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The real reason golfers don’t get better with practice

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  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers  16989WRX Points: 1,079Handicap: 4-5Posts: 16,989 Titanium Tees
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    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    IMO golf is not nearly as hard as some folks make what's a relatively simple movement hard.<br />
    <br />
    Year ago, my college golf coach years ago did a demonstration. He had a giant chalkboard with a drawing of stairs. He outlined every body movement to "think about" while walking down a flight of stairs....in extreme detail...weight here....knee moves here...then weight moves there...arm swings there, etc. Then he had the group dissect each movement from there. At the end, he took each person to a flight of stairs, one at a time, and asked them to walk down the stairs without holding the railing. Not ONE person could freely walk down the stairs after about 2 steps without grabbing the railing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    When I read the above, it brought to mind "overthinking" or letting minutia get in one's way of progress. Some people get off on making mechanic minutia more important than improving their golf thinking and scoring ability.<br />
    <br />
    Not to pick on any one person but seen it over and over; engineers, math or like minds tend to get in their own way by letting minutia stagnate improvement. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />
    Posted:
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  • jmkenn0jmkenn0 Members  822WRX Points: 157Posts: 822 Golden Tee
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    Nard_S wrote:
    <br />
    The process the article lays out is highly similar to what is used in TQM manufacturing methods. It's the reason planes don't fall out of the sky and Toyota's go 300K without a hiccup even though there's 10's of thousands of components in both. The learning/improvement process is ongoing and does not end at the lesson or process plan. It's continual, it has a matrix to evaluate and adjust in real time and do better on the next effort. There's good stuff here and frankly I need to adopt it more even though I've gotten companies ISO registered, lol.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I was thinking the same thing. Cut out the "new-age mumbo jumbo" (its really not that new) and call in PDCA - Plan Do Check Act.
      <br />
    • Have a plan (setup/swing thought/target/etc)<br />
    • Hit the ball<br />
    • Check your results - where did the ball go in relation to your plan? What other feedback (divot/video/feels) can you incorporate?<br />
    • Update your plan accordingly<br />
    <br />
    Repeat.<br />
    <br />
    Do I do all of this? No. But I also have the "meta-awareness" to realize that I'm ok with my golf game being where it is, and practice would require me to sacrifice elsewhere.
    Posted:
  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
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    jmkenn0 wrote:
    <br />
    Nard_S wrote:
    <br />
    The process the article lays out is highly similar to what is used in TQM manufacturing methods. It's the reason planes don't fall out of the sky and Toyota's go 300K without a hiccup even though there's 10's of thousands of components in both. The learning/improvement process is ongoing and does not end at the lesson or process plan. It's continual, it has a matrix to evaluate and adjust in real time and do better on the next effort. There's good stuff here and frankly I need to adopt it more even though I've gotten companies ISO registered, lol.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I was thinking the same thing. Cut out the "new-age mumbo jumbo" (its really not that new) and call in PDCA - Plan Do Check Act.
      <br />
    • Have a plan (setup/swing thought/target/etc)<br />
    • Hit the ball<br />
    • Check your results - where did the ball go in relation to your plan? What other feedback (divot/video/feels) can you incorporate?<br />
    • Update your plan accordingly<br />
    <br />
    Repeat.<br />
    <br />
    Do I do all of this? No. But I also have the "meta-awareness" to realize that I'm ok with my golf game being where it is, and practice would require me to sacrifice elsewhere.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    That sounds like the system for which all the golfers who don't improve utilize.
    Posted:
  • naval2006naval2006 ArgentinaMembers  1026WRX Points: 131Handicap: 7Posts: 1,026 Platinum Tees
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    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    IMO golf is not nearly as hard as some folks make what's a relatively simple movement hard.<br />
    <br />
    Year ago, my college golf coach years ago did a demonstration. He had a giant chalkboard with a drawing of stairs. He outlined every body movement to "think about" while walking down a flight of stairs....in extreme detail...weight here....knee moves here...then weight moves there...arm swings there, etc. Then he had the group dissect each movement from there. At the end, he took each person to a flight of stairs, one at a time, and asked them to walk down the stairs without holding the railing. Not ONE person could freely walk down the stairs after about 2 steps without grabbing the railing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    When I read the above, it brought to mind "overthinking" or letting minutia get in one's way of progress. Some people get off on making mechanic minutia more important than improving their golf thinking and scoring ability.<br />
    <br />
    Not to pick on any one person but seen it over and over; engineers, math or like minds tend to get in their own way by letting minutia stagnate improvement. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Yeah, usually very hard for overanalytical people to learn golf. There’s a tendency to forget golf is a sport and lots of people put no athleticism at all in the game, they treat it as hard science.
    Posted:
  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
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    naval2006 wrote:
    <br />
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    IMO golf is not nearly as hard as some folks make what's a relatively simple movement hard.<br />
    <br />
    Year ago, my college golf coach years ago did a demonstration. He had a giant chalkboard with a drawing of stairs. He outlined every body movement to "think about" while walking down a flight of stairs....in extreme detail...weight here....knee moves here...then weight moves there...arm swings there, etc. Then he had the group dissect each movement from there. At the end, he took each person to a flight of stairs, one at a time, and asked them to walk down the stairs without holding the railing. Not ONE person could freely walk down the stairs after about 2 steps without grabbing the railing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    When I read the above, it brought to mind "overthinking" or letting minutia get in one's way of progress. Some people get off on making mechanic minutia more important than improving their golf thinking and scoring ability.<br />
    <br />
    Not to pick on any one person but seen it over and over; engineers, math or like minds tend to get in their own way by letting minutia stagnate improvement. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Yeah, usually very hard for overanalytical people to learn golf. There’s a tendency to forget golf is a sport and lots of people put no athleticism at all in the game, they treat it as hard science.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I'd really like those guys to answer the following: What would they think while walking across an 18 inch wide board on the ground? Then what would they think when walking across the same board 30 stories high between two buildings?
    Posted:
  • wmblake2000wmblake2000 Los AngelesMembers  6027WRX Points: 768Posts: 6,027 Titanium Tees
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    naval2006 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    IMO golf is not nearly as hard as some folks make what's a relatively simple movement hard.<br />
    <br />
    Year ago, my college golf coach years ago did a demonstration. He had a giant chalkboard with a drawing of stairs. He outlined every body movement to "think about" while walking down a flight of stairs....in extreme detail...weight here....knee moves here...then weight moves there...arm swings there, etc. Then he had the group dissect each movement from there. At the end, he took each person to a flight of stairs, one at a time, and asked them to walk down the stairs without holding the railing. Not ONE person could freely walk down the stairs after about 2 steps without grabbing the railing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    When I read the above, it brought to mind "overthinking" or letting minutia get in one's way of progress. Some people get off on making mechanic minutia more important than improving their golf thinking and scoring ability.<br />
    <br />
    Not to pick on any one person but seen it over and over; engineers, math or like minds tend to get in their own way by letting minutia stagnate improvement. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Yeah, usually very hard for overanalytical people to learn golf. There’s a tendency to forget golf is a sport and lots of people put no athleticism at all in the game, they treat it as hard science.
    <br />
    <br />
    I agree - but then there are people like Phil and Deshambeau ...
    Posted:
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  • Krt22Krt22 East BayMembers  9512WRX Points: 3,140Posts: 9,512 Titanium Tees
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    There is also the subset of golfers that dont just neglect athleticism, but out right think that athleticism won't help them at all and in some cases even hurt their game. Being healthier and more fit will only help your game
    Posted:
  • PepperturboPepperturbo Midwest and SouthwestMembers  16989WRX Points: 1,079Handicap: 4-5Posts: 16,989 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Nov 20, 2018 #219
    <br />
    naval2006 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    IMO golf is not nearly as hard as some folks make what's a relatively simple movement hard.<br />
    <br />
    Year ago, my college golf coach years ago did a demonstration. He had a giant chalkboard with a drawing of stairs. He outlined every body movement to "think about" while walking down a flight of stairs....in extreme detail...weight here....knee moves here...then weight moves there...arm swings there, etc. Then he had the group dissect each movement from there. At the end, he took each person to a flight of stairs, one at a time, and asked them to walk down the stairs without holding the railing. Not ONE person could freely walk down the stairs after about 2 steps without grabbing the railing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    When I read the above, it brought to mind "overthinking" or letting minutia get in one's way of progress. Some people get off on making mechanic minutia more important than improving their golf thinking and scoring ability.<br />
    <br />
    Not to pick on any one person but seen it over and over; engineers, math or like minds tend to get in their own way by letting minutia stagnate improvement. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Yeah, usually very hard for overanalytical people to learn golf. There’s a tendency to forget golf is a sport and lots of people put no athleticism at all in the game, they treat it as hard science.
    <br />
    <br />
    I agree - but then there are people like Phil and Deshambeau ...<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    True, both your examples are known to be analytical. But I see their behavior as nothing more than attention to good golfer details; as opposed to engineers and math minds or the like that are overly analytical about every aspect or thing. The latter group sees the slightest detail as having a paramount influence on the swing and outcome bogs them down when over the ball. Instead of a 3 or 4 step wedge swing, they tend to see the impact of every digit on the clock. <br />
    <br />
    A friend (10 index) has a BS Mathematics and MS in Engineering and leads a design team. We've talked, and I have watched him over the ball. It's evident how all the minutia makes it challenging for him to clear his mind allowing him to feel confident over the ball and execute the shot.<br />
    <br />
    IMO - Once the body has grooved swing and muscle memory "attention to detail" deals with making a quick clear shot plan, executing the proper takeaway, swing and face angle for the intended shot. Then noticing how the ball was impacted through shaft vibration in the hands and recalling how one's body acted when making the swing to decide if the shot was executed correctly or not.<br />
    Of course, there are other minor details like how the ball behaves on different turf, under different conditions and reading greens but not much about swing mechanics as it's entwined in muscle memory. Only to be tweaked now and again. My 2cents. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' />
    Posted:
    Titleist TS2 9.5, Ventus 5 "S"
    Titleist TS2 16.5*, Ventus 7 "S"
    Titleist 718 T-MB 17* 2i, Steelfiber 95 "S"
    Titleist 620 CB 3i-6i, Steelfiber i110 "S"
    Titleist 620 MB 7-PW - Steelfiber i125 "S"
    SM6 F-52/8, Steelfiber i125 "S"
    SM6 M-58/8, DG-S200
    SC California Monterey
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  • dj*dj* Members  71WRX Points: 2Posts: 71 Bunkers
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    Unlimited reasons, not limited to, uncoordinated, unwilling to put in the work, unimaginative, undisciplined, unaware and unable to differentiate cause from effect- unable to separate wheat from the chaff.
    Posted:
  • Nard_SNard_S Members  3952WRX Points: 903Handicap: 9Posts: 3,952 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #221
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/12/how-to-learn-new-skills-twice-as-fast/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.16d827c8c5df<br />
    <br />
    Found this interesting and validates personal experience.<br />
    <br />
    Upshot is to speed up improvements, alter the practice, alter the clubs.........alter.<br />
    <br />
    I've made biggest gains of true improvement when I changed weight or flex of shafts or head type or SW or just alter type of shot. For instance practice low punch draws if stock shot is high fade. Swing gets stale,plods and even degrades when I do same thing all the time. Science backs this experience and probably explains the payoff to ho'ing clubs and why best practices have me doing a variety of things with a variety of goals and clubs.
    Posted:
  • wmblake2000wmblake2000 Los AngelesMembers  6027WRX Points: 768Posts: 6,027 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #222
    <br />
    <br />
    naval2006 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    IMO golf is not nearly as hard as some folks make what's a relatively simple movement hard.<br />
    <br />
    Year ago, my college golf coach years ago did a demonstration. He had a giant chalkboard with a drawing of stairs. He outlined every body movement to "think about" while walking down a flight of stairs....in extreme detail...weight here....knee moves here...then weight moves there...arm swings there, etc. Then he had the group dissect each movement from there. At the end, he took each person to a flight of stairs, one at a time, and asked them to walk down the stairs without holding the railing. Not ONE person could freely walk down the stairs after about 2 steps without grabbing the railing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    When I read the above, it brought to mind "overthinking" or letting minutia get in one's way of progress. Some people get off on making mechanic minutia more important than improving their golf thinking and scoring ability.<br />
    <br />
    Not to pick on any one person but seen it over and over; engineers, math or like minds tend to get in their own way by letting minutia stagnate improvement. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Yeah, usually very hard for overanalytical people to learn golf. There’s a tendency to forget golf is a sport and lots of people put no athleticism at all in the game, they treat it as hard science.
    <br />
    <br />
    I agree - but then there are people like Phil and Deshambeau ...<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    True, both your examples are known to be analytical. But I see their behavior as nothing more than attention to good golfer details; as opposed to engineers and math minds or the like that are overly analytical about every aspect or thing. The latter group sees the slightest detail as having a paramount influence on the swing and outcome bogs them down when over the ball. Instead of a 3 or 4 step wedge swing, they tend to see the impact of every digit on the clock. <br />
    <br />
    A friend (10 index) has a BS Mathematics and MS in Engineering and leads a design team. We've talked, and I have watched him over the ball. It's evident how all the minutia makes it challenging for him to clear his mind allowing him to feel confident over the ball and execute the shot.<br />
    <br />
    IMO - Once the body has grooved swing and muscle memory "attention to detail" deals with making a quick clear shot plan, executing the proper takeaway, swing and face angle for the intended shot. Then noticing how the ball was impacted through shaft vibration in the hands and recalling how one's body acted when making the swing to decide if the shot was executed correctly or not.<br />
    Of course, there are other minor details like how the ball behaves on different turf, under different conditions and reading greens but not much about swing mechanics as it's entwined in muscle memory. Only to be tweaked now and again. My 2cents. <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/beach.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':beach:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I think what we're calling 'overanalytical' is really shorthand for people who are not real connected to their bodies/feel, those guys that live above their eyebrows, so to speak. I am guessing if you talked to Michael Jordan or Tiger Woods, they'd have a whole lot of detailed understanding of each moment in the swing but this is based first on feel that they then translated into ideas (vs from ideas to feel, although I am sure they have done some of that, too).
    Posted:
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  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Nov 20, 2018 #223
    As I posted above, my college golf coach did the stairs experiment. This is a great example of "over-thinking" to the point of paralysis. You see it all the time on the course....guy stands up to the ball...you can almost hear the list of instructions given to every body-part....you're waiting....then they hit and lose their balance.
    Posted:
  • sailfishchrissailfishchris Long Island NYMembers, ClubWRX  1116WRX Points: 300Handicap: 4Posts: 1,116 Platinum Tees
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    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    As I posted above, my college golf coach did the stairs experiment. This is a great example of "over-thinking" to the point of paralysis. You see it all the time on the course....guy stands up to the ball...you can almost hear the list of instructions given to every body-part....you're waiting....then they hit and lose their balance.<br />
    A "forest for the trees" mentality.
    Posted:
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  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
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    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    As I posted above, my college golf coach did the stairs experiment. This is a great example of "over-thinking" to the point of paralysis. You see it all the time on the course....guy stands up to the ball...you can almost hear the list of instructions given to every body-part....you're waiting....then they hit and lose their balance.<br />
    A "forest for the trees" mentality.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    You could say that...or....there reaches a point where there's no use to try to dish-out instructions to the body because it knows what to do...or...the brain is simply over-riding what one can do in increments without hitting. I've posted before that I can get guys to nearly mimic every position of their favorite golfer....in SLOW MOTION...but as soon as they speed up....POOF....looks nothing like what they just mimicked for the prior hour.
    Posted:
  • gatorpedsMDgatorpedsMD Hacker-in-Chief ClubWRX  4564WRX Points: 799Handicap: 1.5Posts: 4,564 ClubWRX
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    Posted:
  • ebrasmus21ebrasmus21 Serial Shanker CAMembers  6225WRX Points: 1,994Handicap: 2.7Posts: 6,225 Titanium Tees
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    gatorMD wrote:
    <br />
    <br />
    Yet another interesting read. Thank you for sharing.
    Posted:
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  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Nov 21, 2018 #228
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    Posted:
  • ebrasmus21ebrasmus21 Serial Shanker CAMembers  6225WRX Points: 1,994Handicap: 2.7Posts: 6,225 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #229
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    <br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Please, for the love of God, tell me its Sharna?!?!
    Posted:
    G400 LST - TPT proto
    TM M3 - Rogue Silver 110MSI 70S
    21* Fourteen Type 7 Driving Iron - HZRDUS Black 6.5 105g
    4 - PW Mizuno MP 18 MMC - SteelFiber FC115
    50, 54, 60 RC Dual Bite - SteelFiber i125
    Evnroll ER5
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  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
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    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    <br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Please, for the love of God, tell me its Sharna?!?!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    It's not Sharna....but I hear you bro....but just as eye-popping. I can tell you these gals are IN SHAPE!
    Posted:
  • ebrasmus21ebrasmus21 Serial Shanker CAMembers  6225WRX Points: 1,994Handicap: 2.7Posts: 6,225 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  edited Nov 21, 2018 #231
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    <br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Please, for the love of God, tell me its Sharna?!?!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    It's not Sharna....but I hear you bro....but just as eye-popping. I can tell you these gals are IN SHAPE!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    That's a statement I think all of WRX can agree upon <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/friends.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':friends:' />
    Posted:
    G400 LST - TPT proto
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  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  edited Nov 21, 2018 #232
    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    <br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Please, for the love of God, tell me its Sharna?!?!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    It's not Sharna....but I hear you bro....but just as eye-popping. I can tell you these gals are IN SHAPE!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    That's a statement I think all of WRX can agree upon <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/friends.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':friends:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I went to several shoots and OMG....few folks in sports can hold a candle to the conditioning of DWTS dancers. Some of the stuff they do is mind-boggling in person that TV doesn't give credit.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • wmblake2000wmblake2000 Los AngelesMembers  6027WRX Points: 768Posts: 6,027 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #233
    FourTops wrote:
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    <br />
    <br />
    This makes total sense to me. I have been thinking that the core constraint in improving is not all the stuff I have been fretting over but is, in fact, the physical constraints that my not very flexible body presents me.
    Posted:
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  • wmblake2000wmblake2000 Los AngelesMembers  6027WRX Points: 768Posts: 6,027 Titanium Tees
    Joined:  #234
    gatorMD wrote:
    <br />
    <br />
    This too makes great sense. I started marshaling at a little exec course just to be able to practice on it and play more than one ball. <br />
    <br />
    The one thing I haven’t started doing is playing practice games on the range - the addiction to scraping balls is strong (and I enjoy that but it has limits to usefulness). But it makes sense.
    Posted:
    Ping GMax 400 10.5 TPT 17 LKP
    Callawy Epic 5W 
    Callaway X-hot pro 3,4 h
    TM P790 5-W, DG 105 R
    Mizuno MP4 4-W, c-taper lite, 105 R
    Macgregor 1025M 4-W, KBS tour v, 110 S
    Vokey SM7 48, 52, 56
    Fourteen mt28v3 50, 54, 58
    Cameron Futura 5W



  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #235
    I want to add to my prior "DWTS" post. I just sat down at the piano after not playing since Sunday and my fingers feel like lead weights. I think there is more to this story than I originally thought....stretch to not only perform at a top level...but to allow a level of stress and still remain plenty flexible.
    Posted:
  • hbgpagolfprohbgpagolfpro Members  1254WRX Points: 0Posts: 1,254
    Joined:  #236
    Just thought I'd chime in with my two cents. I think the real reason most golfers don't improve is that they don't have a good process where they build a foundation and move on from there.<br />
    <br />
    I equate golf to the martial arts quite a bit, since I've been a student of both. Martial arts instruction tends to be much different. Rarely one on one, so everyone is taught the same. You start with very basic stances, punches, kicks and blocks before you move on to forms and more complicated stuff.<br />
    <br />
    In the martial arts, you also have the opportunity to attend many classes during the week, and then you train with other students at your level and above.<br />
    <br />
    Typical golf instruction involves about 5 beginner group lessons, and then you are off and running. If you have some ability, you can get to a certain level, and then maybe you will seek out private golf instruction, which tends to be about the same cost for one hour as you'll pay to attend martial arts classes for a whole month. <br />
    <br />
    So, if you want to improve over the long run, you need a better process for learning. It's not so much about setting goals and such. You just have to work on the right things at whatever level you happen to be. <br />
    <br />
    I think one of the big issues in the world of golf instruction is student expectation. When I first got into teaching, a couple top instructors gave me the same advice...to keep a student coming back, you need to get them to experience some sort of improvement during each lesson.<br />
    <br />
    In other words, the focus was always on the short-term, kinda like when a company reports its earnings each quarter. If they miss estimates, investors dump the stock. <br />
    <br />
    I'll never forget one of the first lessons I ever gave. A student came to me for a lesson, and he had a horrible swing...way too many moving parts. So, I just worked on trying to simplify things a bit.<br />
    <br />
    After about 30 minutes he says "don't you have some sort of quick fix? I have a tournament on Saturday." I said "Nope, not for that swing."<br />
    <br />
    And, there it is.
    Posted:
    Blogging about all things golf on my blog at Scott Cole Golf. Will be getting back to teaching part time in 2019!
  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #237
    <br />
    Just thought I'd chime in with my two cents. I think the real reason most golfers don't improve is that they don't have a good process where they build a foundation and move on from there.<br />
    <br />
    I equate golf to the martial arts quite a bit, since I've been a student of both. Martial arts instruction tends to be much different. Rarely one on one, so everyone is taught the same. You start with very basic stances, punches, kicks and blocks before you move on to forms and more complicated stuff.<br />
    <br />
    In the martial arts, you also have the opportunity to attend many classes during the week, and then you train with other students at your level and above.<br />
    <br />
    Typical golf instruction involves about 5 beginner group lessons, and then you are off and running. If you have some ability, you can get to a certain level, and then maybe you will seek out private golf instruction, which tends to be about the same cost for one hour as you'll pay to attend martial arts classes for a whole month. <br />
    <br />
    So, if you want to improve over the long run, you need a better process for learning. It's not so much about setting goals and such. You just have to work on the right things at whatever level you happen to be. <br />
    <br />
    I think one of the big issues in the world of golf instruction is student expectation. When I first got into teaching, a couple top instructors gave me the same advice...to keep a student coming back, you need to get them to experience some sort of improvement during each lesson.<br />
    <br />
    In other words, the focus was always on the short-term, kinda like when a company reports its earnings each quarter. If they miss estimates, investors dump the stock. <br />
    <br />
    I'll never forget one of the first lessons I ever gave. A student came to me for a lesson, and he had a horrible swing...way too many moving parts. So, I just worked on trying to simplify things a bit.<br />
    <br />
    After about 30 minutes he says "don't you have some sort of quick fix? I have a tournament on Saturday." I said "Nope, not for that swing."<br />
    <br />
    And, there it is.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Great post man!!!! I tend to compare golf and piano...but Martial Arts comparison is REALLY GOOD! Stay in the "now"....don't get ahead. WELL DONE!
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • GolfjackGolfjack All about the rotation Members  1619WRX Points: 502Posts: 1,619 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #238
    Yeah I wish I had the luxury of on course practice. Closest I get is simulator, but it's not really that good since it's not a real environment but it makes it easier to set skill games and multi ball.
    Posted:
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  • FourTopsFourTops Banned  1676WRX Points: 16Handicap: 5.7Posts: 1,676 Platinum Tees
    Joined:  #239
    Golfjack wrote:
    <br />
    Yeah I wish I had the luxury of on course practice. Closest I get is simulator, but it's not really that good since it's not a real environment but it makes it easier to set skill games and multi ball.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Where do you live? Gaza Strip?
    Posted:
  • gatorpedsMDgatorpedsMD Hacker-in-Chief ClubWRX  4564WRX Points: 799Handicap: 1.5Posts: 4,564 ClubWRX
    Joined:  #240
    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    gatorMD wrote:
    <br />
    <br />
    Yet another interesting read. Thank you for sharing.<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    i saw a thing on youtube where Alex Noren plays two ball worse ball and I think that is the closet to "optimal practice" I have come up with..... U also have to make both puts at the end. like say u have a five footer. if u miss one then it doesn't count as made.
    Posted:
  • GolfWRXGolfWRX Warning Points: 0  11 Members Posts: 11 #ad
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  • gatorpedsMDgatorpedsMD Hacker-in-Chief ClubWRX  4564WRX Points: 799Handicap: 1.5Posts: 4,564 ClubWRX
    Joined:  #241
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    ebrasmus21 wrote:
    <br />
    FourTops wrote:
    <br />
    Posted A minute ago<br />
    I talked to our personal friend who is a professional dancer about 30 minutes ago because I texted her asking why i seem to not be able to perform certain moves in golf at full-speed...only in slow motion. i told her my body seems to be rejecting my requests. <br />
    <br />
    She called me and said: "you're NOT stretched enough!" She said she stretches for over an hour before attempting a dance routine...and has a specific regimen of stretches according to the upcoming dance style / demands. She said she's stretching when she's off camera between dances. She also said "imagine me...I do this for a living...and I have to stretch more in one night than you in 10 years!". She was joking...but making a point. She said it's not your brain fighting you....it's your body saying NO. She added that's why I can hit certain positions in slow-motion...but not at full-speed.<br />
    <br />
    I can't say who this woman is....but if you've watched DWTS....you've seen her many times.
    <br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Please, for the love of God, tell me its Sharna?!?!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    i def spend 10 minutes now warming up including some orange whip work!<br />
    <br />
    It's not Sharna....but I hear you bro....but just as eye-popping. I can tell you these gals are IN SHAPE!<br />
    <br />
    <br />
    That's a statement I think all of WRX can agree upon <img src='http://www.golfwrx.com/forums/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/friends.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':friends:' /><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    I went to several shoots and OMG....few folks in sports can hold a candle to the conditioning of DWTS dancers. Some of the stuff they do is mind-boggling in person that TV doesn't give credit.<br />
    Posted:
11

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