Rocco and Alcohol

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  • rawdograwdog Cleveland, OHMembers Posts: 3,015 ✭✭
    LeoLeo99 wrote:




    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I'm forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot��




    Pretty myopic view of the world, don't you think? Something didn't happen to you, so it doesn't exist?




    Oh **** no. Never said it doesn't exist, just never existed for me and I hate sweeping generalizations or excuses with others. In fact I have more than a few friends that are either recovering or currently are dancing w the devil.



    Just don't agree with the earlier statement that alluded to the thought that people on the road and living out of hotel rooms gives them an excuse to start drinking and becoming alcoholics.



    Alcoholism runs much deeper than lonely nights spent in a hotel room.




    I know I drink more when I travel for business. I'm lonely. I'm bored. When I travel with people, they all drink a lot. We drink every night. I don't drink every night at home.



    It's no excuse but I can understand how someone at risk could get in trouble.




    Yes, that is my issue. I am a very go-go-go type of person. When I'm all "caught up" I get bored. And sitting on the couch watching TV can easily turn into "go watch the game alone at a bar" very quickly. Which can turn into waking up late for work very quickly.



    And then the next day you wake up depressed about the bad decision you made. And you're not productive. Then you can't sleep because your body clock is off.



    Been there, done that. It sucks, but if you address the underlying reason for drinking (ie, boredom), you can avoid it or find healthy behaviors.
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  • playar32playar32 Members Posts: 274 ✭✭


    Too many to even list. I decided in college if I wanted to pursue golf professionally I was gonna have to get sober. So I did. Not only does it allow you to get the most out of your mornings but you're really a much better off person . My bout with depression became drastically better once I got sober but that's a battle that's always being fought. The thing I noticed is how many friends you lose the minute you stop drinking. As if they don't even want you around anymore , while you're perfectly fine saying hi for a few hours and having water /soda with them. Pooof , don't even get me started with dating. It's newrly impossible to find someone my age who wants to be around a guy that's sober so that's a cool thing.




    Congrats on getting sober.



    I feel you with the friends/date thing. It's kinda crazy how literally that's someone's only hobby. I know a bunch of women that if you asked them what there hobby is, first thing they would say is "wine". Not making wine, or sampling it/connoisseur (which I feel would be fine if responsible.), but just drinking it. I think it's too much of a reflection of growing up watching **** and the City.



    My grandmother is 87, and she says it's crazy how every movie/TV show has an unnecessary scene involving drinking. And it's funny too if you watch, almost lazy writing.



    Problem is, it's such a huge money maker for the companies making it and companies hosting events, it will never go away.
  • daleheaddalehead Members Posts: 1,455 ✭✭
    The point that seems to be missed is that Rocco did not start drinking because he was lonely on the road or because he liked to party. It was to deal with his back pain so he could continue playing and making a living. Not that it's an excuse but it does put his situation in perspective. Makes you wonder how many other tour pros deal with pain in the same way, with alcohol or other drugs.
  • adkleeadklee Members Posts: 58 ClubWRX
    LeoLeo99 wrote:




    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I'm forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot��




    Pretty myopic view of the world, don't you think? Something didn't happen to you, so it doesn't exist?




    Oh **** no. Never said it doesn't exist, just never existed for me and I hate sweeping generalizations or excuses with others. In fact I have more than a few friends that are either recovering or currently are dancing w the devil.



    Just don't agree with the earlier statement that alluded to the thought that people on the road and living out of hotel rooms gives them an excuse to start drinking and becoming alcoholics.



    Alcoholism runs much deeper than lonely nights spent in a hotel room.




    I know I drink more when I travel for business. I'm lonely. I'm bored. When I travel with people, they all drink a lot. We drink every night. I don't drink every night at home.



    It's no excuse but I can understand how someone at risk could get in trouble.






    Man, the comments on traveling are right on the money. I'm constantly on the go for work and more than the work, long hours, or even the physical toll on the body from traveling, it's always the empty rooms and silence that bother me eventually. I've never been close to alcoholism--just a beer or two while doing followups, but seen a lot of dudes at the hotel bar getting slammed night in and night out.
  • cardoustiecardoustie haha, we don't play for 5's Members Posts: 11,823 ✭✭
    I knew Rocco had a problem at the Canadian Open years ago, Lots of liquor in styrofoam cups on the range etc etc



    And as a multiple back surgery guy myself I can tell you that liquor is the best Med for disk issues and leg/hip/butt nerve pain, most opioids and othe pain meds simply help your brain relax



    Same reason Tiger got addicted to pain meds ... when you can't stand or sit while not in agony life is not fun at all. All u can do is lie down and feel sorry for yourself



    Dana Quigley is another good story



    I don't drink anymore fwiw, haven't taken pain meds in 7 years. Both are a slippery slope in my opinion



    Good for him I say.



    Ps. You could see how he acted at times - think of his yapping and agitation watching Tiger make the '08 playoff - that something was up
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  • Ronnie MundtRonnie Mundt Members Posts: 121 ✭✭



    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I’m forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot😂




    Pretty myopic view of the world, don’t you think? Something didn’t happen to you, so it doesn’t exist?




    Oh **** no. Never said it doesn’t exist, just never existed for me and I hate sweeping generalizations or excuses with others. In fact I have more than a few friends that are either recovering or currently are dancing w the devil.



    Just don’t agree with the earlier statement that alluded to the thought that people on the road and living out of hotel rooms gives them an excuse to start drinking and becoming alcoholics.



    Alcoholism runs much deeper than lonely nights spent in a hotel room.




    Is that what he alluded to? I think that’s what you are alluding to.
  • LeoLeo99LeoLeo99 Members Posts: 3,978 ✭✭




    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I'm forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot��




    Pretty myopic view of the world, don't you think? Something didn't happen to you, so it doesn't exist?




    Oh **** no. Never said it doesn't exist, just never existed for me and I hate sweeping generalizations or excuses with others. In fact I have more than a few friends that are either recovering or currently are dancing w the devil.



    Just don't agree with the earlier statement that alluded to the thought that people on the road and living out of hotel rooms gives them an excuse to start drinking and becoming alcoholics.



    Alcoholism runs much deeper than lonely nights spent in a hotel room.




    Is that what he alluded to? I think that's what you are alluding to.




    It still takes personal accountability. Better to nip a problem in the bud before it becomes a bigger problem. Thinking back to my younger days when traveling with older associates, they would often leave the restaurant after dinner and go back to their hotel rooms saying they had work to do. At the time, I thought they were hard workers. Now, that I'm that age, I assume they were either avoiding booze or hitting the bottle in their room.



    I'm sure we all know people struggling with alcohol. We might not know their struggles.
  • mocokidmocokid Members Posts: 1,736 ✭✭
    Rocco went to ballard due to the back issue.(early 2000s) Left a year or so ago, interesting.....
  • cardoustiecardoustie haha, we don't play for 5's Members Posts: 11,823 ✭✭
    I think unless you've had brutally agonizing back / sciatica pain you don't get how hard it can be on people ... and I imagine if golf is your income, then add that pressure as well
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  • FergusonFerguson Members Posts: 4,641 ✭✭
    "If you drink alone - you have a problem."

    "If you wake up guilty after a night of drinking - you have a problem."

    "If you drink to ease pain - you have a problem."



    Dr. Reston K. Precort
  • new2g0lfnew2g0lf Members Posts: 3,363 ✭✭
    Ferguson wrote:


    "If you drink alone - you have a problem."

    "If you wake up guilty after a night of drinking - you have a problem."

    "If you drink to ease pain - you have a problem."



    Dr. Reston K. Precort




    I don't think the issue today is recognizing you have a problem it's being motivated and strong enough to address it.
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  • BeerPerHoleBeerPerHole Members Posts: 1,127 ✭✭
    edited Feb 7, 2019 2:49pm #43
    Eh.....I had heard a story about Rocco trucking big drinks through his competitive rounds. I don't fully buy the pain-management line. Alcoholism isn't the same thing as physical pain management. I deal with a lot of physical pain every day. But, I chose to not address it in ways that might negatively impact my family. I'm in more pain than if I had just buckled. But, that's the tradeoff I chose. Seems like a nice guy and I'm glad he's got a handle on it. Very nice of Billy and his wife to share their story, too.
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  • augustgolfaugustgolf Golf with dignity Coastal NCMembers Posts: 3,898 ✭✭
    Ferguson wrote:


    Addiction can happen to anyone.




    Exactly - how many people here are addicted to WRX????



    Back to reality. There was a young college player that would today, be on the Champions Tour, if he hadn't become such a coke head.



    Truly a great talent. Apparently, most of the other guys on Tour - caddies & player - knew about his habit. I would assume that word got back to the Tour's administration, but - nobody did anything to help him. So, his play suffered.



    I can see other Tour players hoping that his addiction continued, so that they had an advantage over him, but....I never understood the Tour's administration position.



    If it was blatant enough for me, as a club pro at the time, to have known about it, hearing it from people who were certainly connected enough to know the truth - I really can't believe that no one representing the Tour would not have at least had a talk with him.



    As for alcohol: hey, it was a way that many an old timer coped with. Between trying to run a shop/course, plus trying to play for their living...and having lived though that period of time, I knew many pros who actually played so much better after a couple "pops".



    I say good for Rocco - I have always respected the fact the he took "the road less traveled" along his journey,
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  • FergusonFerguson Members Posts: 4,641 ✭✭
    augustgolf wrote:

    Ferguson wrote:


    Addiction can happen to anyone.




    Exactly - how many people here are addicted to WRX????



    Back to reality. There was a young college player that would today, be on the Champions Tour, if he hadn't become such a coke head.



    Truly a great talent. Apparently, most of the other guys on Tour - caddies & player - knew about his habit. I would assume that word got back to the Tour's administration, but - nobody did anything to help him. So, his play suffered.



    I can see other Tour players hoping that his addiction continued, so that they had an advantage over him, but....I never understood the Tour's administration position.



    If it was blatant enough for me, as a club pro at the time, to have known about it, hearing it from people who were certainly connected enough to know the truth - I really can't believe that no one representing the Tour would not have at least had a talk with him.



    As for alcohol: hey, it was a way that many an old timer coped with. Between trying to run a shop/course, plus trying to play for their living...and having lived though that period of time, I knew many pros who actually played so much better after a couple "pops".



    I say good for Rocco - I have always respected the fact the he took "the road less traveled" along his journey,






    30% of all regular posting members.
  • Steele47Steele47 Members Posts: 1,304 ✭✭

    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I'm forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot��








    Consider yourself lucky. Some people just have the predisposition to overindulge whether it be genetic or environmental or a combination of the two. I never bought into the 'it's a disease' thing as I control my arms and legs etc... and have gotten into polite arguments with folks in the profession of rehabilitation about it but I do strongly believe in the existence of 'predisposition'.



    To those who don't understand why alcoholics are essentially powerless... Well I"m an alcoholic of 40 years (sober 5 years so far this time) and I don't understand it either. The way I look at it is,,,, I can always get sloshed tomorrow.



    You see, I have taken my awful fault/trait of procrastination and have used it to my advantage to stay sober.
  • gatorMDgatorMD Hacker-in-Chief ClubWRX Posts: 4,564 ClubWRX
    Ferguson wrote:

    gvogel wrote:

    Ferguson wrote:


    Addiction can happen to anyone.




    Hmmm, yes, but some people are more prone than others.






    I disagree. Other than those chemically affected in the womb or as a result of medical treatment - the choice to abuse drugs or alcohol beyond one's limit is entirely the in the hands of the individual. In other words, and staying on topic, no one except Rocco put the booze into his body.



    Addiction is the inability to stop.




    this is inaccurate. Addiction and esp alcoholism has known genetic and environmental risk factors. it is not a choice, it is a disease. u have a very limited and superficial view on the topic tbh. there are a lot of great resources out there now if u care to educate urself.



    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alcohol-use-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20369243



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  • farmerfarmer Members Posts: 7,843 ✭✭
    edited Feb 7, 2019 4:55pm #48
    Good for Rocco, wish him the best. Getting sober is hard, staying sober is harder. I was never much of a drinker, but 30 or so years ago, I lost my taste for it, and lost my taste for the effects. In the years since, I have been surprised at how many people have been annoyed or disbelieving about this thing that just kind of happened. I have had people try to trick me into drinking, have had folks get pissed because I wouldn't take a beer while playing, or have drinks after a round. My go to is "it's not a moral issue, I just don't like it", which works 98% of the time. I played in partnership tourneys with a friend who many times drank us out of contention on Saturday night because he wanted that excuse for Sunday. Only took about 10 years for me to figure out why.
  • wfrogge1wfrogge1 Members Posts: 1,192 ✭✭
    gatorMD wrote:


    Tom Watson and Lee Trevino probably the most famous with alcohol.





    Tiger with pills



    DJ with illicit drugs



    Lots smoke pot for sure.



    Golf is all mental. It's really not hard to believe golf and mind altering drugs get mixed together. Both on and off the course.




    John Daly just said "They are the most famous for drinking? Hold my beer and watch this!"
  • Forged4everForged4ever To See A Man’s True Character, Play Golf With Him The Burgh/Hdcp: My gene poolClubWRX Posts: 15,678 ClubWRX
    edited Feb 7, 2019 5:02pm #50

    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I’m forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot😂
    Having started with one of the big strategy houses after grad school, we lived on the road for weeks on end and while we had 4-star accommodations, none the less, the nights could indeed get lonely if you let your mind go there. I did not. That’s not a good or bad thing, it’s just the way that I was.



    However I believe that comparing a regular business man’s trip to that of a Tour Pro, is 🍎s to 🍊s, UNLESS your business trip was such that if you did not bring in a new client/customer, or somehow earn money on your trip, you would end up earning zero, getting paid zero and going home less the cost and expenses of the trip. There is no salary, there is no guarantee, there is no expense account. It’s your **** and your money on the line and if you don’t perform, you are in the negative for the week.



    Now THAT adds a bit of pressure that would make it more 🍎s to 🍎s with the pressure that many Tour Pros face, alone on the road, with mouths to feed, bodies to clothe and mortgages to pay at home.



    It’s a whole different world, forget about “game.”



    As always, just my .03 worth😉



    Cheers🍻

    RP
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  • bladehunterbladehunter Today was a good day.... Members Posts: 25,783 ✭✭
    edited Feb 7, 2019 5:03pm #51
    Ferguson wrote:

    augustgolf wrote:

    Ferguson wrote:


    Addiction can happen to anyone.




    Exactly - how many people here are addicted to WRX????



    Back to reality. There was a young college player that would today, be on the Champions Tour, if he hadn't become such a coke head.



    Truly a great talent. Apparently, most of the other guys on Tour - caddies & player - knew about his habit. I would assume that word got back to the Tour's administration, but - nobody did anything to help him. So, his play suffered.



    I can see other Tour players hoping that his addiction continued, so that they had an advantage over him, but....I never understood the Tour's administration position.



    If it was blatant enough for me, as a club pro at the time, to have known about it, hearing it from people who were certainly connected enough to know the truth - I really can't believe that no one representing the Tour would not have at least had a talk with him.



    As for alcohol: hey, it was a way that many an old timer coped with. Between trying to run a shop/course, plus trying to play for their living...and having lived though that period of time, I knew many pros who actually played so much better after a couple "pops".



    I say good for Rocco - I have always respected the fact the he took "the road less traveled" along his journey,






    30% of all regular posting members.




    But to the point. Is it addiction if you can stop ? I love you guys but I can leave and not come back and after a day or two I’d probably be glad of it. Somebody else will listen to me b****. I have employees. They have no choice. Lol ( a joke people... my guys are treated better than I treat myself ).
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  • gatorMDgatorMD Hacker-in-Chief ClubWRX Posts: 4,564 ClubWRX

    Ferguson wrote:

    augustgolf wrote:

    Ferguson wrote:


    Addiction can happen to anyone.




    Exactly - how many people here are addicted to WRX????



    Back to reality. There was a young college player that would today, be on the Champions Tour, if he hadn't become such a coke head.



    Truly a great talent. Apparently, most of the other guys on Tour - caddies & player - knew about his habit. I would assume that word got back to the Tour's administration, but - nobody did anything to help him. So, his play suffered.



    I can see other Tour players hoping that his addiction continued, so that they had an advantage over him, but....I never understood the Tour's administration position.



    If it was blatant enough for me, as a club pro at the time, to have known about it, hearing it from people who were certainly connected enough to know the truth - I really can't believe that no one representing the Tour would not have at least had a talk with him.



    As for alcohol: hey, it was a way that many an old timer coped with. Between trying to run a shop/course, plus trying to play for their living...and having lived though that period of time, I knew many pros who actually played so much better after a couple "pops".



    I say good for Rocco - I have always respected the fact the he took "the road less traveled" along his journey,






    30% of all regular posting members.




    But to the point. Is it addiction if you can stop ? I love you guys but I can leave and not come back and after a day or two I'd probably be glad of it. Somebody else will listen to me b****. I have employees. They have no choice. Lol ( a joke people... my guys are treated better than I treat myself ).




    lol, not sure if i am addicted to golfwrx (but i do love it and u all), BUT i def am addicted to GOLF. like I get antsy if i haven't hit balls in two or three days....
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  • NPVWhizNPVWhiz Members Posts: 1,976 ✭✭
    edited Feb 8, 2019 12:36pm #53
    bscinstnct wrote:


    I recall P Harrington (who does not drink) commenting on this



    Ahhh, here he is...





    "My father never drank the last 30 years of his life," Harrington says.



    "I would suggest that drink probably wasn't the best thing for him. But I'm a teetotaler for the simple reason that I don't like the taste of it. I never have. I'll take a celebration swallow, but I couldn't drink a whole beer."



    Besides the taste, there is another reason. "In the amateur game," he says, "I noticed right away that the players who drank -- some of the most talented guys -- did it to wash away expectations, as a kind of built-in alibi. 'I didn't win my match today. Well, I had six pints last night.' They didn't care for the stress. It was a way out, really. I see a little of that in the pro game, too."



    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.golfdigest.com/story/harrington/amp




    Isn’t that something like saying “I just never thought blondes were attractive, so I just didn’t date women”. 🤔
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  • tommgtommg Members Posts: 137 ✭✭
    I worked in the beverage alcohol business for over 40 years, watched countless lives destroyed. Never once heard anyone say that it’s been good for them. I’m far from a tea totaler, I enjoy a few beers with the boys and wine with dinner but it is truly a killer, perhaps the biggest of them all.
  • CalliopejulyCalliopejuly Members Posts: 72

    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I&#146;m forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot&#4322818;
    Having started with one of the big strategy houses after grad school, we lived on the road for weeks on end and while we had 4-star accommodations, none the less, the nights could indeed get lonely if you let your mind go there. I did not. That&#146;s not a good or bad thing, it&#146;s just the way that I was.



    However I believe that comparing a regular business man&#146;s trip to that of a Tour Pro, is &#4322126;s to &#4322122;s, UNLESS your business trip was such that if you did not bring in a new client/customer, or somehow earn money on your trip, you would end up earning zero, getting paid zero and going home less the cost and expenses of the trip. There is no salary, there is no guarantee, there is no expense account. It&#146;s your **** and your money on the line and if you don&#146;t perform, you are in the negative for the week.



    Now THAT adds a bit of pressure that would make it more &#4322126;s to &#4322126;s with the pressure that many Tour Pros face, alone on the road, with mouths to feed, bodies to clothe and mortgages to pay at home.



    It&#146;s a whole different world, forget about &#147;game.&#148;



    As always, just my .03 worth&#4322825;



    Cheers&#4322171;

    RP




    Insightful and on the money. There are of course people who travel for business who do essentially face the same conditions and pressures as the pros because they are self-employed, but for most people that isn’t the case. We all have to perform to a greater or less or degree, but most are not on the high wire. There is a difference.
  • OfficeNerdOfficeNerd Members Posts: 61
    Steele47 wrote:

    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I'm forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to bootí ½í¸&#130;








    Consider yourself lucky. Some people just have the predisposition to overindulge whether it be genetic or environmental or a combination of the two. I never bought into the 'it's a disease' thing as I control my arms and legs etc... and have gotten into polite arguments with folks in the profession of rehabilitation about it but I do strongly believe in the existence of 'predisposition'.



    To those who don't understand why alcoholics are essentially powerless... Well I"m an alcoholic of 40 years (sober 5 years so far this time) and I don't understand it either. The way I look at it is,,,, I can always get sloshed tomorrow.



    You see, I have taken my awful fault/trait of procrastination and have used it to my advantage to stay sober.




    Congratulations on 5years. That is no small feat.
  • Wildwing55Wildwing55 Members Posts: 288 ✭✭
    Man_O_War wrote:

    ZAP wrote:


    It really never ceases to amaze me how many lives alcohol has impacted. From a sociological perspective it actually fascinates me how much of a drinking culture we live in.






    it's one of those legal things that is mind boggling at best...




    Yep, Pot is the equivalent of whiskey in the 1920s. It's bad, but wait, it's good, it can be taxed. There are many sides to an issue, not just one.



    All the best...
  • jeffreyljeffreyl Members Posts: 278 ✭✭
    There is a genetic component; now proven. My Father, His Father, my Aunt, My sister......I have been sober for 39 years ( sober at 27), my son 32, sober for 10.

    I take full responsibility for starting at 14, knew better.



    Very fortunate to play golf at a nice place and nobody cares that I don’t drink. Fortunate with my family life, business life....All life.



    My life has been so different since quitting and Am grateful.



    If you haven’t had a problem, great....everyone is entitled to their opinion; if you haven’t lived it, you don’t really know and that is a very good thing.



  • rainkingjrrainkingjr Members Posts: 2,577 ✭✭
    People are addicted to any number of things for a multitude of reasons and it's not limited to things we consume. I consider myself lucky as I can take or leave alcohol. I do drink and consider myself an infrequent drinker. I may have a drink once or twice a week and then go for months without one. It's never been a priority. I have a drink when I'm in the mood for one. I will say that alcohol has pretty much cost me once of my closest childhood friends. He has serious alcohol issues. I won't list all of his low lights (there are many). It seemed the older we got and less I drank, the more we grew apart. It's pretty much a non-existent friendship at this point and it makes me sad. I thought I'd be playing weekend golf with the guy for the rest of my life. The party is still raging on for him. I'm just as happy to go out and sit around drinking coffee with some good people these days. Best part is remembering the good time you had.
  • Swisstrader98Swisstrader98 Members Posts: 3,518 ✭✭
    LeoLeo99 wrote:




    Baitkiller wrote:


    Lots of lonely, empty hotel rooms and airport lounges. It would be easy for me to go full lush.




    Not sure I get that one. As a forever traveling businessman I'm forever eating alone, in and out of hotels and airport lounges. Never once come close to becoming an alcoholic and I earn a bit less than these guys to boot��




    Pretty myopic view of the world, don't you think? Something didn't happen to you, so it doesn't exist?




    Oh **** no. Never said it doesn't exist, just never existed for me and I hate sweeping generalizations or excuses with others. In fact I have more than a few friends that are either recovering or currently are dancing w the devil.



    Just don't agree with the earlier statement that alluded to the thought that people on the road and living out of hotel rooms gives them an excuse to start drinking and becoming alcoholics.



    Alcoholism runs much deeper than lonely nights spent in a hotel room.




    I know I drink more when I travel for business. I'm lonely. I'm bored. When I travel with people, they all drink a lot. We drink every night. I don't drink every night at home.



    It's no excuse but I can understand how someone at risk could get in trouble.




    I hear that Leo and same for me with a LOT of years on the road. A couple beers each night in my room or at the bar and any time we get together as a team, more drinks.



    That being said, no one on my team or myself ever became an alcoholic. If someone falls into that rathole because he’s “on the edge”, it quite likely that just about anything or anyone could have pushed him over that edge.
  • TroutflyTroutfly Members Posts: 236 ✭✭
    Ferguson wrote:

    gvogel wrote:

    Ferguson wrote:


    Addiction can happen to anyone.




    Hmmm, yes, but some people are more prone than others.






    I disagree. Other than those chemically affected in the womb or as a result of medical treatment - the choice to abuse drugs or alcohol beyond one's limit is entirely the in the hands of the individual. In other words, and staying on topic, no one except Rocco put the booze into his body.



    Addiction is the inability to stop.


    Other than your last statement, so wrong in so many ways.
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