Silver 60S
    Cobra (Lexi blue) F7 5 wood w/Aldila Black 70S
    Cobra (Lexi blue) F7 Hybrid w/Aldila Kuro Kage 80S
    Ping G410 irons w/Recoil 95S (i200 backups)
    Ping Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110S
    Ping Anser/Arna putter - the "real deal!"
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
    leezer99 wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:


    Some interesting responses



    We have seen some major injuries (broken or dislocated limbs, sprained joints) that took kids out for an entire season or longer, and in some cases they could not catch up to their peers after falling behind



    That would be a tremendous loss if the goal is to maximize a child's potential in a sport - and at a crucial age during the narrow window of skill development (9-12yo) no less.



    The likelihood of such an event happening is not extremely high, but if it were to occur the outcome so negative that I believe it might be worth considering vacationing elsewhere (maybe even somewhere warm playing golf!) instead of rolling the dice on the slopes - particularly in the northeast, where conditions are icier. So a better way of thinking about the decision would be how much more fun would a ski trip be vs some other type of vacation or activity, and is the incremental enjoyment worth the risk.



    The expected value of an event with a small probability but with very large consequence is not something to be ignored IMHO.




    Make sure he doesn't wear socks in your house if you have hardwood floors. Could slip and fall, miss the masters and never achieve #1 in the OWGR.




    This is a perfect example of a straw man fallacy



    Internet trolls are experts at it
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:


    Plenty of the top players I teach didn’t touch a club until they were 12 or older. The “skills” you’re talking about learning 9-12 aren’t golf specific. They are simply being an athlete. You’re thinking about it only in golf terms, those “skills” are learned throwing a ball, running, playing tag, climbing fences, the stuff kids do being kids when not playing video games.



    i did things way more dangerous than skiing ( but also including skiing and snowboarding) my entire childhood and had several injuries, none of which held me back in golf.




    You are 100% correct



    The skills you mentioned above - how many can you do with a broken leg or torn knee?
  • PetethreeputPetethreeput Members Posts: 1,439 ✭✭
    edited Nov 12, 2017 #21
    No, no, no.



    If your kid loves to ski, I certainly would not hold him off for “What ifs.” Being a great golfer is athletics, all of them, and all of them carry inherent risks. The most likely inhibitor for your son won’t be his physical skills, but the mental side. Lots of guys are great golfers but only 150 have the mental side, and you can’t train or predict mental abilities.



    All the research has indicated children who play one sport as children are worse off in the end. So not only should he ski in the winter, he should be playing a fall sport and a spring sport that isn’t golf. Specialization shouldn’t happen for a number of years into his development.



    If it is meant to be, one year off bc of injury is not the end of the world, and it is unlikely. Kids are much “looser” than adults and much less unlikely to get injured anyway. I would be more worried about your knees than his.
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,808 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    Plenty of the top players I teach didn’t touch a club until they were 12 or older. The “skills” you’re talking about learning 9-12 aren’t golf specific. They are simply being an athlete. You’re thinking about it only in golf terms, those “skills” are learned throwing a ball, running, playing tag, climbing fences, the stuff kids do being kids when not playing video games.



    i did things way more dangerous than skiing ( but also including skiing and snowboarding) my entire childhood and had several injuries, none of which held me back in golf.




    You are 100% correct



    The skills you mentioned above - how many can you do with a broken leg or torn knee?




    You can throw a ball with a broken leg or torn knee. I dislocated my knee cap at 11 and shattered my collarbone in two places at 12. Still chipped and putted through both and hit wedge shots with knee injury. Golf is primarily hand eye coordination and speed related which you can work on sitting in a chair. I played 5 events in college with a broken ankle in a walking boot. Peter Tomasulo played in the Web.com Tour championship with a broken leg in a cast.



    Again kids have injuries all the time and many don’t pick up a club until older than your son is now yet become top golfers. An injury at 9 years old isn’t going to prevent your kid from being a great golfer if he wants to be one and works at it the right way. If he is going to be great he will be great.
  • johnsompjohnsomp Members Posts: 178 ✭✭
    Let them ski! You can get injured running around in the back yard!
  • Matt JMatt J Members Posts: 8,735 ✭✭
    edited Nov 12, 2017 #24
    CTgolf wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    Plenty of the top players I teach didn’t touch a club until they were 12 or older. The “skills” you’re talking about learning 9-12 aren’t golf specific. They are simply being an athlete. You’re thinking about it only in golf terms, those “skills” are learned throwing a ball, running, playing tag, climbing fences, the stuff kids do being kids when not playing video games.



    i did things way more dangerous than skiing ( but also including skiing and snowboarding) my entire childhood and had several injuries, none of which held me back in golf.




    You are 100% correct



    The skills you mentioned above - how many can you do with a broken leg or torn knee?




    Sure, that's a straw man. But, you sound like a classic case of the tail wagging the dog. You're the head of the household, choose a vacation based on your whole family's enjoyment, not a 9 y/o's hobby and recreation. What you don't understand is that this kind of mentality is exactly what will hold him back. Not only does he have the pressure of competition, but also having detoured family vacations, which I'm sure is just the tip of the iceberg. Let him be a kid, that happens to enjoy golf right now. Not that you're going to listen to a guy on the internet, but maybe you'll get the point. Don't help him obsess over golf. Help him have balance in life.



    Oops. Wrong quote. Should be the straw man quote.



    iTeach- when I was a kid in the 80's, our best kid golfers largely didn't pan out as very few of them matured into having club head speed. Is that still true?
  • Petunia SprinklePetunia Sprinkle Future King of France Unregistered Posts: 5,362 ✭✭
    Let them ski. Don’t let them drive.
  • wkndhackwkndhack Members Posts: 908 ✭✭
    The balance and lower body work he gets from skiing might help his golf.
    Cobra King F7+ Evenflow Black 65 6.0
    Cobra King F7 3W Oban Isawa Red 75-04
    Cobra King F6 Baffler Aldila Tour Blue 85S
    Cobra King Utility ONE 21.5 C Taper Lite 110S
    Cobra King Forged Tec Black ONE 5-GW C Taper Lite 110S
    Cobra King Pur 54V, 58V DG S200
    Bettinardi QB8
    Srixon Q-Star Tour
  • iteachgolfiteachgolf Members Posts: 16,808 ✭✭
    Matt J wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    Plenty of the top players I teach didn’t touch a club until they were 12 or older. The “skills” you’re talking about learning 9-12 aren’t golf specific. They are simply being an athlete. You’re thinking about it only in golf terms, those “skills” are learned throwing a ball, running, playing tag, climbing fences, the stuff kids do being kids when not playing video games.



    i did things way more dangerous than skiing ( but also including skiing and snowboarding) my entire childhood and had several injuries, none of which held me back in golf.




    You are 100% correct



    The skills you mentioned above - how many can you do with a broken leg or torn knee?




    Sure, that's a straw man. But, you sound like a classic case of the tail wagging the dog. You're the head of the household, choose a vacation based on your whole family's enjoyment, not a 9 y/o's hobby and recreation. What you don't understand is that this kind of mentality is exactly what will hold him back. Not only does he have the pressure of competition, but also having detoured family vacations, which I'm sure is just the tip of the iceberg. Let him be a kid, that happens to enjoy golf right now. Not that you're going to listen to a guy on the internet, but maybe you'll get the point. Don't help him obsess over golf. Help him have balance in life.



    Oops. Wrong quote. Should be the straw man quote.



    iTeach- when I was a kid in the 80's, our best kid golfers largely didn't pan out as very few of them matured into having club head speed. Is that still true?




    I’d say how good a kid is at 8-12 is really meaningless due to how different kids mature and grow. A lot of kids get burnt out and don’t love it when they get older. The juniors I teach who are the best ( have taught 4 NCAA national champions) were well rounded and while they have a passion for golf, they have lives outside of golf too.
  • darter79darter79 Members Posts: 701 ✭✭
    CTgolf wrote:
    We go every year, typically locally in the northeast a few times as well as a bigger trip to west coast once, but now that my son is in the prime “skill development” age I’m concerned about significant downtime if a major injury occurred. Seems inevitable given enough iterations.



    Thoughts?




    Without sounding like a troll are you serious? Enjoy life. He not getting paid. If he gets hurt that’s life s*** happens, but to take an experience away because your afraid of doing harm to said golf career is absurd. If your that afraid of it try the beach.



    You only live once
  • nitramnitram Take Dead Aim Members Posts: 5,177 ✭✭
    When you over-protect, you subdue his "competitive side". Let him be a boy and and experience some great family memories because you don't have him for much longer, believe it or not. Unless you want him in your basement 'til he's 30, give him a chance to experience thrills, competition, and perseverance. Be patient and supportive, but let him decide what he wants to do. It's tough, I know.
    JBeam BM-435 Blackout 9* Accra Tour-Z RPG 352
    TEE CBX 15* Accra Tour-Z RPG 382
    Bridgestone J33 Airmuscle 19* Veylix Rome 988X
    PING S55 4-W DGTI X100
    PING Glide 2.0 Stealth 50SS, 56SS, & 60ES DGTI S400
    Bettinardi Tour DASS Minovai 2.0
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
    iteachgolf wrote:

    Matt J wrote:

    CTgolf wrote:

    iteachgolf wrote:


    Plenty of the top players I teach didn't touch a club until they were 12 or older. The "skills" you're talking about learning 9-12 aren't golf specific. They are simply being an athlete. You're thinking about it only in golf terms, those "skills" are learned throwing a ball, running, playing tag, climbing fences, the stuff kids do being kids when not playing video games.



    i did things way more dangerous than skiing ( but also including skiing and snowboarding) my entire childhood and had several injuries, none of which held me back in golf.




    You are 100% correct



    The skills you mentioned above - how many can you do with a broken leg or torn knee?




    Sure, that's a straw man. But, you sound like a classic case of the tail wagging the dog. You're the head of the household, choose a vacation based on your whole family's enjoyment, not a 9 y/o's hobby and recreation. What you don't understand is that this kind of mentality is exactly what will hold him back. Not only does he have the pressure of competition, but also having detoured family vacations, which I'm sure is just the tip of the iceberg. Let him be a kid, that happens to enjoy golf right now. Not that you're going to listen to a guy on the internet, but maybe you'll get the point. Don't help him obsess over golf. Help him have balance in life.



    Oops. Wrong quote. Should be the straw man quote.



    iTeach- when I was a kid in the 80's, our best kid golfers largely didn't pan out as very few of them matured into having club head speed. Is that still true?




    I'd say how good a kid is at 8-12 is really meaningless due to how different kids mature and grow. A lot of kids get burnt out and don't love it when they get older. The juniors I teach who are the best ( have taught 4 NCAA national champions) were well rounded and while they have a passion for golf, they have lives outside of golf too.




    iteachgolf - you make some very good points, but your comment "how good a kid is at 8-12 is really meaningless" is a false narrative IMHO



    only 1.8% of high school golfers go on to compete at the NCAA D1 level

    http://www.scholarshipstats.com/golf.htm



    I think if you actually looked very closely at the stats and history, the top golfers at a young age (8yo, 12yo, whatever - pick an age) actually have a significantly higher % chance of playing at the D1 (or higher) level than 1 in 50; you could simply cross-reference the Pinehurst World Championship historical results (top 100) with list of college/pro golfers as a back of the envelope sanity check



    as has been discussed in other threads/topics, showing promise at an early age doesn't *guarantee* success later, but it is a better predictor of it than anything else



    btw I also agree with Matt J that having requisite club head speed is a limiting factor for junior golfers who make it to the next level
  • CTgolfCTgolf Members Posts: 440 ✭✭
    I am thankful for all of the advice and responses (even the sarcastic ones) as they provide perspective and made me take a step back and think about the issue from a broader perspective - I think we will probably keep skiing despite the risks, but perhaps be more vigilant from a safety perspective
Sign In or Register to comment.